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Topic: 2011 Contemporary Lit challenge: CATEGORIES and LISTS

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Subject: 2011 Contemporary Lit challenge: CATEGORIES and LISTS
Date Posted: 11/14/2010 5:45 PM ET
Member Since: 10/4/2010
Posts: 244
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Challenge: Read 12/13 (or 6/12 for a "lite" challenge).

Also, since 50 years seems to be a commonly accepted standard for establishing a "classic" (and because people like clarity), I'm considering "contemporary" literature anything written within the past 50 years.

 

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read:

  4. non-fiction:

  5. science fiction/fantasy:

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:

  7. work made into a film:

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:

  10. mystery/horror:

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):

  12. work translated into English:

  13.  major literary prize winner:



Last Edited on: 11/20/10 3:27 PM ET - Total times edited: 3
Date Posted: 11/14/2010 6:17 PM ET
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contemporary political issueThe Reluctant Fundamentalist by Hamid 1/17/11 (4.5 stars)

alludes to an earlier workInterred with Their Bones by Carrell 4/30/11 (2.0 stars)

haven't yet readA Confederacy of Dunces by Toole

science fiction/fantasy: Little, Big by Crowley 11/13/11 (4.5 stars)

"developing" country:  Disgrace by Coetzee 5/21/11 (5 stars)

made into a filmWatership Down by Adams 11/29/11 (5 stars) 

one of a country's greatest: The Road by McCarthy   2/4/11 (4.5 stars)

takes place in another centuryThe Dress Lodger by Holman 10/16/11 (3.5 stars)

mystery/horrorCrooked Letter, Crooked Letter by Franklin 7/31/11 (3.5 stars)

"non-novel": In Other Rooms, Other Wonders by  Mueenuddin

translated:  TBD

prize winner: Let the Great World Spin by McCann 11/18/11 (5 stars)



Last Edited on: 11/30/11 9:38 PM ET - Total times edited: 45
Date Posted: 11/14/2010 8:32 PM ET
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  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):  31 Hours/Masha Hamilton  finished 1/2/11

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:  Death of a Dreamer/MC Beaton  finished 8/31/11

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read:  The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society/Shaffer & Barrows finished 5/2/11

  4. non-fiction/historical fiction: What I Thought I Knew/Alice Eve Cohen  finished 6/4/11

  5. science fiction/fantasy:  Blackout/Connie Willis  finished 11/25/11
  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:  The Space Between Us/Thrity Umrigar  finished 2/14

  7. work made into a film:  Remains of the Day/Kazuo Ishiguro  finished 10/30/11

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:  Omitting this category

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:  A Long Shadow/Charles Todd  finished 3/31/11

  10. mystery/horror:  Think of a Number/John Verdon finished 9/15/11

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays) Karma and Other Stories/Rishi Reddi  finished 5/23/11

  12. work translated into English: Frozen Tracks/Ake Edwardson  finished 10/10/11

  13.  major literary prize winner:  Possession/A.S. Byatt  finished 11/12/11



 



Last Edited on: 11/25/11 5:08 PM ET - Total times edited: 16
Subject: b
Date Posted: 11/21/2010 7:54 AM ET
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"Contemporary" literature anything written within the past 50 years.  DONE!!!!!

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):  A Cup of Friendship: A Novel by Deborah Rodriguez   This is an interesting read from an Afghan cultural viewpoint. However, I felt that the story was a bit unrealistic. In a war-torn city like Kabul plagued by terrorist bombings, it seems unlikely that traditionalists such as those depicted in the story would give up these values to have fairytale romances based on western values. The author did live in the city for five years and, I suspect designed the story from incidents she experienced or heard about for this novel. For this reason I gave it 3 stars.

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:  The City of Glass by Cassandra Clare  This is a series that kept me reading and reading.  Have truly enjoyed each and every one and there is another book coming called City of Fallen Angels.  Many of the mysteries raised in earlier volumes were solved in this one.  And, I discovered that I was beginning to understand the author's writing style and train of thought.  I found myself guessing some of the outcomes.  Cass and Jace are intriguing heroes.  And, Cass's mother is an outstanding role model. Luke's gentle, caring personality adds so much to the story.  Simon has become a vampire who is developing a mature personality and becoming comfortable with himself.  A new villain has appeared in this volume who is certain to reappear in the next book.  To say much more would give away much of the joy of reading this book.  Don't miss it.  Give it 5 stars.

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read:  The Elegance of a Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery  Found it difficult to get into this book in the beginning because it took me awhile to sort out the characters.  Different individuals discuss their lives, feelings, emotions and philosophy of life.  However, I grew to really like Renee Michel, the concierge, and Paloma Josse, the highly intelligent 12-year-old who becomes her friend.  Best of all for me was Paloma's last statement:  "...for you (Renee), I'll be searching for those moments of always within never.  Beauty, in this world."   3 stars.

