Book Reviews of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
Author: Sherman Alexie
ISBN-13: 9780316013680
ISBN-10: 0316013684
Publication Date: 9/12/2007
Pages: 240
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 92

4.2 stars, based on 92 ratings
Publisher: Little, Brown Young Readers
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

24 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 16 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
A great story about the struggles one boy has between his heritage and his future. I read this book because it was chosen as the Spokane Reads title this year. Since this story takes place on the Spokane Indian Reservation it made a lot of sense that it would be picked for our area and it was fun reading about places that are familiar but that was not what made it a great read. I would have thoroughly enjoyed this book no matter where it was set and would recommend it to anyone. I checked it out of the library but I have added it to my wish list as this is one I need to have on my Keep Forever and Ever shelf.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 7145 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
Reviewed by Cat for TeensReadToo.com

I'll admit -- I put off reading THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY OF A PART-TIME INDIAN for well over a year, in favor of more "exciting" books. Boy, what a mistake I made!

Told from the perspective of thirteen-year-old Arnold Spirit, an intelligent, observant, sarcastic Indian born with encephalitis and a love of cartooning, Sherman Alexie takes us along with him as he moves away from a circumscribed, oppressive life on the Spokane reservation towards a more promising future by attending an all-white school thirty miles away.

Never one to get bogged down in sentiment or self-pity, Mr. Alexie refuses to present Arnold's friends and family as one-dimensional stereotypes, nor is the world beyond "rez" borders portrayed as the Great White Hope. Arnold's family has problems, to be sure: an alcoholic father, an enabling, codependent mother; a near shut-in older sister. But their love for each other is evident through their words and actions. And despite the ostracism and ridicule heaped upon him by former friends and other tribe members, Arnold reacts with biting wit rather than total despair.

This has to be one of the best books I've ever read in my life, so I hope everyone gives it a try.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 129 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
I'm not sure what I was expecting when I picked up "Absolutely True..."

I guess I wasn't expecting an Indian version of "Diary of a Wimpy Kid." That's what I got however.

Even though Sherman Alexie's "Diary" is quite a bit more seriously-themed than "DoaWK," it has the same sort of tone and illistrations/cartoons to go along with the story.

While "DoaWK" is aimed more towards third - fifth grade reading levels, "Part time Indian" deals with pretty serious subject matters so I wouldn't give this book to a third grader to read even if the reading level is pretty spot on for that grade.

Alexie goes into issues of alcoholism, sex, and eating disorders. Really I don't feel kids under middle school age should read this book. It's a GOOD book, don't get me wrong. I enjoyed reading about Alexie's struggles and the challenges he had to face as a native american in the modern era.

So while "DofaPTI" is written in a kid-like format, it's definitely not "kid" reading.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 7145 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Reviewed by Cat for TeensReadToo.com

I'll admit -- I put off reading THE ABSOLUTELY TRUE DIARY OF A PART-TIME INDIAN for well over a year, in favor of more "exciting" books. Boy, what a mistake I made!

Told from the perspective of thirteen-year-old Arnold Spirit, an intelligent, observant, sarcastic Indian born with encephalitis and a love of cartooning, Sherman Alexie takes us along with him as he moves away from a circumscribed, oppressive life on the Spokane reservation towards a more promising future by attending an all-white school thirty miles away.

Never one to get bogged down in sentiment or self-pity, Mr. Alexie refuses to present Arnold's friends and family as one-dimensional stereotypes, nor is the world beyond "rez" borders portrayed as the Great White Hope. Arnold's family has problems, to be sure: an alcoholic father, an enabling, codependent mother; a near shut-in older sister. But their love for each other is evident through their words and actions. And despite the ostracism and ridicule heaped upon him by former friends and other tribe members, Arnold reacts with biting wit rather than total despair.

This has to be one of the best books I've ever read in my life, so I hope everyone gives it a try.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on
Helpful Score: 1
This is a powerful story. It is hopeful, insightful and honest about racism, poverty, being an outsider and the unique American Indian experience. As a 60+ Year old I was surprised how much I got out of a short book that is easily accessible to teens.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 34 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This young adult novel is an entertaining read with lots of topics to consider. An engaging tale that is very real to life.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 36 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Very enjoyable look of reservation life for a teenager versus attending a white high school. Loved that it was funny, poignant, but not sugar-coated! Memorable characters.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 5 more book reviews
Not appropriate for children or teenagers. I don't care how well written or highly-rated. Got rid of it after reading just a couple of chapters. Do not get this for yourself or your student!
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on + 422 more book reviews
I read this for a theme challenge in my online book club, The Reading Cove. November 2012's theme was "Indian."

