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Topic: Adobe to Require New Epub DRM in July, Expects to Abandon Existing Users

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Subject: Adobe to Require New Epub DRM in July, Expects to Abandon Existing Users
Date Posted: 2/4/2014 10:29 AM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
Posts: 7,977
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Adobe to Require New Epub DRM in July, Expects to Abandon Existing Users

 

Here

 

This means that any app or device which still uses the older Adobe DRM will be cut off. Luckily for many users, that penalty probably will not affect readers who use Kobo or Google reading apps or devices; to the best of my knowledge neither uses the Adobe DRM internally. And of course Kindle and Apple customers won’t even notice, thanks to those companies’ wise decision to use their own DRM.

But everyone else just got screwed.

Which means that until new cracks come out, you'll only be able to read the new DRM'd books on devices that have been upgraded to open the new security system. Which could be immediatly, or never. And other companies will have to pay to upgrade their apps/systems to handle the new DRM.

Which really may affect Overdrive quite a bit.

Subject: A quick Change of Heart ....
Date Posted: 2/4/2014 9:59 PM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
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Looks like Adobe has changed their minds on the roll-out of their new DRM and supporting older firmware and models that can't be updated for the new one...

Here.

After receiving feedback from customers and webinar attendees, Adobe has revised the migration timetable for customers.  “Adobe does not plan to stop support for ACS 4 or RMSDK 9.  ACS 5 books will be delivered to the older RMSDK 9 based readers”, according to Shameer Ayyappan, Senior Product Manager at Adobe.  “We will let our resellers and publishers decide when they wish to set the DRM flag on ACS 5, thus enforcing the need for RMSDK 10 based readers.”

Date Posted: 2/4/2014 10:17 PM ET
Member Since: 10/30/2006
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The day they do is the day I buy a Kindle. I've actually been waiting for B&N to kill the Nook for some time so I haven't purchased anything there in a while. It would be a PITA to have two ereaders.

Date Posted: 2/4/2014 10:45 PM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
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I send all my Adobe books into Calibre as it is.   Don't trust Adobe.  They are designed for the businesses, not the readers. 
 

Date Posted: 2/5/2014 7:19 PM ET
Member Since: 2/24/2006
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How will that affect the reader apps I wonder?  I have a Nexus 7 and sometimes use the Nook and Kobo and Kindle apps rather than my Nook,.

Date Posted: 2/6/2014 12:44 AM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
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I don't think it will matter with the kindle app at all.  They have their own DRM.  

What I've read is that Kobo does not use the Adobe inside their software.

Nook?  Heck, their credit card based DRM is already giving me fits.  

Date Posted: 2/6/2014 6:46 AM ET
Member Since: 10/30/2006
Posts: 8,426
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They appear to have backed off. They're now saying that it will be the publishers and libraries(Overdrive)'s decision if they want the more advanced DRM on their titles. I can't see either of them doing that. Publishers know libraries heavily invested in Nooks for checkout and they won't chance that as libraries purchase too many hardcovers. But, the old tale of VHS and Beta Max or DVD vs. Blu Ray, looks like we're all going to go Kindle at one time or another. Jeff wins.

Date Posted: 2/6/2014 9:35 AM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
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They're now saying that it will be the publishers and libraries(Overdrive)'s decision if they want the more advanced DRM on their titles.

I think it will be the publishers who ultimately decide. Libraries won't have a choice if publishers want the extra-strength DRM or no ebooks get loaned. (They're not real hot about library sales anyway. They're not convinced that libraries aren't costing them sales. It would give them a good excuse to get out of the ebook/library business all together.)

Adobe sells security for ebooks and a reading platform. Adobe has been freaked out since Tor went DRM'less in 2012 and hasn't seen any increase in piracy. Smashwords and Baen don't seem to have a problem either.

So they need to push their DRM platform to the other publishers, with promises of less piracy in order to keep their ebook security business making money. If everyone goes DRM'less, then they have nothing but a reading platform to sell, and it ain't all that hot.

 And I think that most publishers are still of the mindset that they have to have it or lose sales. So I don't trust them not to screw this up big time, as they're hoping to keep making money off of people who want their ebooks tied down.

I wouldn't trust them at all at this point.

Date Posted: 2/6/2014 7:42 PM ET
Member Since: 2/12/2008
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"I send all my Adobe books into Calibre as it is."  

