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Topic: Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand

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Subject: Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand
Date Posted: 6/30/2011 12:54 PM ET
Member Since: 10/11/2007
Posts: 8
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Has anyone read this book through and what do you make of it.  I'm about half way through and it almost seems like a carricature of what we are doing now.

 

Richard

Date Posted: 7/2/2011 12:15 AM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2009
Posts: 25,000
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Richard, I've never read it, just the very short Anthem.

Funny, someone just did a couple of drive by postings last week and swore up and down how much he hated Ms. Rand's work. 

Date Posted: 7/2/2011 11:17 AM ET
Member Since: 11/18/2009
Posts: 551
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I totally agree that Atlas Shrugged reflects today's world.

I read it about 30 years ago; it greatly impressed me then. It's a brilliant book!

                                                                                     Rose

Date Posted: 7/2/2011 10:40 PM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2009
Posts: 25,000
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Skip.

Double post.



Last Edited on: 7/2/11 10:42 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 7/2/2011 10:41 PM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2009
Posts: 25,000
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Atlas Shrugged reflects today's world.

 

Time to get a copy, but I fear the girth!

 

Opps, no. Can't. No copies available at PBS.no

Date Posted: 7/5/2011 8:57 AM ET
Member Since: 10/11/2007
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I haven't finished reading     it yet but I will post it as soon as I do. Put it on your wish list. This book really  is different and long.

richard

Date Posted: 7/5/2011 8:09 PM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2009
Posts: 25,000
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I will, but  what ISBN is on your copy? 

Date Posted: 7/5/2011 9:48 PM ET
Member Since: 4/9/2008
Posts: 550
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Really an amazing book in its reflection (prediction?) of today. Honestly, I read a full two thirds and started scanning out of sheer exhaustion the rest of the way. It could have used some skillful editing. But there were so many truths in there, I'd be afraid to lose some of those.

Date Posted: 7/9/2011 2:23 PM ET
Member Since: 4/25/2007
Posts: 54
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Q

Date Posted: 7/9/2011 2:23 PM ET
Member Since: 4/25/2007
Posts: 54
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Q

Date Posted: 7/9/2011 2:23 PM ET
Member Since: 4/25/2007
Posts: 54
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Last Edited on: 7/9/11 2:24 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Subject: isbn number
Date Posted: 7/14/2011 2:42 PM ET
Member Since: 10/11/2007
Posts: 8
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My copy number is listed onmy bookshelf

 

richard

Date Posted: 7/18/2011 4:25 PM ET
Member Since: 12/27/2007
Posts: 702
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I read Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead years ago.  I was so young that I basically enjoyed the stories.  I re-read one of them last year (forgot which one).  I still enjoyed it but not as much as in my younger days (20's, I think).

Subject: yawn
Date Posted: 8/16/2011 9:55 AM ET
Member Since: 4/15/2010
Posts: 76
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Rand is a talented author with good ideas, but I am a big fan of concise, saying more with less, and getting to the point.  This book is a most excellent rambling of great ideas that will exhaust your focus.  I listened to the first 1/3 of this book on a 12 hour road trip (only the first 1/3 in 12 hours!) and found myself in repeated board room meetings.  Not thrilling.  I guess I would say this book falls under the "King is not wearing clothes".  Many are hesitant to admit Atlas Shrugged is long, tedious, and often boring just because the "elite" say it is a classic. 

Date Posted: 8/21/2011 5:30 PM ET
Member Since: 11/7/2010
Posts: 57
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I hate it. But then everything I've read by Ayn Rand falls into that category.

"Atlas Shrugged"  is long, tedious ,a classic  bore...

Date Posted: 8/22/2011 12:29 PM ET
Member Since: 6/19/2007
Posts: 5,930
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I liked Anthem & Atlas Shrugged even though Rand was a nutter.  The Fountainhead just got too weird for me with the bizarre relationships between the characters.

Subject: Atlas Shrugged
Date Posted: 9/5/2011 9:16 AM ET
Member Since: 10/11/2007
Posts: 8
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Hi All:

 

I am almost finished with the book and am glad to see that most of the comments agree with my thinking. One of the most tedious passages is when Ann Rynd takes 100 pages to have John Galt explain his philosophy'

However I am glad to have read it. Its is a look at gov't gone wild.

 

Would have liked to have a Readers Digest Condensed books of it.

 

Richard

Date Posted: 9/5/2011 6:33 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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I won't try to assess Atlas Shrugged, but I will say that the character, architect Howard Roark, in The Fountainhead, merits thinking about.  Also, it's worthwhile, IMO, to reflect on the way others in Roark's profession reacted to his work (a bunch of 'derivative' architects to an original, innovative one).  Also interesting was the way the critic had such a high opinion of himself as an arbiter entitled  to judge and render a 'verdict' on something new in the realm of "Art."  It makes the reader think of the old sayings:  "Everybody is a critic." and "Those who can, DO; those who can't, CRITICIZE."



Last Edited on: 9/5/11 6:35 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Subject: Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand
Date Posted: 9/11/2011 4:39 PM ET
Member Since: 10/11/2007
Posts: 8
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Thanks everybody for all your comments. I have just finished reading Atlas Shrugged and feel I have finished  a marathon,but overall I have no regrets. It was very different from my favorite genres,spy novels or biograaphys of the people involved in our country's birth. It is long and hard but a reflection of where we will be as a country  if we don;t watch out.

 

Thanks again,

Richard

Date Posted: 9/28/2011 5:39 AM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2010
Posts: 1,540
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I don't know how you can read Ann Rand and see any reflection of reality at all. She's a raving lunatic.

I wonder what she thought about FAMILY.  ( Or is it *every man for himself* there as well?)

Scalzi did a review a while back:  "In Ayn Rand's world, a man who self-righteously instigates the collapse of society, thereby inevitably killing millions if not billions of people, is portrayed as a messiah figure rather than as a genocidal pr**ck, which is what he'd be anywhere else."

Slam-dunk. 

The funny thing is that the people who self-identify as Randian heroes tend to actually be more along the lines of the same people Rand called the looters:

"I know from talking to a lot of Fortune 500 C.E.O.'s that Atlas Shrugged has had a significant effect on their business decisions, even if they don't agree with all of Ayn Rand's ideas."
— John A. Allison, former CEO of BB&T

Yeah Mr. Allison, you added nada to the economy.  You and your ilk, oh, what did Ann call you?  The individualists.......are the true parasites.  A million welfare recipients don't consume a fraction of what you people do with your stock options and outsized bonuses.

But alas, according to Ayn Rand, Altruism is an evil sentiment that only results in atrocities (you know, like child labor laws and homeless people being fed).

 

Rolls eyes.  Maybe I was reading a different book than the ones who like her *theories*  LOL

Oh, wait.  It's because I'm not intelligent enough, that's it, if I were, I would surely APPRECIATE her theories.  LOL

 

 



Last Edited on: 9/28/11 5:45 AM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 9/29/2011 1:49 PM ET
Member Since: 6/19/2007
Posts: 5,930
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Like I said, she was a nutter, but she had her moments.  And sometimes being totally selfish sounds super appealing.

drinkthe-koolaid:  mimisaurus:  wildtigahh:  cracked:  Evening Reading  accurate  BAHAHAHHAHAA. I sporfled.  Perfect.  I laughed, but I still really like The Fountainhead.