This is Junior's coming-of-age story. He's a teenager growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation in Washington State, who decides to transfer to a white school off his reservation.

I enjoyed the first few chapters quite a bit. There were lots of laugh-out-loud funny anecdotes in the narration. It was also interesting to read about life on a modern-day Indian reservation and what it's like from a 14-year-old boy's point-of-view. I found the humorous narrative crisp, clever and easy to follow.

Most of the illustrations throughout the story were also hilarious and very entertaining.

And while the tone became darker and more serious, with a number of tragic things happening in Junior and his family's life, I must say that I did begin to lose interest by the halfway point. Junior's woes at school with friends, his relationship with his best friend on the rez, etc. just got a bit boring to me.

Overall, I do think this read has appeal for a teen audience.
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Quick easy read, very amusing. A sad story, but told in a hopeful way. Illustrations are great!
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Junior lives on the Spokane (Washington) Indian reservation. Hes kind of a runt and is picked on by everyone on the rez except his best friend. Until he decides to attend the all-white school to get a better education. Then, his best friend turns on him.

He gets by through his comics and humor, living in an Indian world that no longer accepts him because he attends the all-white school (where he is a pretty good basketball player) and trying to gain acceptance at an all-white school that doesnt want to accept him because hes an Indian.

I loved this semi-autobiographical account of growing up in two worlds. Junior attacks his life with aplomb in some of the most trying circumstances like dealing with bullies and crushes on girls.
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This is one of my favorite Alexie books, realistic, simple, and straightforward. Evidently he intended it as an offering to teens or youth, but it holds up well for adult reading. The narrator decides to advance his education by attending the 'white' school, off the Indian reservation. Though it's filled with race relations and situations it doesn't get stereotypical or self-pitying. We cheer for the hero as he adjusts his attitude and as he experiences a year which is both triumphant and very heart-breaking. It did lack those flights of fantasy and vision which I think of as his trademark - but we get cartoons of the action instead! And they are really good.
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This book is fun! Sure it's got some serious moments, but overall it's a lot of fun and something you will want to read as fast as you can.
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This was hilarious, heartwarming...heart-wrenching!

Excellent book. It makes you appreciate the opportunities you have in life, and feel somewhat ashamed for the ones you've squandered.
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This was a very entertaining and illuminating book. I have not read very many books about Native Americans in modern times, and this book really gives some insight as to what life is like on reservations. It also is a great coming of age story.
reviewed The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian on
highly entertaining. But, also makes you think.
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Junior discovers that he's pretty smart for an Indian boy living on the Spokane Indian Reservation. His teacher helps him to be true to himself, even after their classroom altercation. He finds himself breaking out of the mold and going to an all white farm town school. He doesn't fit in either world to begin with. And so this is his journey to survive high school while living on the rez!
Junior draws his cartoons and gives the story as he sees it from a teenage boys perspective!
A beautiful coming of age story.
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What a quick and amazing read. I laughed. I learned. I thought about crying. But I didn't cry. I have a rule against crying while reading teen fiction. Although this is not a book purely about basketball, it reminded me of that great story by Gary Smith about a team on an Indian reservation in Montana ... except much funnier. Sherman Alexie is a singular voice to be sure.
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Great book, great read. Very different from the average book. Try it, you'll like it.
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I loved this book. I was half way through it before I was told it was a YA book. It didn't matter at all. It is sometimes funny, often heart breaking and always beautifully written. I haven't been able to part with the book yet.
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Sherman Alexie has quickly become my favorite author. I didn't discover him until last year, but what amazing, human, visceral, beautiful, and truly American stories.
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It's a good story that honestly depicts life in a reservation, as a teenage boy. Full of emotion and shock, read this book within a few days because it was highly entertaining.
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quick interesting read
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I am disappointed to see that this book won a National Book Award. What a shame, their criteria must not be very particular. While the book had great potential it was ruined by the pervasive foul language and the fixation on masturbation. If you are a Christian who desires to set nothing wicked before your eyes (Psalm 101:3) I recommend you choose another book. For more information go to http://YAfortheWise.blogspot.com.