  4. non-fiction: Homer's Odyssey by Gwen Cooper   A delightful story about a blind cat, his survival from two weeks of age with a life threatening infection to a full life with his owner and her friends, all of whom learn a great deal about life, love, enthusiasm and endurance from this little black cat named Homer.  A quick fun and heart lifting read about people and a cat with an irrepressible zest for life and adventure.  For Homer, life itself is a wonderful adventure.   3 to 3.5 stars

  5. science fiction/fantasy:  Mockingjay by Suzanne Collins 1/9/2010  I'm not sure how I feel about this book.   It wabecos good - very good, in fact, but I think that I liked Catching Fire better.  The rebel war heats up in the final volume of this trilogy.    Once again, many people die.  There is conflict for Katniss as she tries to work with the president of District 13 who is in essence the leader of the rebellion.  Katniss has become the much loved or much hated (depending upon which side you are on) of the rebellion.  It's a role about which she has conflicting feelings.  And, when she loses her beloved sister, Prim, I was almost angry with the author.  Keeping Prim (and her mother) safe was the whole reason Katniss became involved in the first place.  Still she struggles with her feelings about Gale and Peeta which is resolved at last in the final pages of the book.  Give it 4 stars.

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:  The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.  Perhaps this book is not from a developing country since it is based in Spain but I shall leave it here because the character becomes poor again and again.  It's a  wonderful read.  I have put more of this author's work on my TBR as he writes so very well.  This is a tale of a shepherd boy named Santiago who wants to travel in spite of his father's wish that he become a priest.  The father stakes the boy who buys himself some sheep.  He travels throughout Andulasia with his herd, getting to know the land and the people.  However, he has a dream that he asks an old woman to interpret and with this interpretation sets off to see the pyramids in Egypt where he is to find treasure and become rich.  The key message of the tale is to follow our dreams.  Never give up say the people the boy meets and so says the author as well in an interview in the back of the book.  It's simple, inspiring and a delight to read so friends read this one and get a new look on your own life in spite of whatever obstacles you encounter and like Santiago you may find your dreams can come true.  Above all, don't give up.  5 stars

  7. work made into a film:  The Girl with the Dragon Tatoo by Stieg Larsson - reread and Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro for my new read.  I enjoyed it but it was very much like the film version.  This Booker award winner is a good read about what were once rather rigid class distinctions in England.  Furthermore, the story gives one a good look at what it was to be a butler in the great houses during WWII.  As a sidelight to these issues is the interaction between the butler and the housekeeper which might have become more that professionalism.  The story unfolds as the butler takes a motor holiday across the country to see sights and see the former housekeeper who has made a different life for herself.  Give it 5 stars.

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:  The Girl Who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson.   This book picks up where The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo ends.  We discover who is Lisabeth's father and find that she is suspected of three murders.  As a result much of her abnormal childhood and youth is exposed to the national press and she is the object of a nationwide manhunt. Even some of those she deems as friends become convinced that she is this cold-blooded killer.  Mikael believes, however, that she is innocent and works to discover who is the real killer.  Fortunately, Lisabeth's pension for privacy keeps her safe until she encounters her father and the actual killer.  I truly enjoyed the read and was so glad that she survived to be featured in another novel.  5 stars

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:  Moloka'i by Alan Brennert.  How does one write about a book that so imprints the heart and mind?  There is love, ignorance and cruel treatment of the less fortunate.  Rachel is a six-year-old who has been diagnosed with leprosy.  She doesn't understand what is happening - only that her uncle has leprosy, too, and that her parents can no longer be with her.  As she is taken away for treatment, she cries and screams for her loving family.  Treatment is unsuccessful and she is moved to a leprosy treatment community to isolate her from the healthy.   In Kalaupapa, the isolated leper colony on the island of Moloka'i, she finds love from her Uncle Pono and his lover, other children with leprosy, and Sister Catherine (Ruth).  She grows up in Kalaupapa, falls in love and marries a kind young man.  They have a daughter which they name Ruth after Sister Catherine.  As lepers they must give up their healthy daughter for adoption if they can find no family member to adopt her for their own. The story weaves throughout Rachel's life and she witnesses the changes, both political and modernization, that come to Hawaii as well as Kalaupapa.  Many of the characters are based on real personalities but that of Rachel is a combination of several.  I rarely shed tears reading a book, but I foun them flowing freely as I read this story.  I can make no higher recommendation than this - DON'T MISS THIS STORY.  I give it 5 stars without a doubt more if I could.

