Discussion Forums - Science Fiction

Topic: I have no clue about science fiction....help

Club rule - Please, if you cannot be courteous and respectful, do not post in this forum.
Page:   Unlock Forum posting with Annual Membership.
Subject: I have no clue about science fiction....help
Date Posted: 5/21/2010 9:24 PM ET
Member Since: 1/10/2009
Posts: 207
Back To Top

My nephew is not liking the fantasy books I'm sending him. He wants science fiction (space books). Are there any series books available or special offers to be had. They need to be in paperback form.

Date Posted: 5/22/2010 3:20 AM ET
Member Since: 12/9/2007
Posts: 9,601
Back To Top

How old is he?

Ruth

Subject: Ruth....
Date Posted: 5/22/2010 9:18 PM ET
Member Since: 1/10/2009
Posts: 207
Back To Top

Mid thirties

Date Posted: 5/22/2010 9:48 PM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
Posts: 15,384
Back To Top

John Scalzi  Old Man's War

Date Posted: 5/23/2010 10:46 AM ET
Member Since: 4/9/2009
Posts: 360
Back To Top

I hope these are gifts, right? Cause a mid thirties guy should really be buying his own stuff ;-)

Date Posted: 5/23/2010 9:51 PM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
Posts: 15,384
Back To Top

I know I order books sent to family members.  They give me books to post.  I order books for them.  PBS is especially great for sending books to family members who are in the service. 

And it has been wonderful for getting books for my niece's classroom.  She is a second year teacher in a school with serious budget cuts.  Her first graders would not have books to take home to read if not for PBS book deals.  (The school library was closed due to the cut backs.)

Date Posted: 5/24/2010 5:56 PM ET
Member Since: 5/16/2010
Posts: 6,261
Back To Top

Piers Anthony - Bio of a Space Tyrant is an excellent series.

Date Posted: 5/24/2010 8:15 PM ET
Member Since: 4/9/2009
Posts: 360
Back To Top

ahh, like a family co-op. That is cool!

Date Posted: 5/24/2010 9:32 PM ET
Member Since: 1/10/2009
Posts: 207
Back To Top

Like a family co-op....kind of. My nephew is unable to purchase his own books at this time. He's in a 'recuperation' mode and needs all of the help he can get from us. The books are a nice destraction from everyday life.

Date Posted: 5/25/2010 2:05 PM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
Posts: 15,384
Back To Top

We really need to know more about what he likes.  SF really covers a wide range. 

That said, I'd recommend Lois McMaster Bujold series about Miles.  Covers just about everything.  Humor, family, war, and silly uniforms.

Date Posted: 5/25/2010 5:03 PM ET
Member Since: 6/4/2007
Posts: 2,941
Back To Top

I think Orson Scott Card's "Ender" series would be a safe bet, as well as Frank Herbert's "Dune" novels (the original six by Herbert himself, at least to start).  Both are extremely popular and excellent examples of the genre.

The Ender's Game series:

  1. Ender's Game (1985) - Nebula Award winner, 1985;[1] Hugo Award winner, 1986;[1] Locus Award nominee, 1986[1]
  2. Speaker for the Dead (1986) - Nebula Award winner, 1986;[1] Hugo & Locus Awards winner, 1987;[1] Campbell Award nominee, 1987[1]
  3. Xenocide (1991) - Hugo and Locus Awards nominee, 1992[6]
  4. Children of the Mind (1996)
  5. Ender's Shadow (1999) - Shortlisted for a Locus Award, 2000[7]
  6. Shadow of the Hegemon (2001) - Shortlisted for a Locus Award, 2002[8]
  7. Shadow Puppets (2002)
  8. First Meetings (2002) - short story collection
  9. Shadow of the Giant (2005)
  10. A War of Gifts: An Ender Story (2007)
  11. Ender in Exile (2008)

The Dune Chronicles:

  1. Dune: Serial publication: Analog, December 1963 ? February 1964 (Part I, as "Dune World"), and January ? May 1965 (Parts II and III, as "The Prophet of Dune"). First edition: Philadelphia: Chilton Books, 1965.
  2. Dune Messiah: Serial publication: Galaxy, July ? November 1969. First edition: New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1970.
  3. Children of Dune: Serial publication: Analog, January ? April 1976, "Children of Dune". First edition: New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1976.
  4. God Emperor of Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1981.
  5. Heretics of Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1984.
  6. Chapterhouse: Dune, New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1985.
Subject: Okay, this is what I know....
Date Posted: 5/25/2010 5:48 PM ET
Member Since: 1/10/2009
Posts: 207
Back To Top

He's an absolute Star Wars freak! He's read all the books, bought all the figurines, posters, movies....etc.

I'm not sure he would be crazy about Star Trek.

The Dune series may be a go. I've wondered about Orson Scott Card. I don't know anything about the Miles series. I'll have to check it out.

 

Thanks! Saray

Date Posted: 5/25/2010 7:03 PM ET
Member Since: 4/5/2008
Posts: 1,869
Back To Top

Many people like the David Weber Honor Harrington series.  Lots of space and action.  An older author is Asimov who has a group of robot books and also the foundation series.  Jack McDevitt has two series I think.  Your nephew might like the Orphan series from Buetner (sp?)  They are pretty funny to me. The suggestion of the Scalzi series is a good one.  I've read the first of that one and am going to read the rest.

Subject: thanks....Jeanette
Date Posted: 5/25/2010 7:19 PM ET
Member Since: 1/10/2009
Posts: 207
Back To Top

I will add your books on the list of suggestions...

