Book Reviews of Counterfeit Son

Counterfeit Son
Counterfeit Son
Author: Elaine Marie Alphin
ISBN-13: 9780142301470
ISBN-10: 0142301477
Publication Date: 7/8/2002
Pages: 192
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 14

4.2 stars, based on 14 ratings
Publisher: Puffin
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

7 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Counterfeit Son on + 25 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Cameron grows up as the child of a serial killer. His serial killer father is killed and he takes up the identity of Neil one of his father's victims. This book is the story of how he adjusts to his new family and the secret life he wishes to supress. The book is well written, and slightly believable dispite the premise. I found it to be very predictable, but am not so sure its as transparent to others, however kept reading to see how the book would play out. One of the reviews on the book praises the author's ability to be realistic with the character's reactions, I disagree however I don't find it bad a choice on the author's part she opts out of some of the darker drama and emotions that would be associated with Cameron and Neil's family making it suitable for a young adult audience. Overall I was impressed with the book, and couldn't put it down.
reviewed Counterfeit Son on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Sally Kruger aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.com

For years, a young boy lives with a serial killer and witnesses horrible acts of abuse and killing. Convinced that he has been "bad" and the beatings he receives are intended to correct his behavior, he follows the orders of his captor by attending school daily as if nothing is wrong, appearing in public places calmly and quietly, and returning to help his captor hide evidence and bury the bodies of other not-so-lucky boys.

When the serial killer is finally caught in a police raid, the young boy, who for years has been told he is the son of the killer, decides his only chance for a better life is to pretend to be one the missing boys. Neil Lacey's parents can hardly believe that the son they lost six years ago has been returned. Although at least one detective is suspicious of such a happy ending, they take Neil home and try to resume a normal family life.

Neil still thinks of himself as Cameron, and in his mind, he thinks of his cruel abuser as Pop. With knowledge he gained from newspaper clippings recounting stories of the missing Neil Lacey, he hopes to fool his new family. Between fear of discovery and the fear that the horrible beatings and other abuse he suffered at the hands of Pop will somehow return, Neil tries to settle in and renew relationships with his parents and brother and sister.

As the days and weeks after his rescue pass, Neil feels less and less secure. His sister, Diana, claims to have doubts that he is really her brother, and forensic testing on the bodies of the killer's victims might still ruin everything. Can he possibly pull this off? And why is he feeling more and more like maybe he might actually be Neil Lacey?

COUNTERFEIT SON is the type of story you might expect to watch on some TV docu-drama. It's the amazing story of survival of a kidnap victim being reunited with anxious family members, but with twists and turns that make this a riveting adventure. Author Elaine Marie Alphin creates an immediate emotional attachment to Neil. Whether he is the long-lost kidnap victim or the abused son of the maniac doesn't really seem to matter. His character will captivate readers and their desire to know his complete story make this book excellent reading.
reviewed Counterfeit Son on + 31 more book reviews
Very touching and interesting book - a must read.
reviewed Counterfeit Son on + 22 more book reviews
Loved this book! The characters are multidimentional and intriging. Suspenseful!
reviewed Counterfeit Son on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Sally Kruger aka "Readingjunky" for TeensReadToo.com

For years, a young boy lives with a serial killer and witnesses horrible acts of abuse and killing. Convinced that he has been "bad" and the beatings he receives are intended to correct his behavior, he follows the orders of his captor by attending school daily as if nothing is wrong, appearing in public places calmly and quietly, and returning to help his captor hide evidence and bury the bodies of other not-so-lucky boys.

When the serial killer is finally caught in a police raid, the young boy, who for years has been told he is the son of the killer, decides his only chance for a better life is to pretend to be one the missing boys. Neil Lacey's parents can hardly believe that the son they lost six years ago has been returned. Although at least one detective is suspicious of such a happy ending, they take Neil home and try to resume a normal family life.

Neil still thinks of himself as Cameron, and in his mind, he thinks of his cruel abuser as Pop. With knowledge he gained from newspaper clippings recounting stories of the missing Neil Lacey, he hopes to fool his new family. Between fear of discovery and the fear that the horrible beatings and other abuse he suffered at the hands of Pop will somehow return, Neil tries to settle in and renew relationships with his parents and brother and sister.

As the days and weeks after his rescue pass, Neil feels less and less secure. His sister, Diana, claims to have doubts that he is really her brother, and forensic testing on the bodies of the killer's victims might still ruin everything. Can he possibly pull this off? And why is he feeling more and more like maybe he might actually be Neil Lacey?

COUNTERFEIT SON is the type of story you might expect to watch on some TV docu-drama. It's the amazing story of survival of a kidnap victim being reunited with anxious family members, but with twists and turns that make this a riveting adventure. Author Elaine Marie Alphin creates an immediate emotional attachment to Neil. Whether he is the long-lost kidnap victim or the abused son of the maniac doesn't really seem to matter. His character will captivate readers and their desire to know his complete story make this book excellent reading.
reviewed Counterfeit Son on + 2 more book reviews
This book was so good! It has a couple of depressing parts, and the main character really sounded like he'd been through what it said he'd been through. I cried in parts of it, and I wholly recommend the book. Not appropriate for those under 10 at least.
reviewed Counterfeit Son on + 138 more book reviews
I started this book looking to research another take on Stockholm Syndrome but was quickly engrossed in an intrigueingly fresh look at trauma and self image as seen from a teen's perspective. Though this is a young adult book, I wondered if it might be too intense for some younger readers.