  10. mystery/horror:  Dark Road to Darjeeling by Deanna Raybourn    I have read the earlier novels in this series and loved them.  Easy, fun reads and Lady Julia and Brisbane are such fascinating characters.  This was a good read but I was disappointed in Raybourn's treatment of the marriage between Lady Julia and Brisbane.  Normally, people work at getting to know each other in the first year of marriage.  I thought Raybourn dwelt too much on their differences and the resulting conflicts.  However, the murder was so different from many others and really solved itself, rather than Lady Julia and Brisbane solving it.  Give it 3 stars.

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):   The Woman Lit by Fireflies (3 short stories) by Jim Harrison.  Brown Dog is the first novella in this collection.  He is the storyteller and his experiences may lead to the unearthing of an ancient Native American grave mound to his friend and lover whose dream is to become a famous anthropologist. He does not know who his father might have been, a fact that haunts him throughout his life. When he discovers the body of an Indian chief he wonders if it could have been him.  

    The second story, titled Sunset Limited, finds four friends who demonstrated against war, the draft, and other issues together again after making their own lives.  Originally, there were five friends and while four of them went on to other lives, Zip continued his unorthodox lifestyle which eventually lands him in a Mexican prison with an impending 50-year sentence and he fears he will be murdered.  He writes to Gwen and tells her of his fears.  She rounds up the others and they travel to Mexico with the hope of freeing Zip.  The story finds one friend who hopes to redeem himself after abandoning zip so long ago.
     
    The Woman lit by Fireflies was my favorite story.  She loved fine literature, married, raised children and finds that her husband has turned into a controlling person and she doesn't want to live with him anymore so she runs away.  The tale depicts her first night outdoors where she thinks about her life, what it is and what she wants it to be.  The wonderful ending finds her in Paris living and reading as she always dreamed she would.  Give it 4 stars, especially for this tale.   
  12. work translated into English:  Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel.  I had forgotten how much fun this book might be.  Years ago I saw and enjoyed the movie but had not yet read the book written by Esquivel.  The movie won ten awards.  Unique in its approach, this is the story of a passionate love affair between Tita and Pedro.  Thwarted by Mama Elena, her mother, Tita pours all the love she has into her cooking.  It is traditional, her mother says, that the youngest daughter stay unmarried to take care of her mother until she dies.  To assure that Pedro is unattainable she bullies him into marrying her daughter, Rosaura.  However, with the emotion Tita pours into her culinary creations, strange events occur.  Guests at the wedding of Pedro and Rosaura experience food poisoning, a sister runs stark naked into the community and is taken by a revolutionary officer on his horse and they both ride away, and when Rosaura and Pedro's daughter, Esperanza, is married the guests become most amourous and leave the wedding early.  Truly enjoyed this story and recommend it to anyone who enjoys strange occurrences, ghosts, and visions as created by this talented Mexican author.  4 stars  

  13.  major literary prize winner:  The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen.  A most interesting novel that depicts a family whose problems seem, at first, so dysfunctional, actually illustrate the growth and maturing of family relations.  I found parts of the novel difficult to read through but those sections were needed to understand the family members as individuals. This is not an easy read but a read that sets one to thinking about life and one's own family and how it functions.  Especially enjoyed the ending where the family members rediscover what its like to be a family.  Give it 3 stars.



Last Edited on: 3/13/14 4:58 PM ET - Total times edited: 101
Date Posted: 11/27/2010 11:51 AM ET
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  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):    Sold by Patricia McCormick    Hard to read because the subject matter is so painful.  A totally naive 14 year old, small village Nepalese girl is sold into prostitution by her step-father and mother, and taken to India and sold to a brothel.  The lives of these women is brutal and harsh and mean.  They are the least of society's daughters and forced into sex work against their will.  Although this topic is given press, a book like this brings the individual into focus and it is terrifying and tragic.           The Ha-Ha by Dave King.  Really fine novel about a head/brain injured Vietnam Vet who can no longer speak, read or write.  His understanding is intact of language, he just cannot answer back or write his words.  Well written and touching.   Great characters, including his roommates and x-girlfriend's 9 year old son.

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:     Leaving Ireland by Ann Moore    I liked this book and it is quite different from the one before it, Gracelin O'Malley.   The book is about Grace's flight from Ireland to America where she meets up with her brother, Sean, who fled to America in the last book.  She doesn't go far from her Irish neighborhood in New York City and all the Irish people she knows and understands.  By the end of the book, trouble has found her again and she will be moving on to San Franciso. 

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read:  Carry Me Home by Sandra Kring   Nice book about WWII.  A mentally disabled teenage boy is the voice and he describes the experience of living through WWII with his Mom and Dad in small town America.  Rationing, Brother in the Army in the Philippines, the mothers of dead soldiers, Victory gardens......Worth the read and touching.                                                                                               The Memory of Running by Ron McLarty  -  I didn't know where to stick this one in but I really liked this book.  I haven't been reading very much contempory literature and this book just jumped into my hand yesterday.  The main character in the book goes through a profound transformation and the process of telling his story and how he started on his transformational journey is very well done (riding a bike across the entire US to reclaim his sister's body). 

