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Topic: April reading

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Subject: April reading
Date Posted: 4/1/2012 12:31 PM ET
Member Since: 11/18/2009
Posts: 551
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Let's start out this new month by sharing which Classics Challenge book(s) we're planning to read. I've just started Wilkie Collins' Armadale, and I'm already

hooked. Collins is mainly known for his brilliant Woman In White and The Moonstone, but  I'm going to seek out his other novels as well.

                                                                                                                                                                                    Rose

 

 

 

Date Posted: 4/1/2012 2:11 PM ET
Member Since: 5/15/2010
Posts: 143
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April reading in classics

For the category bildungsroman I'll be needing to read  L. P. Hartley's. The Go-Between because it's my book group's May selection and we meet early in May. I may also try to whittle away at the short story collection category. I've chosen Daphne Du Maurier's  short story collection Don't Look Now. Reading that one will satisfy this category for the classics challege as well as another category for another challenge I'm in. (always good to read strategically for the challenges!)

 

Janet

Date Posted: 4/3/2012 12:47 PM ET
Member Since: 5/4/2009
Posts: 87
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I read Tolstoy's trilogy of autobiographical novels Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth for the bildungsroman category (just finished the last one yesterday!).

I've been working on Plato's Republic ("book that changed the world" category). Hopefully, I'll finish it tomorrow. So far, I'm finding it dull, which is making it very difficult to work through.

Following that, I am eager to read Les Miserables (for the "book I consider long" category). I can't wait to start it! laugh

Date Posted: 4/4/2012 5:02 PM ET
Member Since: 5/31/2009
Posts: 2,865
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I've just finished So Big by Edna Ferber, a read I had started several times but just finished.  It's wonderful.  Why did I not discover this author before now?  As one reads the tale, one might think that this is the story of Selina Peake but it's titled after her son, Dirk, whom she called SoBig.  What a delight!  I invite anyone who has not discovered this author to pick up So Big or another of her several novels although So Big won the author a Pulitzer prize.  Not certain what my next read will be - perhaps a Mark Twain - stories or a children's tale, The Prince and the Pauper.



Last Edited on: 4/13/12 4:15 PM ET - Total times edited: 3
Date Posted: 4/10/2012 4:29 PM ET
Member Since: 6/19/2007
Posts: 5,930
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I just finished my literary award recipient: The World According to Garp by John Irving (National Book Award Winner).  It was alright, I don't understand why so many people seem to have lost their minds over it.  One of my English professors said it's his favorite book ever.  I'm a big fan of motley crew casts of characters who're weirdos and misfits.  I love love love Confederacy of Dunces which was my first classics challenge of the year.  But I don't think WATG will stay with me for more than a few days nor be one I'm inclined to revisit. 

Since I've already finished challenges #1 (book that changed the world- Origin of Species), 3 (wit lit- Confederacy of Dunces), 7 (dystopia- A Clockwork Orange), 9 (short book- Cat's Cradle) and 12 (modern library top 100- Tender is the Night) as well as TWATG I'm taking the rest of April off to enjoy some more modern books that have been creeping up my TBR.

 

 

 

Date Posted: 4/10/2012 11:01 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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For the Challenge, I've been reading some Balzac for the "Wit Lit" category.  But ol' Honore got sidetracked a bit after I found a vintage copy of George Bernard Shaw's The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Socialism and Capitalism in the "free for the taking" reading materials in the back entrance of the public library. 

Plus,  I received a PBS book in the mail, The Elegance of the Hedgehog, by Muriel Barbery, a philosophy professor in France, a beautiful story even though a rather sad one.   Barbery made masterful use of interior monologues of her two main narrative voices, a fiftyish woman concierge of an apartment house at 7 Rue de Grenelle, Paris, and a twelve-and-a-half year old girl, daughter of one of the tenants.   The reader also becomes acquainted with the other tenants in the apartment building, especially the "new" one, the gracious  Monsieur Ozu.  Read it if you like thoughtful books . . . .  

I have changed my initial selection for the Biography/Autobiography/Memoir category.  I am now well into Thorstein Veblen, by Douglas F. Dowd.  Of Veblen's eleven books, I had read only The Theory of the Leisure Class, and felt I would like to know something more about this great American thinker (especially in these days of "the 99% vs. the 1%" coming to a head.



Last Edited on: 4/30/12 6:18 PM ET - Total times edited: 4
Date Posted: 4/28/2012 11:12 AM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2009
Posts: 25,000
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I am enjoying Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles. Yeah, Bradbury is corny pulp. I don't care. 

Date Posted: 4/29/2012 5:39 PM ET
Member Since: 6/19/2007
Posts: 5,930
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Yeah, Bradbury is corny pulp.

>Gasp!<  How can you say that?!  Fahrenheit 451?  Something Wicked This Way Comes?  The man is a national treasure, albeit a slightly paranoid, technophobic one.  I like to imagine that  he and Isaac Asimov used to meet to discuss detailed plans for what to do when the machines take over.

Date Posted: 4/30/2012 6:26 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Nice to know a "national treasure" CAN BE "paranoid" and "technophobic" . . . . when the natural leader of the Machines emerges, and the Humans become their acolytes, I hope there will be 'reservations' sent aside for those hopeless folks who just can't adapt to the electronic, computerized, impersonal, high-speed society.

Years ago, I read a book by Norbert Weiner that was eerily predictive.  It was entitled "The Human Use of Human Beings."   He wrote of how the humans were (even then) becoming more and more mechanical, while the machines were becoming more and more 'human.'   It still strikes me as odd that my microwave flashes me a message of "Enjoy!" when it has finished popping my corn, and the toll booth flashes me a bright "Thank you" after I have paid my tithe . . . .

Before long, will we be hearing some human say "Why, one of my best friends is a robot" ?



Last Edited on: 4/30/12 6:28 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 5/1/2012 5:26 PM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2009
Posts: 25,000
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>Gasp!<  How can you say that?!  Fahrenheit 451?  Something Wicked This Way Comes?  The man is a national treasure, albeit a slightly paranoid, technophobic one.

 

He is a treasure. I enjoy the corny-ness immensely. I like it that on Mars we still have old fashioned telephones and the Martians have telephathy yet the Martians are being wiped out as if they were Native Americans. Did they not see it coming?



Last Edited on: 5/1/12 5:28 PM ET - Total times edited: 1