Book Reviews of Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise

Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise
Chicks With Sticks 3 Knitwise
Author: Elizabeth Lenhard
ISBN-13: 9780525478386
ISBN-10: 0525478388
Publication Date: 10/4/2007
Pages: 272
Reading Level: All Ages
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 7

4.1 stars, based on 7 ratings
Publisher: Dutton Juvenile
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

15 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 423 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
Very good story for teenage girls. The relationships felt real and the story was fun, emotional, complex, colorful and loaded with yarn. I'm not a teen anymore, but I really enjoyed this book.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 165 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
Cute book about teenagers learning to knit and loving it! I enjoyed the story. The author had a wealth of knitting knowledge in this book!
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 207 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
I didn't realize that this book was classified as "Young Adult", but like many books intended for young people ("The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants" series and "The Book Thief" come to mind), I found the themes of friendship and pushing out of one's comfort zone to learn something new to be one I could easily relate to. The two days I spent reading this were an interesting and enjoyable experience. Recommended for "chicks" of all ages!
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 14 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
I was expecting this to be a knitting book; it's a novel aimed at young adults featuring knitting at the center of the story.

Not bad, just not what I expected. :->
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 423 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
I loved this sequel. It is so great to read about these friends who seem so real to life. They are confident, insecure, bold, shy, calm, dramatic. They have all the characteristics of real teenage girls. They're great!!! The patterns at the end are cute, too. Can't wait for the 3rd book.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 391 more book reviews
Very touching coming of age story :)
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 2 more book reviews
I love this book and i would recommend reading it.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on
This series deals pretty even-handedly with teenage issues and shows adults in realistic fashion.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 423 more book reviews
As usual...these girls are real and strong. You instantly care about these girls. I love their story and how knitting brings them together. Very nice easy read, for all ages.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on
It's another sweet book in the series. It's nice to end it for them, but it wasn't my favorite story from the series. I liked it as the end of the series, but I probably wouldn't have as book by itself.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 24 more book reviews
This is a cute book, written well for teenagers. As another reviewer said, the relationships are real and the events are relatable.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Cana Rensberger for TeensReadToo.com

Fifteen-year-old Scottie has trains roaring through her dreams at night, resulting in hours of early morning insomnia. It's been like this since Aunt Roz's funeral. To make it worse, she's begun to feel like a stranger in her own home-turned-art gallery. Her mother spends days in a trance creating bizarre paintings that have become the new "must-have" art, and her dad spends hours on the phone schmoozing potential buyers and scheduling the next art party.

Scottie's parents don't seem to remember she exists and Scottie fears that she's becoming invisible to her best friend, Amanda, as well. Amanda has left her for the popular clique as she developed curves that Scottie is, so far, lacking. Scottie's life is falling apart. Only a ball of yarn and a couple of needles keep her from becoming completely frayed.

Early one morning, once again wide-awake, she discovers the knitting her Aunt Lucille had pressed into her hands at her Aunt Roz's shivah, under a pile of clothes on the rug at her feet. Intrigued, she tries a stitch, surprised she can remember the "spike, loop, swish" knitting motion. One stitch turns into an entire row. Scottie feels the tension leaving her shoulders. Without thinking, she crams her knitting into her book bag as she prepares to leave for school.

Under pressure with Amanda and her new friends at lunch, Scottie whips out her swatch and ball of yarn and begins knitting. So much for being invisible. Scottie becomes so hooked on knitting that she goes in search of a store named KnitWit and finds herself staying for a free class offered by the owner, Alice. Fate intervenes and Amanda shows up, along with other girls from her school, Tay and Bella.

It doesn't take long before they become the "Chicks with Sticks" and Scottie finds comfort in finally belonging somewhere. But will the feeling last? It seems friends are dropping as often as she drops stitches. Amanda deserts her to free-form with her new knitting friends after her Learning Disability session at the college. Bella becomes so engrossed in knitting that she prefers solitude with her afghan. And Tay blames Scottie for the problems between her and Josh. And when she finally gets the nerve to tell her parents that she's a knitter, they get all excited that she's decided to be a "fiber artist," whatever that is. She turns to Alice only to find KnitWit's doors are closed on their meeting night.

Elizabeth Lenhard has created a warm, woolly read in IT'S A PURL THING. As a knitter, I found myself itching to grab my needles and feel the familiar comfort of K3, P3 of my current work-in-progress in soft homespun lavender. Teens are taking up their needles and creating beautiful works of art. I encourage you to join them. But before you do, take a moment to curl up with IT'S A PURL THING.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Cana Rensberger for TeensReadToo.com

Fifteen-year-old Scottie has trains roaring through her dreams at night, resulting in hours of early morning insomnia. It's been like this since Aunt Roz's funeral. To make it worse, she's begun to feel like a stranger in her own home-turned-art gallery. Her mother spends days in a trance creating bizarre paintings that have become the new "must-have" art, and her dad spends hours on the phone schmoozing potential buyers and scheduling the next art party.