  4. non-fiction:   Hero of the Underground by Jason Peter  Very thought provoking book about addiction recovery.  Not very emotional but reveals the struggle of professional athletes to create a life after they have wrecked their bodies and become dependent on drugs when the game has been their entire existence since they were kids. 

  5. science fiction/fantasy:   World War Z by Max Brooks. This is a great book and not at all what I expected.  Written as an Oral History of this worldwide event of zombies overrunning the entire planet, but never is it weird or unbelievable.  Not so much about the zombies as about how the social and political reations to such a bizarre threat to mankind was mishandled and then successfully dealt with just in time.  Don't hesitate to read this one even if SCiFI is not your thing.                  Miracles by Mary Kirk.  Alright, not a heavy tome, for sure, but very compelling.  about a man who has died and come back and now can heal peoples injuries or illnesses is some cases.  Moving little novel.

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:  Blindness by Saramago

  7. work made into a film:     On The Beach by Nevil Shute.  I finally reread this book recently.  The first time i read it and saw the movie, I missed so much because I was simply too young to understand.  I totally missed the American  Navel Officer part.  And the concern for the Aussie couple's baby. 

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:   Devil's Canyon by Hank Mitchum.  If you love westerns, stagecoach journeys, kids, rasty ole guys who fall in love with the drop of a hat and banditos, then you would love Hank Mitchum. 

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:    Savage Lands by Clare Clark - Well, I had a hard time finishing this one.   Hard, cold, tough, gritty, mean, did I say cold?  Life in the French territory of Louisiana in the 1704.  The territory is ruled by French army officers who are dealing in slaves and becoming wealthy men.  Of course, women are recruited to go there and marry the men.  The women of the times lead the hardest lives.  One interesting character in a young man who is good with languages and is sent to learn how to negotiate with the Indians.  Interesting book in that it is about the French in the Americas instead of the British. 

  10.   mystery/horror:       The Mountain Between Us by Charles Martin.  4 stars.  Can two people survive in the winter in the mountains after crashing in a small plane when the pilot has a deadly heart attack.  There are times when you can be sure that these two people, one of whom suffers a serious broken femur, cannot survive.  In the end they do, but the journey makes for exciting reading.

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):    Quite a Year for Plums by Bailey White   This was a book put together of the stories about the same people in a little country town in the South.  The elderly ladies are great, the local available bachelor is great and the stories are pretty boring.  I give it 2.5 stars

  12. work translated into English:      OK.  I am cheating because I couldn't make myself read a translated work, I am reading two versions of the same book.  Readeeming Love by Francine Rivers was first written with some lusty action in it.  Then Rivers started writing for the Christian market and they sanitized her first book, Redeeming Love, and now sell it as a Christian novel with all the sex action and offensive language removed.  Some places they have not even attemped to make sense of the story, they just simply removed the sex or swearing and the paragraph makes no sense whatsoever.  Interesting example of ruining a good story and a well written book..

  13.  major literary prize winner:   The Middle Passage by Charles Johnson (National Book Award 1990)   An horrific book about the state of race relations during the 1830's after importing slaves had become illegal.  The main character must leave New Orleans in a hurry and stowaway on a ship.  As a free Black man he get to see first hand, the ugly and brutal world of slave trading.   There is no good news in the book and every character, including the main character, is an odious human being. 



Last Edited on: 11/1/11 6:11 PM ET - Total times edited: 25
Date Posted: 11/29/2010 1:17 AM ET
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Challenge: Read 12/13 - "contemporary" literature anything written within the past 50 years. Finished all 13

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc): Little Bee - Chris Cleave 7/29/11

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work: Zorro - Isabel Allende (re-interpretation of the Mark of Zorro by Johnston McCulley-1919) 1/18/11

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: The Double Bind - Chris Bohjalian 10/22/11

  4. non-fiction: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks - Rebecca Skloot 5/6/11

  5. science fiction/fantasy: Destiny Kills - Keri Arthur (sea dragons) 10/14/11

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country: Captain Pantoja & the Special Service - Mario Vargas Llosa (Peru) 3/4/11

  7. work made into a film: Brokeback Mountain - Annie Proulx 3/16/11

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers: The Lacuna - Barbara Kingsolver 3/12/11

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century: In the Shadow of the Cypress - Thomas Steinbeck (1906 California) 1/20/11

  10. mystery/horror: Burn - Linda Howard 6/23/11

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays): The Lives of the Muses: Nine Women and the Artists they Inspired - Francine Prose 2/18/11

  12. work translated into English: The Bookseller of Kabul - Asne Seierstad (Norwegian) 2/6/11

  13.  major literary prize winner: March - Geraldine Brooks (Pulitzer-2006) 3/20/11



Last Edited on: 10/23/11 6:34 PM ET - Total times edited: 17
Date Posted: 12/2/2010 7:29 PM ET
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Saving my spot!

