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The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
Author: Sherman Alexie, Ellen Forney (Illustrator)
Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, <...  more »
ISBN-13: 9780316013697
ISBN-10: 0316013692
Publication Date: 10/1/2008
Pages: 288
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 131

4.2 stars, based on 131 ratings
Publisher: Little, Brown Young Readers
Book Type: Paperback
Other Versions: Hardcover, Audio Cassette, Audio CD
Members Wishing: 11
Reviews: Member | Amazon | Write a Review

Top Member Book Reviews

reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 16 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
A great story about the struggles one boy has between his heritage and his future. I read this book because it was chosen as the Spokane Reads title this year. Since this story takes place on the Spokane Indian Reservation it made a lot of sense that it would be picked for our area and it was fun reading about places that are familiar but that was not what made it a great read. I would have thoroughly enjoyed this book no matter where it was set and would recommend it to anyone. I checked it out of the library but I have added it to my wish list as this is one I need to have on my Keep Forever and Ever shelf.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 7145 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
Reviewed by Cat for TeensReadToo.com

I'll admit -- I put off reading THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY OF A PART-TIME INDIAN for well over a year, in favor of more "exciting" books. Boy, what a mistake I made!

Told from the perspective of thirteen-year-old Arnold Spirit, an intelligent, observant, sarcastic Indian born with encephalitis and a love of cartooning, Sherman Alexie takes us along with him as he moves away from a circumscribed, oppressive life on the Spokane reservation towards a more promising future by attending an all-white school thirty miles away.

Never one to get bogged down in sentiment or self-pity, Mr. Alexie refuses to present Arnold's friends and family as one-dimensional stereotypes, nor is the world beyond "rez" borders portrayed as the Great White Hope. Arnold's family has problems, to be sure: an alcoholic father, an enabling, codependent mother; a near shut-in older sister. But their love for each other is evident through their words and actions. And despite the ostracism and ridicule heaped upon him by former friends and other tribe members, Arnold reacts with biting wit rather than total despair.

This has to be one of the best books I've ever read in my life, so I hope everyone gives it a try.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 129 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
I'm not sure what I was expecting when I picked up "Absolutely True..."

I guess I wasn't expecting an Indian version of "Diary of a Wimpy Kid." That's what I got however.

Even though Sherman Alexie's "Diary" is quite a bit more seriously-themed than "DoaWK," it has the same sort of tone and illistrations/cartoons to go along with the story.

While "DoaWK" is aimed more towards third - fifth grade reading levels, "Part time Indian" deals with pretty serious subject matters so I wouldn't give this book to a third grader to read even if the reading level is pretty spot on for that grade.

Alexie goes into issues of alcoholism, sex, and eating disorders. Really I don't feel kids under middle school age should read this book. It's a GOOD book, don't get me wrong. I enjoyed reading about Alexie's struggles and the challenges he had to face as a native american in the modern era.

So while "DofaPTI" is written in a kid-like format, it's definitely not "kid" reading.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 7145 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Reviewed by Cat for TeensReadToo.com

I'll admit -- I put off reading THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY OF A PART-TIME INDIAN for well over a year, in favor of more "exciting" books. Boy, what a mistake I made!

Told from the perspective of thirteen-year-old Arnold Spirit, an intelligent, observant, sarcastic Indian born with encephalitis and a love of cartooning, Sherman Alexie takes us along with him as he moves away from a circumscribed, oppressive life on the Spokane reservation towards a more promising future by attending an all-white school thirty miles away.

Never one to get bogged down in sentiment or self-pity, Mr. Alexie refuses to present Arnold's friends and family as one-dimensional stereotypes, nor is the world beyond "rez" borders portrayed as the Great White Hope. Arnold's family has problems, to be sure: an alcoholic father, an enabling, codependent mother; a near shut-in older sister. But their love for each other is evident through their words and actions. And despite the ostracism and ridicule heaped upon him by former friends and other tribe members, Arnold reacts with biting wit rather than total despair.

This has to be one of the best books I've ever read in my life, so I hope everyone gives it a try.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 34 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This young adult novel is an entertaining read with lots of topics to consider. An engaging tale that is very real to life.
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reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 151 more book reviews
Junior lives on the Spokane (Washington) Indian reservation. Hes kind of a runt and is picked on by everyone on the rez except his best friend. Until he decides to attend the all-white school to get a better education. Then, his best friend turns on him.

He gets by through his comics and humor, living in an Indian world that no longer accepts him because he attends the all-white school (where he is a pretty good basketball player) and trying to gain acceptance at an all-white school that doesnt want to accept him because hes an Indian.

I loved this semi-autobiographical account of growing up in two worlds. Junior attacks his life with aplomb in some of the most trying circumstances like dealing with bullies and crushes on girls.

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