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Topic: Anyone have a homeschooled/dual enrolled child?

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Subject: Anyone have a homeschooled/dual enrolled child?
Date Posted: 1/1/2011 4:24 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2006
Posts: 4,865
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I'm just starting home schooling with my high school junior, and she's dual enrolled in college classes.  Wondered if anyone else is doing this and has any words of wisdom to offer.

Date Posted: 1/1/2011 10:03 PM ET
Member Since: 9/14/2007
Posts: 481
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Hello, Lynn.

My 17yodd has been dual enrolled since August 2009. Did you have any specific questions? Our experience have mostly positive. The cost of the textbooks is a concern for us, as only public school dual enrollees get the books for free....but I still think it is a great value as the courses are free! Dd started out with 6 credits last year/semester. This year she is early admission, which means that she is taking 12 credits each semester.

 Read the fine print of everything carefully. Our district requires that the home school office sign off EACH  semester stating that the dual enrolled student is in good standing and eligible for dual enrollment. Without the signature, the student will NOT be allowed to sign up for courses at the CC. Since dual enrolled students register last, after the degree seeking students have registered, this could be a catastrophe as course selections are very limited by that time! An hour or so can mean getting the course your student needs/wants or getting stuck with whatever is left. My dd has had to do a lot of checking and re-checking to be sure the courses she wants are open. Check the deadlines and prerequisites carefully so you don't waste time attempting to register for courses that your student isn't eligible to take.

HTH a bit. Also talk to other families in your area who may be dual enrolled. Sometime they're more help than the adminstration at the CC, but I am not going to go there now!

Patrice

 

 

 

 

 

Date Posted: 1/2/2011 12:29 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2006
Posts: 4,865
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Thanks Patrice!  I'll pm you.

Date Posted: 1/3/2011 8:35 AM ET
Member Since: 4/7/2007
Posts: 335
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Hi Lynn, my son is dual-enrolled at community college as are many of his homeschooled friends. We all chose a community college which makes enrollment simple and is friendly to homeschoolers. We don't need to get any signatures from anyone, and parents can sign the admission and enrollment forms.

As for the coursework, it is more intense than my son has had at home so he focuses mostly on his college courses as his academics during the semester. He has learned somethings but mostly goes for the experience of being in a classroom. I still believe a person can get a better education outside of institutions, leading his own learning. That said, a few institutional courses add a degree of legitimacy for outsiders who may be looking for grades, etc.

Enjoy the experience with your daughter.

 

Date Posted: 1/3/2011 10:24 AM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2006
Posts: 4,865
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Thanks Patrice and Lynne.  My son was dual-enrolled (public school/college), and it worked well for him--and tuition was paid for by the state.  However, my daughter is homeschooled, dual-enrolled, so nothing is paid for.  I feel confident my daughter is ready for college-level work (she had the college testing done and all that), but I find it frustrating that we can't have the same advantage economically as public school students have.  Any thoughts on that issue?

Date Posted: 1/4/2011 9:39 AM ET
Member Since: 4/7/2007
Posts: 335
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Lynn, the only thing I can think of is that your daughter may be eligible for scholarships. Is she attending the college full-time? It might be cost-effective for her to take their minimum full-time credits (usually 12) in order to qualify for scholarship funds. Schools typically offer their own scholarships, and you'll need to file a FAFSA. A legitimate site on the web compiles 3rd party scholarships from various organizations. It's called fastweb.com, and although you'll need to register there is no fee. ADS pay, and many times you'll have to read ads and offers before you get to the scholarships but there is always a "no thanks" button. I've used it for many years and have found some great money opportunities.

Economically, public school students may have the advantage but in most other ways (freedom, time, health, happiness), homeschoolers are way ahead. So it's a fair trade in my opinion.

 

Date Posted: 1/4/2011 9:50 AM ET
Member Since: 3/20/2007
Posts: 931
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You just need to be careful that a high school student doesn't get too many credits at a CC to mess up university scholarships.  If they get to sophomore or junior status upon entering a university, they may miss out on a LOT of scholarships and financial aid.  Of course the trade off is that to get all those credits, they were a lot less expensive (sometimes).

Also, their National Merit status can get all fouled up, too.

We were all set to enroll DS at the local CC this last semester but decided against it for the above reasons.  He's only 12 and needed Trigonometry & Physics, but we decided to continue using the at-home curricula we have and then have him take the SAT II tests (subject tests) for credit. ...and/or CLEP and AP testing.  Those are additional, less expensive ways to gain credits.

Also, if you have your child take the ACT or SAT (whichever the CC prefers and "knows"), that will help with admission and placement at a "non-normal" age.  My DS scored so high that the CC's around here don't need him to take their Math & English entrance/placement tests.

Date Posted: 1/4/2011 2:00 PM ET
Member Since: 4/18/2006
Posts: 4,865
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the only thing I can think of is that your daughter may be eligible for scholarships. Is she attending the college full-time?

My daughter is full time enrolled, so she is eligible for scholarships, and we're spending a TON of time doing them.  The only glitch is that most require a diploma already...so I'm having to contact board members, etc., to explain our unique situation...but so far no problem (just more costly in time and effort).  Hopefully we'll get some money for her.

You just need to be careful that a high school student doesn't get too many credits at a CC to mess up university scholarships.

That's a good point too--but in our case, not the concern.  She's just going to continue on with cc, and then transfer to the four year college here (the cc and the four year university work closely together and lots of people do that because the cc tuition is so much cheaper).