Book Reviews of The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1)

The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1)
The Borrowers - Borrowers, Bk 1
Author: Mary Norton, Beth Krush (Illustrator), Joe Krush (Illustrator)
ISBN-13: 9780152047375
ISBN-10: 0152047379
Publication Date: 4/1/2003
Pages: 192
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 4.4/5 Stars.
 41

4.4 stars, based on 41 ratings
Publisher: Odyssey Classics
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

29 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 23 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This is a very entertaining book I read as a child and just re-read. It has a great ending leaving the reader wondering whether "The Borrowers" are real or imaginary, and allows the reader to imagine the characters' future however you want. A great book for a child or adult.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 5454 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Written in 1952, nostalgic look back at the turn of the (19th-20th) century English gentlefolk. I can imagine that kids who grew up reading this would watch all episodes of "Upstairs, Downstairs". First of 5 books, this is the important one to read, though. What I remember from the story is that the grandfather knew how to count to 57, and I was fascinated why he would stop there. Anyway, heroine is 13 years old.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 12 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Classic children's book! I loved these stories when I was a kid. It's about a family of tiny people that live in the walls and floorboards of a normal family's house. Follow them on their adventures navigating the big world!
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 31 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Adventures of a family of little people. Wonderful book, 1st in a series.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on
Helpful Score: 1
ISBN 0590341502 - I'm going to start by qualifying my 5 stars. There are some things in this book that, while they didn't cause any uproar in 1952, will bother some parents today. I think the book is very worth reading, but if any of the following freaks you out, perhaps you'll disagree with me. The very premise of the Borrowers, that they survive by taking from the human beans of the house, might be seen as stealing, rather than borrowing. This is even brought up in the book; it's possible to see the ending of the story as evidence that "borrowing" isn't the best way to live, anyway. Several human beans get drunk on a routine basis - the word "drunk" is never used, but it is what they do, and it's used as an explanation for certain sightings of Borrowers. If those are things you simply can't get past, don't read this book. If you're able, however, to look past those things, read on!

The Borrowers, a race of small people, live in the floorboards and walls of old, quiet country houses. While Kate and Mrs May work on a quilt, Mrs May tells the story, as told to her by her brother, of the Borrowers who'd once lived in the house of Great-Aunt Sophy. Pod and Homily and their teenage daughter Arrietty are the last of their kind in this house, all the others having emigrated after one of them was seen by a human bean. Sent there to recover from rheumatic fever, Mrs Mays brother befriends Arrietty. Her parents consider this a danger but when he gives them gifts from the dollhouse, they accept him and the new life of ease that he brings. No longer will Pod need to venture out to support his family! Unfortunately, the boy's borrowing has come to the attention of Mrs Driver and the secret of the Borrowers is revealed. The fears of Arrietty's parents are all about to come true!

There's so much to this book! It's a fun fantasy title that offers an entertaining explanation for all those things that go missing in every house. If that was all there was to this, I'd say it was a nice book for kids, but there's actually some good messages (mixed in with the drinking, lol). You might expect the Borrowers to be afraid of humans, but it turns out that the humans are also afraid of the Borrowers. This fear and intolerance is a good opening for discussion. Borrowers fear, but need, humans; humans don't need Borrowers and set out get rid of them. The Borrowers are chased out of their home and will, in many ways, cease to be borrowers and become more independent. The glimpse of their life after they leave the house sounds pleasant, possibly better than before. Will independence make them happier than a life of ease?

Author Mary Norton creates a realistic, tiny world and a surprisingly exciting tale. The Borrowers live on in ISBN 0152047328 The Borrowers Afield, ISBN 0152047336 The Borrowers Afloat, ISBN 0152047344 The Borrowers Aloft, ISBN 015204731X The Borrowers Avenged and ISBN 0152632212 Poor Stainless: A Story About the Borrowers. The illustrations, by Beth and Joe Krush, are interesting. For the most part, they're not attractive drawings. The Borrowers and the boy are drawn well, while the other humans resemble apes more than humans. This must be intentional, but I just don't find these images a pleasant addition to the book. Still, they somewhat satisfy the curiosity to see how the Borrowers live and how they use the items they borrow and to highlight the smallness of them against the size of the human world. For younger readers, 8 and up, this is probably best read to them (the British tone may be off-putting for them alone). Readers 11 and up will be fine on their own with this one - and adults will enjoy it too!

