Search - The Admiral's Penniless Bride (Harlequin Historical, No 1025)

The Admiral's Penniless Bride (Harlequin Historical, No 1025)
The Admiral's Penniless Bride - Harlequin Historical, No 1025
Author: Carla Kelly
IT'S MARRIAGE OR THE WORKHOUSE! — Sally Paul is down to her last penny. As she spends it on a cup of tea -- to stave off being at the mercy of the workhouse -- the last thing she expects is an offer of marriage...from a complete stranger! — Admiral Sir Charles Bright's seafaring days are over -- according to society, that must mean he'...  more »
ISBN-13: 9780373296255
ISBN-10: 0373296258
Publication Date: 1/1/2011
Pages: 288
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 58

4.1 stars, based on 58 ratings
Publisher: Harlequin
Book Type: Mass Market Paperback
Reviews: Member | Amazon | Write a Review

Top Member Book Reviews

reviewed The Admiral's Penniless Bride (Harlequin Historical, No 1025) on + 6 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This book was a great read throughout--interesting, believable and sympathetic hero and heroine with a believable relationship development. I was impressed
with how the author maintained the pace and kept my interest--many regencies tend to start out strong and then flag, but this story was consistently captivating with a satisfying conclusion.
reviewed The Admiral's Penniless Bride (Harlequin Historical, No 1025) on + 364 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Synopsis from Amazon: "Sally Paul is down to her last penny. As she spends it on a cup of teato stave off being at the mercy of the workhousethe last thing she expects is an offer of marriagefrom a complete stranger!
Admiral Sir Charles Bright's seafaring days are overand according to society, that must mean he's in need of a wife! Discovering Sally's in need of a home, he offers a solution. They marry in hastebut will they enjoy their wedding night at leisure?"

Good, but not one of Carla Kelly's best. As ever, her writing is good. I enjoy the dialog, and the way she gets into both the H&H's heads. Also there is a lot of realism in her historicals, you see the underside of those days. In this book, she touches on child abuse, anti-Semitism and political corruption. And just like real life, some problems can never be fixed, even though there is a HEA for the main characters.
So what didn't I like? Well, there was too much crying. The heroine cries, the hero cries, at various times just about every other character gets at least teary-eyed. Yeah, they both had tragic things happen in their lives, and I get it that a strong man can cry. But once or twice would be enough to show us that he's not afraid to show his emotions. This guy busted out in tears more than John Boehner.

If you're a fan of Carla Kelly you can overlook it. I'm glad I read the book, and I enjoyed it, it's just not a keeper for me.
reviewed The Admiral's Penniless Bride (Harlequin Historical, No 1025) on + 10 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I usually do not care for regency romances at all. But I have to say that I loved this book. I enjoyed more than anything I've read recently.
reviewed The Admiral's Penniless Bride (Harlequin Historical, No 1025) on + 1166 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This charming story is about a woman who is destined to go to the workhouse because she is down-on-her-luck and can find no work. As a last defiant gesture, Sally Paul walks into The Drake and has a cup of tea.

Admiral Sir Charles Bright's seafaring days are over and according to society, that must mean he's in need of a wife (famous line from PRIDE AND PREJUDICE). Charles Bright has two older, domineering sisters who are throwing eligible females his way. Charles thinks he can do a better job; he has agreed to meet a young woman (sister to one of his sea companions) at The Drake and marry.

Charles obviously doesnt think much of his intended; he refers to her as The Mouse. When The Mouse fails to appear, Charles looks around and sees an attractive, (if shabbily dressed) woman who is obviously in some difficulty. The waiter wants to throw her out; she is drinking her tea as slowly as possible.

Charles strikes up a conversation with her and tells her his plight. He makes her an offer of a marriage of convenience. Sally sees at once that it would be a solution short of the workhouse but declines. She leaves and looks for a quiet place to spend the night. As she is making herself comfortable in a pew of a local church, Charles arrives and sits nearby. He renews his offer and Sally reluctantly agrees.

Both of the main characters are well-drawn and are extremely likeable; Charles is a wit and Sally has a good sense of humor and a strong sense of humility and humanity. They fit well together.

However, Sally has a desperate secret and she decides not to tell Charles until later. She does tell Charles that she was married before and had a son (who died because she could not earn enough to keep her small son warm). She also tells Charles that her husband committed suicide.

When someone mentions suicide, most polite folks immediately drop the subject. Thus, Charles does not know the reason for the suicide. This is a warm and gentle story; however I had a problem with all the crying (men, women and children). On the positive side, Mrs. Kelly gives an accurate view of the child abuse and anti-Semitism that was part of Regency life in England.
Read All 6 Book Reviews of "The Admirals Penniless Bride Harlequin Historical No 1025"

Please Log in to Rate these Book Reviews

reviewed The Admiral's Penniless Bride (Harlequin Historical, No 1025) on + 523 more book reviews
At first, this story seemed agonizingly slow. Sophia and Charles (the Admiral) truly meant to stick to a marriage of convenience so things were a little stilted at first. They were absorbing characters, but I could see how their banter, although sometimes overlong, was the author's way of them getting to know each other in a more average sort of way. It wasn't until more than halfway through that the story really started to pick up where I could see and feel their emotional investment each contributed to the marriage. And then the waterworks began to flow and I could feel the anguish of being prematurely judged. Overall, it turned out to be a wonderful love story, albeit more subdued, almost quiet, but definitely a powerful testament to the healing balm of love, forgiveness, and second chances. 3.8 stars.


Genres: