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Topic: anybody home?

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Subject: anybody home?
Date Posted: 1/26/2014 1:43 PM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 2,823
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smiley
 

Date Posted: 1/26/2014 6:53 PM ET
Member Since: 2/16/2009
Posts: 483
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Yep, I'm here!  I've been working on Robert Louis Stevenson's short stories.  I read "Thrawn Janet" last night and it was verrrry creepy!  At least I think it was, it was written in a very heavy Scottish dialect, lol!  BTW, "thrawn" means twisted.  Brrrrr!



Last Edited on: 1/26/14 11:36 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 1/26/2014 8:27 PM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
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I read Travels with a Donkey by Stevenson last year. I was lost the whole time. I wish there had been a map to show where he was.

Date Posted: 1/28/2014 12:59 PM ET
Member Since: 9/25/2006
Posts: 314
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Do vintage mysteries count as classics? In the last couple weeks I'fve read Too Many Cooks (Rex Stout), The Case of the Sun Bather's Diary (Gardner), and the verry creepy The Beast Must Die (Nicholas Blake / Cecil Day Lewis). I'm very slowly getting through Look Homeward Angel. I like it but only if I can really settle down with it for an hour or two.

Date Posted: 1/28/2014 6:24 PM ET
Member Since: 11/18/2009
Posts: 551
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I keep a lot of books going at a time, but am focusing on these three: The Goldfinch (I adore Donna Tartt's writing), Dr. Zhivago (for the Classics Challenge), and a Dan Brown book (for last year's Contemporary Challenge) that is killing me.

                                                                                                                Rose

Date Posted: 1/29/2014 5:18 AM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 2,823
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I finally had a chance to read The Thin Man by D Hammett. very enjoyable. Some of the dialog between Nick and Nora was laugh out loud funny.

Also read The Glass Key by Hammett. A different type of mystery. I saw the movie many years ago. I would like to see the movie now that I have read the book.

Finished Out by Natsuo Kirino. only luke warm response. Okay but I won't be looking for anything else of her's.

Date Posted: 2/6/2014 11:29 PM ET
Member Since: 2/16/2009
Posts: 483
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Just checking in to say I have started to read Cranfield by Elizabeth Gaskell (book I regard as short category for the challenge) and I am enjoying it immensely.  So far it has a feel of the Lucia books by E.F. Benson but perhaps not as snarky.  

Matt - I believe classic mysteries count!  I loved Too Many Cooks, it's one of my favorite Nero Wolfe stories.  I am going to have to look into The Beast Must Die, it sounds intriguing!

Date Posted: 2/7/2014 12:16 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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I'm on a brief vacation Down South, and I travelled so 'light' I didn't even bring a book along!   When I return home, I'll finish up the last eighty pages or so of Jumpha Lahiri's The Lowlands, but that's for the World Lit Challenge I'm also doing.  I knew I'd find something good to read here where I'm staying, and it turned out to be an autobiography of a young Togolese woman who ran away from female gental mutilation and forced marriage to a man thirty years her senior back in Togo.  It's entitled Do They Hear You When You Cry?, by Fauziya Kassindja.

Date Posted: 2/7/2014 12:47 PM ET
Member Since: 4/9/2008
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My 13 yr old loves the Thin Man movies. 

I'm reading The Brothers Karamazov for my classic. It's...fascinating. like all the worse parts of family reunions on my inlaws side, only, grateful to say, my in laws aren't quite so bad.

Date Posted: 2/9/2014 12:15 PM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2009
Posts: 25,000
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I am waiting for my library copy of Elmore Leonard's western short stories. Finished Tess of the d' Urbervilles.

 

Bonnie, I like Jumpha Lahiri's writing. Let me know if The Lowlands is any good. My library is pushing it hard right now.

Date Posted: 2/11/2014 3:45 PM ET
Member Since: 9/25/2006
Posts: 314
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Thin Man movies.appeal to my inner 13-year-old too. In the nightclub when the mug solemnly says, "I don’t like a dame that gets noisy after she’s had a few snifters!” the "looking askance" on Myrna Loy / Nora's face is priceless.

Date Posted: 2/12/2014 3:29 PM ET
Member Since: 4/9/2008
Posts: 550
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Hee hee, there are so many good lines in those movies. I suspect my entire family enjoys them, though two probably wouldn't admit it. No space ships, you see... ;)

Date Posted: 2/12/2014 4:22 PM ET
Member Since: 9/14/2009
Posts: 611
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I adore the old 'Thin Man' movies, as Powell and Loy are two of my favorite actors from the older days. I just never get tired of watching them, because they always make me smile. Loy just kills me with some of those looks she gives!