 

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read:

  4. non-fiction:

  5. science fiction/fantasy:

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:

  7. work made into a film:

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:

  10. mystery/horror:

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):

  12. work translated into English:

  13.  major literary prize winner:

Mary (mepom) -
Subject: I am in for the challenge
Date Posted: 12/5/2010 2:32 PM ET
Member Since: 1/23/2009
Posts: 1,192
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Mary

 COMPLETED

Challenge: Read 12/13 (or 6/12 for a "lite" challenge).

Also, since 50 years seems to be a commonly accepted standard for establishing a "classic" (and because people like clarity), I'm considering "contemporary" literature anything written within the past 50 years.

 

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc): CHRISTINE FALLS by BENJAMIN BLACK  COMPLETE

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:  Shaken  by J A Konrath  COMPLETE

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: Right as Rain by George Pelecanos  COMPLETE

  4. non-fiction: OUTLIERS by Malcolm Gladwell COMPLETE

  5. science fiction/fantasy: Serpent's Daughter by SUZANNE ARRUDA COMPLETE

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country: THIRTY Three TEETH by Colin Cotterill   COMPLETE

  7. work made into a film: Kaleidoscope  J Robert Janes COMPLETE

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writer Dogs of Riga by  HENNING MANKILL BOOK COMPLETE

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century: Forever by Pete Hamill   COMPLETE

  10. mystery/horror: Dying to Sin  by Stephen Booth   COMPLETE

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays  SKIPPED

  12. work translated into English: SNOWMAN by Jo Nesbo  COMPLETE

  13.  major literary prize winner: TEST OF WILLS  by Charles Todd   COMPLETE

     



Last Edited on: 9/4/11 5:30 PM ET - Total times edited: 5
Date Posted: 12/6/2010 12:54 PM ET
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  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc): Three Cups of Tea  *** Read 12/2011
  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal by Christopher Moore  (Read 1/22/11)has the same demon, Catch, from Practical Demonkeeping
  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: Here be Dragons by Sharon Penman **** Read 2/20/11
  4. non-fiction: Tough Plants for Florida Gardens by Felder Rushing (Read 2/6/11)
  5. science fiction/fantasy: Raven Rise (Pendragon, Bk 9) by D. J. MacHale (Read 2/10/11)
  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:
  7. work made into a film: Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson ***** (being made)  or Killing Floor (also being made?)
  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by  Douglas Adams ***
  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:The Prize by Julie Garwood **** (Read 1/22/11)
  10. mystery/horror: If Books Could Kill (A Bibliophile Mystery, #2) by Kate Carlisle (Read 2/2/11)
  11. "non-novel":  When the Wind Blows by Raymond Briggs (Read 2/14/11)
  12. work translated into English: Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
  13.  major literary prize winner: Ender's Game, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, A Confederacy of Dunces, Middlesex ,The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

10 out of 13 isn't so bad. Giving up on 20 Dec 11



Last Edited on: 12/20/11 4:09 PM ET - Total times edited: 12
Date Posted: 12/6/2010 8:22 PM ET
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contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc)

Infidel :: Ayaan Hirsi Ali April 2011

work by one author that alludes to an earlier work

book/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read

The Red Tent :: Anita Diamant

non-fiction

Methland: The Death and Life of an American Small Town :: Nick Reding

science fiction/fantasy

book by an author from a "developing" country

The Kite Runner :: Khaled Hosseini

work made into a film

work by a country's greatest living writer

work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century

Someone Knows My Name :: Lawrence Hill February 2011

"non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays)

How Did You Get This Number :: Sloane Crosley January 2011

work translated into English

Gourmet Rhapsody :: Muriel Barbery February 2011

on a high school reading list (hadn't been written when you were in HS)

a literary prize winner

Interpreter of Maladies :: Jhumpa Lahiri April 2011 (Pulitzer Prize 2000)

 



Last Edited on: 7/16/11 2:37 PM ET - Total times edited: 11
Bruce -
Date Posted: 12/11/2010 10:28 PM ET
Member Since: 12/19/2008
Posts: 3,412
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Challenge: Read 12/13 (or 6/12 for a "lite" challenge).

Also, since 50 years seems to be a commonly accepted standard for establishing a "classic" (and because people like clarity), I'm considering "contemporary" literature anything written within the past 50 years.

 

  1. contemporary political issue: "The Farther Shore" Matthew Eck  (War in Somalia?)

