Book Reviews of In Confidence: : Moscow's Ambassador to America's Six Cold War Presidents (1962-1986)

In Confidence: : Moscow's Ambassador to America's Six Cold War Presidents (1962-1986)
In Confidence Moscow's Ambassador to America's Six Cold War Presidents - 1962-1986
Author: Anatoly Dobrynin
ISBN-13: 9780812923285
ISBN-10: 0812923286
Publication Date: 9/11/1995
Pages: 672
Rating:
  ?

0 stars, based on 0 rating
Publisher: Crown
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed In Confidence: : Moscow's Ambassador to America's Six Cold War Presidents (1962-1986) on + 74 more book reviews
The introduction says this book was written from notes made at the time of the meetings. It shows. It is much like reading an unedited diary, and no matter how interesting your life is, chances are that your diary contains things of no interest to anyone except possibly yourself. Do I really need to know, for example, that Nancy Reagan wanted a Russian religious icon that was pretty even if it didn't have historic value? I honestly can't imagine why.

Also, there are numerous typos in the book which get quite distracting - of instead of or, for example, and at one point this country was referred to as the United states. Granted, this is a minor quibble, but it's an unnecessary one as a good editor could have caught and corrected these mistakes easily.

There are some fascinating tidbits in here. The relationship between Brezhnev and Nixon is quite interesting. The author's view of the development of Soviet/U.S. relations during the Reagan years is also worth reading. But to get to the interesting bits, you have to go through some mind-numbing tedium.

The best part of this book is the last 20 pages or so that deal with the overthrow of Mikhail Gorbachev, told from the perspective of Russian who is also a high ranking party member. Like most Westerners, I was surprised by this turn of events and reading about events as he saw them was enlightening. But it isn't enough to make the book as a whole worth the reading.

For serious students of U.S./Soviet relations only.