 

Subject: At home and reading
Date Posted: 2/17/2014 12:01 AM ET
Member Since: 11/15/2011
Posts: 56
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I  finished The Dead Secret by Wilkie Collins just minutes ago.  A satisfying puzzle-romance.

Onward to my other two challenge books for February--Biography and Contemporary Lit.

What a great winter for reading--as long as one has a stack of books and doesn't have to go anywhere!   

Date Posted: 2/18/2014 6:14 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Yes, Ma'am, bookmarm---I only had to send The Old Man out into this Ohio winter twice, briefly---first to pick up The Lowland, by Jumpha Lahiri, when the library notified me my name had gotten to the top of the 'reserve' list, and ditto a week or so later for The Ladies' Paradise (Au Bonheur des Dames), by Emile Zola.   I'm enjoying the second-named book now, and wondering if Zola or the translator, Brian Nelson, should get the credit for its being very readable by a 21st century reader.  My only quibble thus far (almost halfway through) is the use of the idioms  "sucking up to" and "get lost".   Somehow I don't believe the French language in use in 1883 had those American-sounding expressions . . . .This  is the novel that was adapted for BBC Television and given a British setting in The Paradise.  It's the story of Octave Mouret, a business genius who transforms a modest draper's shop into a hugely successful department store in 1860s Paris.  Mouret masterfully exploits the desires of his female customers and ruins small competitors along the way, in his relentless pursuit of commercial supremacy.   If it weren't for his employee Denise . . . . . .



Last Edited on: 2/26/14 8:01 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 2/26/2014 2:57 PM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 2,823
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reading Castle Keep by William Eastlake. this is one of those books I always wanted to read because I liked the movie.

Date Posted: 2/27/2014 3:27 PM ET
Member Since: 5/31/2009
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Just finished The Mark of the Beast and Other Stories by Rudyard Kipling, 2/27/2014, 4 stars

Date Posted: 3/6/2014 8:43 PM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
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started Lost Horizon by James Hilton. this book really draws you in quickly. I was hooked on page one. Hilton must have been popular in his day. This book was made into a movie by Frank Capra. Goodbye, Mr Chips was made into a movie and I am pretty sure Random Harvest was made into a movie.

Date Posted: 3/18/2014 11:11 AM ET
Member Since: 9/25/2006
Posts: 314
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Goodbye, Mr Chips was made into a movie in 1939 and in 1969 starring the non-academic party animal Peter O'Toole.

Random Harvest starred Ronald Coleman, probably the most incredible voice in the history of creation. And heaven knows, Greer Garson was pretty easy on the eye.
 



Last Edited on: 3/18/14 11:11 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 3/18/2014 11:29 AM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 2,823
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Ronald Coleman was in Lost Horizon too. The one from 1937 by Frank Capra. also Jane Wyatt.

Date Posted: 3/30/2014 1:19 PM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 2,823
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finished this morning America Bloomsbury by Susan Cheever. Got the book here at pbs from another member. An interesting book. She takes 5 main individuals and their families --- L M Alcott, Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Hawthorne and Thoreau and instead of focusing on each one alone she blends the lives together so you see how they interacted with and influenced one another. If the individuals were not famous the book would just seem like gossip. a short book. only 200 pages.

Date Posted: 3/30/2014 7:39 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Is the author related to John Cheever, the author of short stories, some of which were based on ancient Greek myths?   For example, the basis of one J. Cheever story was the legend of the Greek hunter Actaeon, who accidentally saw Artemis, the chaste goddess of the hunt, in her bath.  The goddess transformed him into a stag and he was then ripped to pieces by his own hounds.

Date Posted: 3/30/2014 8:05 PM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
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yes she is his daughter. I first read her memoir a few years ago about her father. In recent years she has been writing biographies. She may have written a novel also. She has written a biography of e e cummings which I am interested to read but it is too new just now so the price is too high for me.

Date Posted: 3/31/2014 8:31 AM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 2,823
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read last night The Case of the Gilded Lily by Erle Stanley Gardner. Perry Mason does it again.

Date Posted: 4/9/2014 5:23 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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I just finished One of Ours, by Willa Cather, for the "Prize-winners" category of the Challenge.  It always takes me a little bit of hemming and hawing before I begin my next book, because there are just so many wonderful choices!  I'm participating in the World Lit Challenge this year, too, and some of those titles are just great.  Barbara B. and I have been able to share books for the "Sub-Sahara" category.  I hope the World Lit Forum gets more attention and participation as time goes by, for it's a rich trove of very worthwhile reading.

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