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work: "Nowhere To Run" C J Box

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: "Electric Barracuda"  Tim Dorsey

  4. non-fiction: "All The Way To Berlin" James Megellas

  5. science fiction/fantasy: "The Great Hunt" Robert Jordan

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:

  7. work made into a film: "The Godfather" Mario Puzo

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers: "That Old Cape Magic" Richard Russo

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century: "The Black Tower" Louis Bayard

  10. mystery/horror: "The Motive" John Lescroart

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):

  12. work translated into English: "Cathedral of the Sea" Ildefonso Falcones

  13.  major literary prize winner: "Dog Soldiers" Robert Stone (1975 National Book Award)



Last Edited on: 10/3/11 10:13 PM ET - Total times edited: 8
Date Posted: 12/13/2010 9:24 PM ET
Member Since: 9/30/2007
Posts: 5,696
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Saving my spot.

Challenge: Read 12/13 (or 6/12 for a "lite" challenge).

Also, since 50 years seems to be a commonly accepted standard for establishing a "classic" (and because people like clarity), I'm considering "contemporary" literature anything written within the past 50 years.

 

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read:

  4. non-fiction:

  5. science fiction/fantasy:

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:

  7. work made into a film:

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:

  10. mystery/horror:

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):

  12. work translated into English:

  13.  major literary prize winner:

Subject: PhoenixFalls' List
Date Posted: 12/14/2010 3:52 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
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  1. Contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc): Until I Find You, by John Irving (Child abuse, mental illness). Start date: 5/29/11. Finish date: 6/10/11. Rating: 3 1/2 stars.

  2. Work by one author that alludes to an earlier work: Among Others, by Jo Walton. Start date: 1/26/11. Finish date: 1/26/11. Rating: 4 stars.

  3. Work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: A Canticle for Leibowitz, by Walter M. Miller, Jr. Start date: 12/23/11. Finish date: 12/27/11. Rating: 3 1/2 stars.

  4. Non-fiction: The Philosophical Breakfast Club, by Laura J. Snyder. Start date: 3/2/11. Finish date: 4/9/11. Rating: 4 1/2 stars.

  5. Science fiction/fantasy: The Habitation of the Blessed, by Catherynne M. Valente. Start date: 3/30/11. Finish date: 4/12/11. Rating: 5 stars.

  6. Work by an author from a "developing" country: Zoo City, by Lauren Beukes. Start date: 3/17/11. Finish date: 3/21/11. Rating: 3 1/2 stars.

  7. Work made into a film: The Princess Bride, by William Goldman. Start date: 11/28/11. Finish date: 11/30/11. Rating: 1 star.

  8. Work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers: The Steep Approach to Garbadale, by Iain Banks. Start date: 7/13/11. Finish date: 12/10/11. Rating: 2 1/2 stars.

  9. Work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century: Black Sheep, by Georgette Heyer. Start date: 2/8/11. Finish date: 2/8/11. Rating: 5 stars.

  10. Mystery/horror: The Westing Game, by Ellen Raskin. Start date: 1/21/11. Finish date: 1/21/11. Rating: 3 1/2 stars.

  11. Non-novel (short stories, play, poetry, essays): Cut Through the Bone, by Ethel Rohan. Start date: 5/18/11. Finish date: 6/18/11. Rating: 4 1/2 stars.

  12. Work translated into English: Invisible Cities, by Italo Calvino. Start date: 10/11/11. Finish date: 11/28/11. Rating: 4 stars.

  13. Major literary prize winner:



Last Edited on: 12/27/11 8:55 PM ET - Total times edited: 20
Date Posted: 12/15/2010 10:20 AM ET
Member Since: 7/6/2007
Posts: 758
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Lite Challenge

       1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc)  Portrait of a Spy by Daniel Silva  Finished 7/26/11  448pgs.

            2.  Work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:   Purity of Blood by Arturo Perez-Reverte    Finished 8/8/11   262pgs.

            3.     work made into a film: Battle Royale by  Koushun Takami    Finished 2/16/11  615pgs.

           4.    work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers: The Little Drummer Girl by John Le Carre

     5.    work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century: Pope Joan by Donna Cross    Finished 5/1/11  411pgs.

     6.    work translated into English: Captain Alatriste by Arturo Perez-Reverte   Finished 6/2/11  248pgs.



Last Edited on: 8/8/11 4:34 PM ET - Total times edited: 9
Subject: Read 12/13
Date Posted: 12/17/2010 8:04 PM ET
Member Since: 5/14/2008
Posts: 2,129
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  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read:

  4. non-fiction:

  5. science fiction/fantasy:

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:

  7. work made into a film:

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:

  10. mystery/horror:

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):

  12. work translated into English:

  13.  major literary prize winner:

 



Last Edited on: 12/17/10 8:05 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Geri (geejay) -
Date Posted: 12/26/2010 5:22 AM ET
Member Since: 9/2/2008
Posts: 9,094
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  1. Contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):    Sold by Patricia McCormick   

