Book Reviews of Burr : A Novel (Vintage International)

Burr : A Novel (Vintage International)
Burr A Novel - Vintage International
Author: Gore Vidal
ISBN-13: 9780375708732
ISBN-10: 0375708731
Publication Date: 2/15/2000
Pages: 448
Rating:
  • Currently 3.7/5 Stars.
 17

3.7 stars, based on 17 ratings
Publisher: Vintage
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

4 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Burr : A Novel (Vintage International) on + 384 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This is my favorite Gore Vidal book. he takes Burr's life and makes it and the times come alive.
reviewed Burr : A Novel (Vintage International) on + 25 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
"Here we have Burr's story-A tragedy, a comedy, a vibrant, legkicking life...All of this and much, much more is told in a highly engaging book that teems with bon mots, aphoriisms and ironic comments on the political process... Enlilghtening, fresh and fun" Margret Manning, Boston Globe
reviewed Burr : A Novel (Vintage International) on + 384 more book reviews
this is a wonderful historical fiction book about one of the most misunderstood founding fathers.
reviewed Burr : A Novel (Vintage International) on + 625 more book reviews
Charles Schuyler is a personal assistant to Aaron Burr, the former Revolutionary War hero, vice president under Jefferson, and infamous slayer of Alexander Hamilton. He's also been employed by a group of political operatives in New York journalism circles to dig up evidence that Burr is the "natural father," as the expression goes, of up-and-coming presidential candidate Martin van Buren. Schuyler's journal entries are a wondrous prose picture of Jacksonian society, while an imagined autobiographical account from Burr provides a similar depiction of the nation's origins. Like all of Vidal's historical fiction, Burr has little use for America's received iconography, and draws upon contemporary sources to puncture the legendary reputations of Washington and Jefferson. There are also marvelous cameo appearances from figures like Washington Irving and Davy Crockett, of whom Schuyler notes, "He is considered a delightful figure. I can't think why." (There's also a substantial subplot in which Schuyler falls in love with a prostitute named Helen Jewett;