Book Reviews of Bring Me a Unicorn

Bring Me a Unicorn
Bring Me a Unicorn
ISBN-13: 9780451084477
ISBN-10: 0451084470
Publication Date: 4/1/1973
Rating:
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
 3

5 stars, based on 3 ratings
Publisher: Harcourt
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

5 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Bring Me a Unicorn on + 386 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I got this book because I had already read a biography of Lindbergh, and wanted to know what his wife thought of him. I was pleasantly surprised to find that Anne is an interesting person herself, writes well, and provided a very entertaining book. I even read several portions along the way to my husband, who usually doesn't care for literature. Anne becomes obsessed with Linbergh after their first meeting, and can't get him out of her head for the next six months. I loved how he continued to crop up in her thoughts, and how madly she kept protesting that she could never care for this man.

I was frustrated at the end. After waiting the whole book to find out how they finally connected, we're left with a simple letter to a friend saying, "Guess what, I'm engaged, isn't it a stitch?" That's it, that's the end. You need to get the next book to understand the complete lack of explanation of what should have been a very crucial moment in her life. The media had been making life miserable for both of them. When they got engaged, Charles told Anne not to say anything she didn't want shouted from the rooftops, or write anything she didn't want published in the newspaper. So she stopped writing in her diary for a long period, and only wrote superficial things, or things in code, in letters. We never get to read about the proposal because there is no written record of it.

I recommend a general knowledge of Charles Lindbergh at least, or better yet reading his biography, before reading Anne's diaries. It will help understand events Anne does not explain because they were, to her, common knowledge, and also give a look at his character, which Anne describes so well but from a girlish point of view.
reviewed Bring Me a Unicorn on + 262 more book reviews
16 pgs of photos, Diaries and letters of Anne Morrow Lindbergh 1922-28. Anne Morrow Lindbergh married Charles Lindbergh. This is the period before she marries him up until marriage 1928.
reviewed Bring Me a Unicorn on + 50 more book reviews
This is a wonderful memoir written by a young woman who would have a place in at least one of the biggest news stories of the early part of the century. Her first born child is kidnapped and murdered...her husband the infamous Charles Lindbergh who after being catapulted into near-godlike status, falls after he sympathizes with the Nazis. And, of course, falls again after new revelations in 2003 (no spoilers here;-)).

Anne Morrow was a beautiful writer, Gift From the Sea, a later book, is one of my all-time favorites and was another huge bestseller. Still a lovely, prescient read for wives and mothers.

I also highly recommend her daughters' books: Reeve Lindbergh. She wrote a lovely memoir of her mother as she became disabled with dementia. Reeve also lost her first born child to SIDS.
reviewed Bring Me a Unicorn on + 386 more book reviews
I got this book because I had already read a biography of Lindbergh, and wanted to know what his wife thought of him. I was pleasantly surprised to find that Anne is an interesting person herself, writes well, and provided a very entertaining book. I even read several portions along the way to my husband, who usually doesn't care for literature. Anne becomes obsessed with Linbergh after their first meeting, and can't get him out of her head for the next six months. I loved how he continued to crop up in her thoughts, and how madly she kept protesting that she could never care for this man.

I was frustrated at the end. After waiting the whole book to find out how they finally connected, we're left with a simple letter to a friend saying, "Guess what, I'm engaged, isn't it a stitch?" That's it, that's the end. You need to get the next book to understand the complete lack of explanation of what should have been a very crucial moment in her life. The media had been making life miserable for both of them. When they got engaged, Charles told Anne not to say anything she didn't want shouted from the rooftops, or write anything she didn't want published in the newspaper. So she stopped writing in her diary for a long period, and only wrote superficial things, or things in code, in letters. We never get to read about the proposal because there is no written record of it.

I recommend a general knowledge of Charles Lindbergh at least, or better yet reading his biography, before reading Anne's diaries. It will help understand events Anne does not explain because they were, to her, common knowledge, and also give a look at his character, which Anne describes so well but from a girlish point of view.
reviewed Bring Me a Unicorn on + 386 more book reviews
I got this book because I had already read a biography of Lindbergh, and wanted to know what his wife thought of him. I was pleasantly surprised to find that Anne is an interesting person herself, writes well, and provided a very entertaining book. I even read several portions along the way to my husband, who usually doesn't care for literature. Anne becomes obsessed with Linbergh after their first meeting, and can't get him out of her head for the next six months. I loved how he continued to crop up in her thoughts, and how madly she kept protesting that she could never care for this man.

I was frustrated at the end. After waiting the whole book to find out how they finally connected, we're left with a simple letter to a friend saying, "Guess what, I'm engaged, isn't it a stitch?" That's it, that's the end. You need to get the next book to understand the complete lack of explanation of what should have been a very crucial moment in her life. The media had been making life miserable for both of them. When they got engaged, Charles told Anne not to say anything she didn't want shouted from the rooftops, or write anything she didn't want published in the newspaper. So she stopped writing in her diary for a long period, and only wrote superficial things, or things in code, in letters. We never get to read about the proposal because there is no written record of it.

I recommend a general knowledge of Charles Lindbergh at least, or better yet reading his biography, before reading Anne's diaries. It will help understand events Anne does not explain because they were, to her, common knowledge, and also give a look at his character, which Anne describes so well but from a girlish point of view.