  2. Work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:  Ahab's Wife by Sena Jeter Naslund

  3. Work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read:  Carry Me Home by Sandra Kring  

  4. Non-fiction:   First Ladies by Margaret Truman

  5. Science fiction/fantasy:     The Time Travelere's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

  6. Work by an author from a "developing" country:  The Cave by Jose Saramago

  7. Work made into a film:     The Girl who Played with Fire by Stieg Larsson

  8. Work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:   The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

  9. Work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:   Maps and Shadows by Krysia Jopek

  10. Mystery/horror:    The Cell by Stephen King

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):    American Diner: Then and Now by Richard J. S. Gutman

  12. Work translated into English: The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

  13.  Major literary prize winner:   Polio: An American Story  by David M. Oshinsky



Last Edited on: 3/29/11 5:46 AM ET - Total times edited: 8
Date Posted: 12/29/2010 11:00 AM ET
Member Since: 1/14/2009
Posts: 175
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  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work: This World We Live In/Susan Beth Pfeffer (01/11/11)

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: Darkly Dreaming Dexter/Jeff Lindsey (01/08/11)

  4. non-fiction:

  5. science fiction/fantasy:

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:

  7. work made into a film:

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:

  10. mystery/horror:

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays): Beyond Armageddon/Walter Miller (ed.) ( 01/30/11)

  12. work translated into English:

  13.  major literary prize winner:



Last Edited on: 1/30/11 11:15 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Subject: Janet E.'s list
Date Posted: 12/30/2010 10:47 AM ET
Member Since: 5/15/2010
Posts: 143
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Challenge: Read 12/13 (or 6/12 for a "lite" challenge).

 Also, since 50 years seems to be a commonly accepted standard for establishing a "classic" (and because people like clarity), I'm considering "contemporary" literature anything written within the past 50 years.

 My self-imposed limitation is that my choices are on my bookshelves waiting to be read -- finally! -- and swapped for other goodies!

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc): Leonardo Sciascia.  To Each His Own .  Completed 3/27/2011  Read my review.  5 stars
  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work: John Banville. The Infinities Completed 3/3/2011 Read my review
  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: Alan Bennett. The Uncommon Reader Completed 1/2/2011. This is a sly little gem about the seductive power of reading, written by Alan Bennett who also wrote the play The History Boys. Very funny and very on point.
  4. non-fiction: Rebecca Skloot. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks   Completed 4/4/2011  (this works out well, since I am reading this for my book group in any case) 3 stars
  5. science fiction/fantasy:  Steven Millhauser. Enchanted Night  Completed 10/17/2011
  6. work by an author from a "developing" country: will possibly skip this category; not sure yet.
  7. work made into a film: not sure yet. Possibly one of the following: Barry Unsworth. Morality PlayCompleted 2/12/2011   Read my review. 5 stars  Made into a film called "The Reckoning" (2003)  -- unfortuneately, not a great movie. Jorge Amado. Donna Flor and Her Two Husbands ; Niccolo Ammaniti. I'm Not Scared ; or Sergei Lukyanenko. Nightwatch. See also #12  
  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers: Completed 10/5/2011   Marilynne Robinson. Housekeeping .
  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century: Arturo Perez-Reverte. Pirates of the Levant  Completed 1/23/11. This is the latest installment of the swashbuckling and highly addictive Captain Alatriste series.
  10. mystery/horror: Germanicus. Completed 3/22/2011  Read my review. 3.5 stars
  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays): Dick Cavett. Talk Show Completed 1/6/11. This is a collection of Cavett's blog postings that appeared on the New York Times web site. But he's not a run-of-the-mill blogger.  He elevates the mundane  blog post to well-crafted short essays. Fun read, especially for those of us who watched his memorable TV shows.
  12. work translated into English: Carlos Ruiz ZafonThe Shadow of the Wind  Completed July 11 2011
  13.  major literary prize winner: Muriel Barbery. The Elegance of the Hedgehog. Completed September 6, 2011


Last Edited on: 10/18/11 7:36 AM ET - Total times edited: 44
Subject: Great challenge!
Date Posted: 1/2/2011 10:40 PM ET
Member Since: 1/11/2010
Posts: 11
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Saving my space!

 

 

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc):

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work:

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read:

  4. non-fiction:

  5. science fiction/fantasy:

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country:

  7. work made into a film:

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century:

  10. mystery/horror:

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):

  12. work translated into English:

  13.  major literary prize winner:



 

Date Posted: 1/3/2011 5:20 AM ET
Member Since: 11/18/2009
Posts: 551
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I'm going to join this challenge--looks great! I've been shopping through your lists, so many of your choices are listed below.