- AnnaLovesBooks
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 203 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Classic book (with lovely line drawings) for 8-12 yr olds. The book IS better than the movie -- at least have your kids read the book first!
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 11 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Who are the Borrowers? There aren't many of the minature people left, for the rush of modern life doesn't suit them. They like to live in quiet, out-of-the-way country houses where things move in an orderly, well-established pattern. In just such a house lives the Clock family, Pod, Homily, and their daughter, Arrietty. They quietly and secretly make thier living borrowing from the "human beans" until the day a human boy comes to live in the house. In her youthful curiousity, Arrietty commits the worst Borrower mistake: she is "seen" by a "human bean"--and disaster follows. Aid comes from a most surprising source, and the Clock family escapes to find a new life and further adventure.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 10 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
So fun to read. Finished it in one day :)
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on
I bought the book because Joe Krush was one of my teachers in art school (many years ago) My granddaughter read the book and loved it!
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 19 more book reviews
Even better than the movie... this is a story about those miniature, shy people who quietly "borrow" things from human "beans" they live with. (In our family we call them the "wall elves"... maybe you have some living with you, too?)
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on
Used as a read-aloud for my 6 year old, who enjoyed it and was able to follow the story easily. Over the heads of my 4 and 2 year old. Nice to read it again as an adult - I read it as a 9 year old and thoroughly enjoyed it
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on
"Who are the Borrowers? There aren't many of the miniature people left, for the rush of modern life doesn't suit them. They like to live in quiet, out-of-the-way country houses where things move in an orderly, well-established pattern. In just such a housse lives the Clock family, Pod, Homily, and their daughter, Arrietty. They quietly and secretly make their living borrowing from the "human beans," until the day a human boy comes to live in the house. In her youthful curiosity, Arrietty commits the worst Borrower mistake: she is seem by a "human bean" - and disaster follows. Aid comes from a most surprising source, and the Clock family escapes to find a new life and further adventure."
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 3 more book reviews
Very cute, a book every kid could love.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on
One of my favorites as a child. I can now share this with my own child!
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 14 more book reviews
Charming, the Borrowers - explains fancifully what happens to all those little things that "disappear" at home.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 77 more book reviews
This is one of my all-time favorite children's lit books; better than those that follow in the series. It's easy for a child to imagine living like The Borrowers do, and it stimulates the imagination to think of all of the uses to which large versions of every day items could be used. The characters are believable and easy to like.

Claudia
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 12 more book reviews
From back cover:

Underneath the kitchen floor is the world of the Borrowers-Pod and Homily Clock and their daughter, Arrietty. In their tiny home, matchboxes double as roomy dressers and postage stamps hang on the walls like paintings. Whatever the Clocks need they simply "borrow" from the "human beans" who live above them. It's a comfortable life.

Comfortable-but boring if you're a kid.

Only Pod is allowed to venture into the house above, because the danger of being seen by a human is too great. Borrowers who are seen by humans are never seen again.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 20 more book reviews
A great children's book!
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 39 more book reviews
I read this a LONG time ago, but remember really loving it as a kid.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 3 more book reviews
Son says this book is good.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 92 more book reviews
An American Library Association Distinguished book. The first of the series
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on
Book came in perfect condition and ended up being a great gift for a niece!
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 31 more book reviews
Fanastic read for young and old.
Would not be selling but have hardcopy so will part with paperback version.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 26 more book reviews
Where do things disappear to? The Borrowers may have taken the missing pins and match boxes. This is one of my favorite books, both of adult's and children's literature. A classic.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 3352 more book reviews
What can I say - I love the Borrowers and look for them in my own home - and I'm of retirement age. Read this book and you'll love them too.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on
Love this book! great read with my 7 yr old!
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on
Underneath the kitchen floor is the world of the Borrowers. Pod and Homily clock and thier daughter, Arrietty. In their tiny jome, mathcboxes double as roomy dressers and postage stamps hang on the walls like paintings. whatever the Clocks need they simply "borrow" from the "human beans" who live above them. Its a comfortable life.

Comfortable - but boring if your a kid
Only Pod is allowed to venture into the house above, because the danger of being seen by a human is too great. Borrowers who are seen by humans are never again seen. Yet Arrietty is desperate for a friend....
But then Arrietty is seen. suddenly it seems everyone in the house hold is after the Borrowers. Except the one person who can help them. And so the desperate Clocks must trust their fates to that most dreaded of creatures....a human bean.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 5454 more book reviews
First written in 1952, first (and best) in the series.
reviewed The Borrowers (Borrowers, Bk 1) on + 23 more book reviews
"A rare and delicious addition to children's literature...deserves to take its place on the shelf of undying classics" Louisville Courier-Journal