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Topic: Back on the quest for knowledge

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Subject: Back on the quest for knowledge
Date Posted: 12/26/2007 7:05 AM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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Well Im always on a quest for knowledge but its religious and spiritual knowledge Im looking for now. Please dont answer this question with the bible. Not because I dont wanna hear it but Ive read it and I continue to read it. I wanna know what religious text you read. Buddhist, Hindu, whatever flavor you come in where do you get your religious and spiritual knowledge?

Date Posted: 12/26/2007 10:32 AM ET
Member Since: 1/10/2006
Posts: 1,069
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There are a lot of great  nonfiction books that deal with religion and spiritual knowledge and many are right here on PBS. I especially like the ones that deal with how to incorporate the knowledge into  living everyday life. And while you do read the Bible, I would suggest reading different translations. Sometimes that helps me.

Date Posted: 12/26/2007 4:56 PM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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Diane this is my Bible: http://bibleresources.bible.com/keywordsearchresults.php?keyword=serpants&multiplemethod=all&version1=48&numpageresults=25&sortorder=bookorder

It has several translations including the oldest English version.

Date Posted: 12/27/2007 12:22 PM ET
Member Since: 1/10/2006
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Thanks for the link, Chris.  I also enjoy Joyce Meyer's " THE EVERYDAY LIFE BIBLE"  (Amplified version) that includes her notes and commentary). They are , of course, from the Christian perspective.

Date Posted: 12/27/2007 9:50 PM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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Your welcome. I love that site cause not only are there several translations I can search one word and get every verse with that word in it. It saves sooooo much time and I dont miss things when Im looking them up.

Date Posted: 12/28/2007 10:05 PM ET
Member Since: 3/31/2006
Posts: 28,502
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Chris, are you trying to make my brain hurt tonight?  LOL

I really don't read any religious text.  I've mentioned before that they really don't speak to me.  I take a more direct approach by reading books written by individuals.  I've read some of the works of Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., Sylvia Boorstein, Joseph Campbell, Ram Dass, Dan Millman, Carlos Castenada, Mother Theresa, and many others I can't think of.  I probably learned more about the important religious texts from Bill Moyer's interviews with Joseph Campbell than anywhere else.  I consider Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha one of the best spiritual books I've read though it's a work of fiction.  Also, Under the Underpass by Mike Yankowski--something I read this year that really had me thinking about spirituality and how we treat the lesser of us.

I am also an avid watcher of documentary and always looking for those that expand my knowledge and understanding...or baffle me even further.

Date Posted: 12/29/2007 1:05 AM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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I promise the only brain I pictured hurting was mine. Im still ruminating on the whole issue with my cousin and its making me not question but want to expand my knowledge. I dont gain a belief from most religious texts. I gain a closer understanding of others from religious texts. I dont believe in religion but I do like to know more about religions.

Date Posted: 12/29/2007 2:48 PM ET
Member Since: 4/20/2006
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I'm with you Chris....religous texts don't interest me as much as the history of religion.  Really interesting stuff.  One of the best classes I ever took in college was a Western Civilization class.  I learned a lot about religious history in it.

Date Posted: 12/29/2007 6:14 PM ET
Member Since: 10/7/2007
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I have found most of the books through A.R.E., the Association for Research and Enlightenment, to be helpful. Naturally many of the books are based on Edgar Cayce's readings, but not all. I found YOUR LIFE: WHY IT IS THE WAY IT IS AND WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT: Understanding the Universal Laws, by Bruce McArthur to sum  up what I need to know.

I have taken a comparative religion class and one on western religions, both very interesting. I think I posted one of the text books, 8 Ways to the Center. I've also taken both old and new testament classes at college.

I took one of those quizes to find out what religion most closely matched what I believe and it said Unitarian Universalist most closely matched, with Paganism coming in second. Whatever that means.

Date Posted: 12/29/2007 7:06 PM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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From what I understand of it UU is kinda everything and none of them all at once. Did that make sense? I dont make a lot of sense lately too much going on in my head and no where to let it out at.

Date Posted: 12/29/2007 7:50 PM ET
Member Since: 11/28/2006
Posts: 2,087
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You are right Amanda - you can learn a lot about religions from a Western Civ class.  I used to teach Western Civilization - the first half, from ancient times to 1500.  In fact, it was my college major that finally got me to admit to being an unbeliever.  I'm a medievalist/ancient historian and by the time I got through all my graduate level classes I knew that I might just as well admit it.  I still enjoy studying religions, even though I don't follow one.

 

 

Date Posted: 12/29/2007 10:43 PM ET
Member Since: 3/31/2006
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Amanda, I think that is why I enjoyed the interviews with Joseph Campbell (with Bill Moyers)  When you see that so many of religions draw from the same ideas, it's really difficult to say that one should be held in better esteem than another.  There really are more similarities when you remove the multiple Gods or one and only God stuff from the equation. 

I think what I find so profound as an adults is this.  When I was in school history was taught in a certain way.  The people of Mesopotamia came up, then the Egyptians, the Jews, then the Romans, and the Greeks, then up throw Europe.  Great religions were founded, civilizations evolved, inventions were made.

But, seemingly, nothing else was going on in the rest of the world.  At least from a textbook point of view on history.  As an adult, it is fascinating to me to think that while that is our perspective, someone who grew up in Zimbabwe or India or Japan has a completely different perspective.  They learn about the religions of their own areas and the history of their own regions.  There were things going on all over.  It's just that our focus was very narrow.  We just decided to ignore what didn't serve our need.

 

L. G. (L)
Date Posted: 12/31/2007 5:05 AM ET
Member Since: 9/5/2005
Posts: 12,412
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I don't have a religious text, per se, but find truth in many books.  I don't believe any one book or person is more divine than another.  That being said, Tao Te Ching  contains a lot of wisdom.  The translation I like the best is by Jane English and Gia Fu Feng (sp?).

I find peace and holiness in things of natural origin.  I can get more insight and serenity by sitting in the forest for an hour than any religious text could ever impart.

 

 

Date Posted: 12/31/2007 7:39 AM ET
Member Since: 8/9/2005
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I guess I didnt make it clear I dont want the books to gain a belief I want them to understand other religions.

Date Posted: 12/31/2007 12:11 PM ET
Member Since: 1/9/2006
Posts: 6,638
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Joseph Campbell was amazing!  And Bill Moyer's interviews were also fantastic.  I think all of both of their work is available on video and audio tapes and, of course, both are published as well. 

I think Melody had a great suggestion for a beginning survey of the range and substance of human and cultural beliefs. 

Date Posted: 12/31/2007 12:41 PM ET
Member Since: 7/29/2006
Posts: 1,366
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I've learned a great deal from a wonderful book called THE ART OF PRAYER.  It was originally written in Russian in 1936 and was translated into English by Elizabeth M. Palmer in 1966. (London)  It is a collection of texts on prayer drawn from Greek and Russian sources on  ancient Christian Orthodoxy.   The book deals with the general question "what is prayer?", the different degrees of prayer....from ordinary oral prayer to unceasing prayer of the heart.  Also covers the dangers of illusion and discouragement, as well as the need for seclusion and inner peace.  Though it is written from an Orthodox perspective, this work would also be appreciated by all concerned with the meaning and practice of prayer, regardless of the faith.

The practice of prayer is in all religions.



Last Edited on: 12/31/07 2:42 PM ET - Total times edited: 1