Date Posted: 5/26/2010 8:53 PM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2007
Posts: 2,387
Back To Top

Does he have access to the internet?  He could browse Amazon and/or PBS and give you a list of things he likes so you won't have to guess.  I do this with my niece since I don't want to waste credits on things she's not interested in and what interesting to me is not always so to her.

Date Posted: 5/27/2010 11:30 AM ET
Member Since: 2/28/2009
Posts: 842
Back To Top

I second Orson Scott Card - The Ender Wiggins books. They are the best science fiction ever.

I also highly recommend Ann McCaffrey - Freedom's Landing, Freedom's Challenge, Freedom's Ransom and another one I can't remember.  An excellent series about evil aliens invading earth, enslaving all earth people, pillage the planet and the fight of the earth people to get their freedom back.

Date Posted: 5/28/2010 1:06 PM ET
Member Since: 2/26/2009
Posts: 22
Back To Top

It sounds like he may be interested in space opera.  Here's a list of books I've enjoyed from that genre.

*These authors have all written Star Wars novels.



Last Edited on: 5/28/10 1:20 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 5/28/2010 2:50 PM ET
Member Since: 2/28/2006
Posts: 64
Back To Top

Heinlein books are great for space.  Connie Willis Doomsday Book and To Say Nothing of the Dog for time travel. Robert Charles Wilson's Spin.  Lois McMaster Bujold's Miles Vorkosigan series can't be beat, and it's got space travel (very funny as well).

Date Posted: 5/29/2010 1:25 PM ET
Member Since: 9/15/2009
Posts: 10
Back To Top

If he is in his thirties he won't like Card's Ender's Game series. It's written for young adults of about middle school age (and really isn't all that good anyway). I'm really into Ursual K. Le Guin right now, but that's not exactly very spacy or terribly action packed, which is what I gather you're looking for. Still I would maybe reccomend her if you read the back of the book and find one that sounds right. Some of her earlier work might be more what you're looking for, and her writing style is incredible. She could write about pain drying and I would read it.

Have you tried any Stevenson? Snow Crash is one of the best sci-fi books I've ever read. It is in the cyperpunk subgenre, so it doesn't have space, but it does have pretty much everything else:hacking, cults, drugs, religion, evil plots, ancient Sumerians, virtual reality, a futuristic dystopia, and samurai swords. It's pretty awesome, and very action packed, especially towards the end. It's also pretty funny in places.

Subject: You people are great!
Date Posted: 5/29/2010 7:43 PM ET
Member Since: 1/10/2009
Posts: 207
Back To Top

No access to the Internet for him.

You have given me more suggestions than I expected. I've printed out the lists twice, now. I'll take your suggestions with me as I do my garage sales and book sales. Then I can pick up more here.

Thanks, thanks, thanks!!

Sarah

Sianeka - ,
Date Posted: 6/8/2010 6:49 PM ET
Member Since: 2/8/2007
Posts: 6,630
Back To Top

I don't agree with Emily regarding the Ender's series being limited to young adults, but although the premise involves space and the universe, it really isn't a "space-oriented" story.  It's more about interspace politics.  I highly recommend the series, and I'm not a young adult anymore.

I agree that Snow Crash was an excellent read, but not all Neal Stephenson books are like that book.  Some of his writings are really intellectual, and harder to get into.

C.J. Cherryh's Alliance-Union universe is a good space-oriented series.

Isaac Asimov's Foundation Series is also a good Spacey action series, and a classic.

Date Posted: 6/9/2010 8:26 AM ET
Member Since: 2/28/2009
Posts: 842
Back To Top

I also don't agree with Emily on the Ender Series.  The first book 'Ender's Game' may have been intended for young adults, but it took off from there.

The Ender series is actually a lot about politics, warfare, social and humane aspects of life and how we deal with alien life forms.

Actually the book ended up on the Marine Corps Commander Reading List and is highly requested by Operation Paperback as reading material for the troops.  Just because it does not have a lot of violence and s** scenes does not make it less grown-up. 

Subject: David Drake
Date Posted: 6/12/2010 9:14 PM ET
Member Since: 1/2/2010
Posts: 69
Back To Top

David Drake has several Series of his own.  There is Hammer's Slammers about futuristic tanks and mercenaries.  There is the Lieutenant Leary commanding Series that starts with a book titled "With the Lightenings". 

Eric Flint has several series going.  there is the Boundary series, Looking Glass series, 1632 series and several individual books. 

Travis Taylor also has some books out that are hard science fiction, the guys an engineer and physicist.  I've read his "One Day on Mars", sort of a SF type of 24 Hours and its sequal Tau Ceti Agenda.  They were pretty good.

David Weber, Lois McMaser Bujold, Anne McCaffrey are also very good recommendations.

Date Posted: 6/21/2010 12:40 PM ET
Member Since: 3/27/2010
Posts: 51
Back To Top

I would also have to disagree with Emily about Ender's Game. It's one of the best Sci-Fi books out there, and can appeal to anyone, of any age. It really hits home to those that can associate with Ender, which includes the young adult age bracket, or anyone that ever felt they were different for being smart -- or wants to understand the world of a smart child.

Date Posted: 6/22/2010 2:17 PM ET
Member Since: 5/16/2010
Posts: 6,261
Back To Top

I agree with Emily and so does Amazon who puts Ender's Game in the Young Adult reading level. Then again there are people who think Harry Potter and Twilight aren't kids books. I couldn't get too far into Ender's Game before I returned it to the library . Just wasn't a book I liked.

Page: