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Topic: 2011 Hugo Nominees Announced!

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Subject: 2011 Hugo Nominees Announced!
Date Posted: 4/24/2011 9:44 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
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The full list is here. I point you all to the nominees for "Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form". . . ;)

The best novel nominees are:

Blackout/All Clear by Connie Willis
Cryoburn by Lois McMaster Bujold
The Dervish House by Ian McDonald
Feed by Mira Grant
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

What have you read? What's on your TBR stack? Any thoughts on how this list compares to the Nebula nominees?

Date Posted: 4/24/2011 9:44 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
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I've read two (100K Kingdoms and Cryoburn), have the Willis duology on Mt. TBR, keep planning on picking up the first book in Ian McDonald's series, and have absolutely no interest in Feed. So I feel all up-to-date!

That said. . . for some reason this list strikes me as less. . . adventurous, I think, than the Nebula list. At least, less adventurous setting-wise. . . And I'm really, really surprised (given what I've heard; I haven't read it myself yet) that Nnedi Okorafor's Who Fears Death didn't get a nod!

Date Posted: 4/25/2011 10:38 AM ET
Member Since: 5/10/2009
Posts: 826
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I'm not as shocked about Who Fears Death.  In my biased opinion, the Hugo awards generally seem slanted toward sci-fi rather than fantasy, especially in the nominees.  (And yes, I'm fully aware that there's been plenty of fantasy winners in recent years.  I still can't shake that sci-fi impression.  Maybe it's the trophy?) And though Who Fears Death is set in a post-apocalyptic future with technology we don't have now, it's almost ignored throughout the book, so it is more like a fantasy.  I will, however, be shocked if it doesn't get a nod at the Mythopoeic Awards.  It just seems like that style of book to me.

I greatly enjoyed both Cryoburn and The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms.  I keep hearing good things about Connie Willis.  I really need to read something by her one of these days.  I have To Say Nothing of the Dog and Fire Watch on Mt. TBR.  I'm going to try to get through those before adding anything else by her.  The other two just don't interest me at all.

Compared to the Nebula award, yes, I guess a bit less varied in setting.  But also a lot more sci-fi slanted.  1/5 is a fantasy here, whereas 4/6 were fantasies in the Nebula awards.

And by you pointing us at the short form dramatic presentations, should we conclude that you're a Dr. Who fan?

Date Posted: 4/25/2011 12:14 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2009
Posts: 1,376
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LOL, no, it's something slightly lower down that list. . . the YouTube entry. ;D

(It doesn't say "YouTube" in the entry, but it doesn't list the studio that produced it because there wasn't a studio. It was just something that made me giggle a few months back and so I was kind of delighted that the voters had a whimsical enough sense of humor to give it a Hugo nom.)

 

I suppose it is more a more SF-oriented list, which I also associate the Hugo with being. . . but if there was only going to be one fantasy novel, I would have expected it to be Who Fears Death over The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms. No, that's not true, because it does seem like 100K Kingdoms is more popular. . . hrm. I dunno. Just took me by surprise. :)



Last Edited on: 4/25/11 12:18 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 4/25/2011 12:48 PM ET
Member Since: 5/10/2009
Posts: 826
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Oh, really?  I'll have to make a trip to YouTube then.  That's amusing. 

Both The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms and Who Fears Death have their strengths.  The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is more action oriented and has a more unusual plot/world, whereas Who Fears Death is more of a standard bildungsroman but has a great narrative voice and connection to current cultures.  That's not to say that Who Fears Death has no action at all.  It has quite a bit, but the focus is on the culture and style.  It's a bit more literary.  That isn't a great way of putting it, but I can't think of another way to describe it right now.

IMO, plot & action seems to win with the Hugos.  And yes, I'm fully aware that there are several Hugo awards/nominees that are there more for style than plot, but as I pointed out before, my opinion is a bit biased.