1. contemporary political issue: The Zookeeper's Wife (Diane Ackerman)

2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work--The Sum of Our Days (Isabel Allende)

3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: The Uncommon Reader (Alan Bennett)

4. non-fiction: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (Rebecca Skloot)

5. science fiction/fantasy--I will skip this category

6. work by an author from a "developing" country--The Weight of Water (Thrity Umrigar)

7. work made into a film--Tell No One (Harlan Coben)

8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers--Amsterdam (Ian McEwan)

9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century--On Cold Mountain (Charles Frazier)

10. mystery/horror--The Tricking of Freya (Christina Sunley)

11. "non-novel": The Lives of the Muses (Francine Prose)

12. work translated into English--Gourmet Rhapsody (Muriel Barbery)

13. major literary prize winner: Wolf Hall (Hilary Mantel)

                                                                                       Rose



Last Edited on: 1/4/11 3:23 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 1/3/2011 9:11 AM ET
Member Since: 4/7/2007
Posts: 335
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  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc): The Imperfectionists by Tom Rachman (completed 5/11)

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work: The Girl in Hyacinth Blue by Susan Vreeland (finished 2/17/11) 2 1/2 stars

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet readThe Cookbook Collector by Allegra Goodman (finished 1/23/11) AND The Help by Kathryn Stockett (finished 1/29/11) 4 stars

  4. non-fiction: Havana Before Castro: Cuba's Playground (finished 2/13/11) 3 stars

  5. science fiction/fantasy:  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (finished 7/10/11)

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country: Paulo Coelho's The Alchemist (finished 2/12/11) 4 stars

  7. work made into a film: Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen (finished 6/6/11) 2 1/2 stars

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers: A World for Julius by Alfredo Bryce Echinique of Peru (finished 3/4/11 , 4 stars

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century: Maps and Shadows, Krysia Jopek (finished 1/3/11) Three Stars

  10. mystery/horror: Spare Change by Robert B. Parker (finished 6/21/11)

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays)

  12. work translated into English: The Oxford Murders by Guillermo Martinez (finished 1/11/11)

  13.  major literary prize winner: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz (finished 1/17/11) Four Stars

 

DONE!!!!! I am so happy to have finished this challenge because before this, I'd been reading only nonfiction. Loved it! Glad it's done.

 

 



Last Edited on: 7/11/11 7:48 PM ET - Total times edited: 13
Date Posted: 1/10/2011 10:10 AM ET
Member Since: 9/20/2008
Posts: 402
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Challenge: Read 12/13 (or 6/12 for a "lite" challenge).

Also, since 50 years seems to be a commonly accepted standard for establishing a "classic" (and because people like clarity), I'm considering "contemporary" literature anything written within the past 50 years.

 

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc): Whiteout by  Ken Follett
  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work: Justice by Larry Watson
  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
  4. non-fiction: A Child Called "IT" by David Pelzer
  5. science fiction/fantasy: Redwall by Brian Jacques
  6. work by an author from a "developing" country: Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini
  7. work made into a film: Atonement by Ian McEwan
  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers: One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century: Rules for Old Men Waiting by Peter Pouncey
  10. mystery/horror: Second Glance by Jodi Picoult
  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays):
  12. work translated into English:
  13.  major literary prize winner: The Color Purple by Alice Walker

  



Last Edited on: 1/23/11 8:52 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 1/12/2011 4:46 PM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2010
Posts: 2,139
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Joining you over here this year to try to reduce some of my TBR stacks! :) Signing up for the lite challenge - but am hoping to have enough to qualify for the full challenge by EOY. :) And luckily - or sadly, all but March is on my TBR already!  - DONE!

  1. contemporary political issue: (terrorism, immigration, etc): The Secret Life of Bees : Sue Monk Kidd (Done! 5/18/11)

  2. work by one author that alludes to an earlier work: March : Geraldine Brooks (Done! 7/5/11)

  3. work/author you keep hearing about but haven't yet read: The Hunger Games : Suzanne Collins (Done! 7/31/11)

  4. non-fiction: Fast Food Nation : Eric Schlosser (Done! 11/27/11)

  5. science fiction/fantasy: 

  6. work by an author from a "developing" country: 

  7. work made into a film: The Friday Night Knitting Club : Kate Jacobs (Done! 1/18/11)

  8. work by one of a country's greatest contemporary writers:

  9. work by a contemporary author that takes place in another century: The Forgotten Garden : Kate Morton  (Done! 3/4/11)

  10. mystery/horror: 

  11. "non-novel" (short stories, play, poetry, essays): ??

  12. work translated into English: ??

  13.  major literary prize winner: 

 



Last Edited on: 12/27/11 11:42 PM ET - Total times edited: 7
Date Posted: 1/13/2011 4:11 AM ET
Member Since: 11/18/2009
Posts: 551
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Kelly E.'s list is stupendous!

 

                                      Rose

Date Posted: 1/13/2011 9:58 AM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2010
Posts: 2,139
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Thanks Rose! I'm excited to finally read these! Some of them have been sitting on my shelf for nearly a year. Shameful!! :)

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