Book Reviews of Confessions of a Slacker Mom

Confessions of a Slacker Mom
Confessions of a Slacker Mom
Author: Muffy Mead-Ferro
ISBN-13: 9780738210469
ISBN-10: 0738210463
Pages: 137
Rating:
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
 57

3.5 stars, based on 57 ratings
Publisher: Lifelong Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

17 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 5 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 7
I LOVED this book. It's a very short read. It took me about an hour. She puts into words all of the things I have thought since my son was born.

For a long time, I've been appalled by what some people consider parenting. Some people are completely obsessed with making sure their kid fits in with every other kid. To do this, they buy their kids every "right" toy they can get their hands on. They shower them with all the "right" clothes and shoes. They push their kids to ben involved in every stinking activity known to man.

It's okay if you don't do all of that! I found myself saying YES! throughout the entire book. It's a good read.
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on
Helpful Score: 3
Love this book! Talks about how so many children today have their lives micromanaged by their parents and how it is so unnecessary and causes unneeded frustration. Great book, highly recommended for all moms who often feel that mommy-guilt for not doing "enough" for their kids. Hilarious, quick read! A "feel good" book that banishes some of the all-too-well-known "mommy guilt"!
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 85 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Hilarious. A little over the top sometimes for someone who does many of the things she makes fun of!
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 4 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I agree with her theories, but she does come off as a snot, and she really just repeats the same ideas. Nice to feel someone agrees with your parenting style, though.
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 8 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
An entertaining book that reads almost like a journal or a series of letters to a friend. There's more anecdotes and advice than information here, but it's an uplifting, fun read and a reminder that sometimes, Mother really does know best.
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 103 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Very enjoyable read, especially for moms who have a hard time trying to "do it all".
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on
Helpful Score: 1
I liked this book, she actually made a lot of good points that I agree with which sort of balanced out the stuff I didn't agree with :o)
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 26 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Quick read
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 35 more book reviews
this book okay...just not what I expected.
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 19 more book reviews
Had some funny parts but I found the book to be "preachy"
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 213 more book reviews
Great! Loved it!
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 160 more book reviews
I LOVED this book. So easy to read and relate to, as well as humorous and comforting. Definitely one to re-read.
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on
Too much information about how the author and her siblings were brought up on a ranch. I think that Muffy's childhood and her experience growing up in a rural area was too different from my own for me to relate to her and her own parenting style.
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on
Great, quick read. Of all the books on parenting that I have read on how to be a parent this was the best advice I have read so far! :) Though it wasn't as funny as I thought it would be, from reading the title. Mead-Ferro reminds us that past generations have raised children w/o many of the toys, gadgets, and statistical information that we are bombarded with today.

I gathered the best way to raise a child is to allow them to think for themselves and DO for themselves. They WILL learn and are capable of so much more than we give them credit for.

I highly recommend this to new parents especially! I wish I had read this when I had my first child!
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 8 more book reviews
This was a complete waste of time, thankfully it's only 136 pages showing she's a slacker writer too. I am a stay at home mom and she hates that. She basically thinks we are harming our children and blah blah blah, I seriously can't believe I wasted my time on that crap. I wouldn't recommend this book to my friends even if they are working moms. I wouldn't even recommend this book to my enemies so they won't waste their time. I just hate the way she looks down on stay at home moms.
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 50 more book reviews
"the slacker mom speaks:
I think parents probably have better instincts than they know. You don't have to be a pediatrician or a child psychologist or an academicican to have some inborn wisdowm about raising your child. You just have to be a mom or dad with a sense of what's practical, and a willingness to listen to your inner voice, instead of bowing to the inevitable pressure of "perfect parenting" messages.
reviewed Confessions of a Slacker Mom on + 46 more book reviews
From Publishers Weekly: A welcome relief from the flood of how-to-mother-perfectly tomes, Mead-Ferro's short and sweet book is a reminder not to take parenthood so seriously. The author, who in addition to being the mother of two young children also has a demanding career as an advertising copywriter, has drawn valuable lessons in "making do" from her grandmother, who "had none of the proper equipment by today's standards" yet "never described motherhood as a hardship." Mead-Ferro doesn't care for creating clever scrapbooks, accessorizing the nursery or trying to impart baby genius status to her three-year-old. Rather, she teaches her children that "making do" with their imagination is as good a route to inspiring creativity as any educational toy. She believes in letting her kids learn that the physical world is a complicated place; it's better than smothering, isolating and "child-proofing" the world for them, she says. Rejecting the mentality that results in pre-school admission anxiety attacks and overly competitive soccer leagues for six-year-olds, Mead-Ferro both soothes and inspires as she prompts parents, and mothers in particular, to trust their own instincts rather than that of the "experts." Let the kids get messy, she says, and let them figure some things out for themselves. While Mead-Ferro's not at all sheepish about labeling this approach similar to that of a "slacker," readers will come away with the feeling that the author is in fact a wise veteran who has experienced many of the conflicting messages women face today, and who nevertheless comes up smiling.
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