Book Reviews of Accelerando

Accelerando
Accelerando
Author: Charles Stross
ISBN-13: 9780441012848
ISBN-10: 0441012841
Publication Date: 7/5/2005
Pages: 389
Rating:
  • Currently 3.3/5 Stars.
 23

3.3 stars, based on 23 ratings
Publisher: Ace Books
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

8 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Accelerando on + 14 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 5
This was an exhausting, but rewarding, book to read. It is incredibly dense, with lots and LOTS of stuff going on at all times. I had to take breaks and read entire other books between spates of this one. The frenetic pace and sheer density of Cool Stuff in his worldbuilding reminded me of Neal Stephenson, especially Snow Crash and Cryptonomicon.
reviewed Accelerando on + 774 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
From the book itself:

"An old-fashioned book, covering 3 generations, living through interesting times... A work of postmodern history, the incoherent school at that - how do you document people who fork their identities at random, spend years dead before reappearing on the stage, and have arguments with their own relativistically preserved other copy? ... I thought that perhaps as a narrative hook I'd make the offstage viewpoint that of the family's robot cat."

Yep. That about sums it up.
(That quote is not from the blurb, btw, but from within the text.)

It's an ambitious book - but, overall, an annoying one. It's so self-consciously uber-hip, saturated with today's geek-speak. Although it aims to be a sort of "accelerated future-history," it already feels dated. The story - such as it is - really takes a back seat to the concepts - which could be OK, except that the concepts are really quite unbelievable, to the point of being uninteresting.
reviewed Accelerando on + 14 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This was an exhausting, but rewarding, book to read. It is incredibly dense, with lots and LOTS of stuff going on at all times. I had to take breaks and read entire other books between spates of this one. The frenetic pace and sheer density of Cool Stuff in his worldbuilding reminded me of Neal Stephenson, especially Snow Crash and Cryptonomicon.
reviewed Accelerando on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Cutting edge high-tech Sci-fi, especially of interest to those who like computers and are interested in the Singularity.
reviewed Accelerando on + 204 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This was an odd novel... It clearly shows its roots as a series of connected short stories; each of the first three chapters especially --- they all have a clear narrative arc with satisfying conclusions when they finish. It isn't until later in the book that things start to actually look like a novel.

The book also has an odd metamorphosis, as the narrative starts in the near future and then moves along to post-singularity humanity. Kind of by definition, that means that I can relate to the people in the start of the book, but by the end there's so much hand-waving about how things work, that that ability to relate has faded significantly. It wound up giving me an odd response at the end of the book: while I was still very interested in the story, I really wanted it to hurry up and end!

Ultimately, it was a good read, and I think Stross actually did a good job extrapolating out what the future might hold, even if it is mostly hand-waving. He makes interesting characters (for the most part), and kept finding ways to keep his humans puzzling out their issues.

It wasn't my favorite Stross book, but it was solid. 4/5 stars.
reviewed Accelerando on + 25 more book reviews
This book starts off at an accelerated pace (yes, pun intended), and then keeps accelerating. I felt like I was on a bad carnival ride, and couldn't wait for it to stop.

The characters were relatively well done, with plenty to empathize with, but it kept getting more and more frantic, until I finally just gave up and stopped reading. It wasn't the writing style, but the introduction of new concepts and morphing of existing concepts to new ideas.

If you like this genre (not really science fiction, but maybe post-cyberpunk?), it is supposedly one of the best -- it won quite a few awards, and continues to be popular. Just remember to pace yourself; this was written as nine separate stories, and can be digested best bite-by-bite.

If you are more of a near-future science fiction lover, or you like to see how the worlds work (e.g. Niven's Ringworld), then I'd skip this book.
reviewed Accelerando on + 12 more book reviews
Did not finish reading
reviewed Accelerando on + 3 more book reviews
The Singularity. It is the era of the post human.