Me too. I prefer to read everything in simple PDF format as I like to scroll down pages rather than "flipping" pages. And in the process of the conversion, it strips off the DRM. The up side is that I don't have to deal with these DRM problems down the road.

 

Date Posted: 2/7/2014 8:48 AM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
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You won't be able to strip any new DRM off any format unless someone behind the scenes developers a crack for it. Which may or may not be possible. So be aware that what ever you buy through Adobe after the switch over to the new DRM may end up being permanently locked. 

 

Date Posted: 2/7/2014 9:36 AM ET
Member Since: 7/12/2010
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Bad move by Adobe, just pissing off customers.  The previous Adobe DRM was cracked and no doubt this one will suffer the same fate.  So why would Adobe piss off customers knowing full well the new DRM is just a hop skip and a jump away from being cracked?

Accept it Adobe and stop alienating your shrinking customer base.

-RD

Date Posted: 2/7/2014 9:57 AM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
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Accept it Adobe and stop alienating your shrinking customer base.

Their Customer base really hasn't shrunken much, other than TOR going DRM'less. 

Readers aren't their real customer base. The publishers/Authors who buy into their security services are. And many of them still believe that they need DRM or lose sales. They make money selling the DRM services, then charging yearly renewal fees, and the per-book covered by the DRM.

You can read an older discussion here.

Until companies do the math and figure they'll be saving money by dumping DRM all together, then Adobe will do what ever they feel they must to make their customers happy. Which now means promising harder-to-crack DRM for those who use their services.

They have to promise something new to keep their customers coming in and paying a lot of money.

 

Date Posted: 2/7/2014 12:32 PM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
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Adobe thinks the customer is the publishers, not the readers.  Can they make a worse website for reader access? 

Date Posted: 2/9/2014 10:28 AM ET
Member Since: 11/28/2010
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I've read this thread and the link.  Most of this is going right over my head.   I have a Nook glowlight.  I have books I have purchased on my nook, and I borrow nook books from the library(s).  One of the lending libraries is Overdrive and one is Freading.

Does this mean I will not be able to 

1) read my own purchased books on my nook

and 

2) borrow nook books from the library?

Date Posted: 2/9/2014 11:19 AM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
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I've read this thread and the link.  Most of this is going right over my head. 

There's a lot of variables since there are a lot of formats and different ebook readers. So answers will be different for everyone and most stores that use Adobe to lock their ebooks. No one really knows at this point how well the process will work.

1) read my own purchased books on my nook

It depends. What format books are you putting on your nook? From what store? 

If they're from B&N with DRM, then there might be a bit of a delay unless B&N can send out updates to all the Nooks so they will recognize the new DRM and be able to open the book. Once an update is installed, you should be able to open any new books you download and open them easily. The books already on your device may need to be downloaded again, depending if B&N's update will allow the older DRM to work as well as the new.

If you're loading DRM'less epub, they should open fine, as long as B&N doesn't remove the Epub option. 

If Adobe changes the lock on the ebooks they handle, then B&N will have to make sure their customers get the right key to open them. There's just no telling how easy/hard that will be. Could be seamless, could be a train wreck.

2) borrow nook books from the library?

It will depend on the Overdrive and what they decide to do. Overdrive can decide not to have Adobe put the new lock on books loaned through them and stick with the older system. But they can't do anything about what machines their borrowers own or updates to those machines.

Some people, with older machines, may never get updates. I have a couple of Sony's. For those who haven't heard. Sony is getting out of the PC, eReader and Ebook store business and sending their customers to Kobo. Sony is walking away from their old machines, so I will never get a new update for them. Kobo will be worried about their old machines, not Sony's. Lot's of people will be stuck like that.

(If you have anything in your library at the Sony store, download it now. Then make an account at the Kobo store. They say they will be switching your purchased books to Kobo. I had a large library at Fictionwise when B&N shut them down, and my purchased books went to my library in B&N. Took a few months, and not all books transferred. So don't assume all will go well. Keep a copy yourself.)

 

 

Date Posted: 2/9/2014 11:57 AM ET
Member Since: 7/14/2007
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So don't assume all will go well. Keep a copy yourself.

Best advice in the entire thread.  I load everything into Calibre, and have it backed up on Carbonite. 

Apple and Kobo don't seem like big players in the ebook market, but I understand that they're far more popular outside of the US. And when you're talking about a digital download, it really doesn't matter what country it came from.  FWIW - I got this info from an author who sells quite a bit overseas.