Scottie's parents don't seem to remember she exists and Scottie fears that she's becoming invisible to her best friend, Amanda, as well. Amanda has left her for the popular clique as she developed curves that Scottie is, so far, lacking. Scottie's life is falling apart. Only a ball of yarn and a couple of needles keep her from becoming completely frayed.

Early one morning, once again wide-awake, she discovers the knitting her Aunt Lucille had pressed into her hands at her Aunt Roz's shivah, under a pile of clothes on the rug at her feet. Intrigued, she tries a stitch, surprised she can remember the "spike, loop, swish" knitting motion. One stitch turns into an entire row. Scottie feels the tension leaving her shoulders. Without thinking, she crams her knitting into her book bag as she prepares to leave for school.

Under pressure with Amanda and her new friends at lunch, Scottie whips out her swatch and ball of yarn and begins knitting. So much for being invisible. Scottie becomes so hooked on knitting that she goes in search of a store named KnitWit and finds herself staying for a free class offered by the owner, Alice. Fate intervenes and Amanda shows up, along with other girls from her school, Tay and Bella.

It doesn't take long before they become the "Chicks with Sticks" and Scottie finds comfort in finally belonging somewhere. But will the feeling last? It seems friends are dropping as often as she drops stitches. Amanda deserts her to free-form with her new knitting friends after her Learning Disability session at the college. Bella becomes so engrossed in knitting that she prefers solitude with her afghan. And Tay blames Scottie for the problems between her and Josh. And when she finally gets the nerve to tell her parents that she's a knitter, they get all excited that she's decided to be a "fiber artist," whatever that is. She turns to Alice only to find KnitWit's doors are closed on their meeting night.

Elizabeth Lenhard has created a warm, woolly read in IT'S A PURL THING. As a knitter, I found myself itching to grab my needles and feel the familiar comfort of K3, P3 of my current work-in-progress in soft homespun lavender. Teens are taking up their needles and creating beautiful works of art. I encourage you to join them. But before you do, take a moment to curl up with IT'S A PURL THING.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Cana Rensberger for TeensReadToo.com

Fifteen-year-old Scottie has trains roaring through her dreams at night, resulting in hours of early morning insomnia. It's been like this since Aunt Roz's funeral. To make it worse, she's begun to feel like a stranger in her own home-turned-art gallery. Her mother spends days in a trance creating bizarre paintings that have become the new "must-have" art, and her dad spends hours on the phone schmoozing potential buyers and scheduling the next art party.

Scottie's parents don't seem to remember she exists and Scottie fears that she's becoming invisible to her best friend, Amanda, as well. Amanda has left her for the popular clique as she developed curves that Scottie is, so far, lacking. Scottie's life is falling apart. Only a ball of yarn and a couple of needles keep her from becoming completely frayed.

Early one morning, once again wide-awake, she discovers the knitting her Aunt Lucille had pressed into her hands at her Aunt Roz's shivah, under a pile of clothes on the rug at her feet. Intrigued, she tries a stitch, surprised she can remember the "spike, loop, swish" knitting motion. One stitch turns into an entire row. Scottie feels the tension leaving her shoulders. Without thinking, she crams her knitting into her book bag as she prepares to leave for school.

Under pressure with Amanda and her new friends at lunch, Scottie whips out her swatch and ball of yarn and begins knitting. So much for being invisible. Scottie becomes so hooked on knitting that she goes in search of a store named KnitWit and finds herself staying for a free class offered by the owner, Alice. Fate intervenes and Amanda shows up, along with other girls from her school, Tay and Bella.

It doesn't take long before they become the "Chicks with Sticks" and Scottie finds comfort in finally belonging somewhere. But will the feeling last? It seems friends are dropping as often as she drops stitches. Amanda deserts her to free-form with her new knitting friends after her Learning Disability session at the college. Bella becomes so engrossed in knitting that she prefers solitude with her afghan. And Tay blames Scottie for the problems between her and Josh. And when she finally gets the nerve to tell her parents that she's a knitter, they get all excited that she's decided to be a "fiber artist," whatever that is. She turns to Alice only to find KnitWit's doors are closed on their meeting night.

Elizabeth Lenhard has created a warm, woolly read in IT'S A PURL THING. As a knitter, I found myself itching to grab my needles and feel the familiar comfort of K3, P3 of my current work-in-progress in soft homespun lavender. Teens are taking up their needles and creating beautiful works of art. I encourage you to join them. But before you do, take a moment to curl up with IT'S A PURL THING.
reviewed Chicks With Sticks 3: Knitwise on + 50 more book reviews
Scottie's life is changing and not for the better. She feels like she's losing her best friend and her mom is now the new 'it' girl of Chicago's art world. Then she discovers KnitWit the local yarn store and meets new friends. Soon the stitches and friendships become so intertwined it's hard to remember which came first - the girls or the purls.