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Topic: Got a couple Million Pounds to spare?

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Subject: Got a couple Million Pounds to spare?
Date Posted: 6/5/2010 10:47 AM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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I wish!  http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010/jun/01/sothebys-auction-first-editions-books

Date Posted: 6/5/2010 11:02 AM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2008
Posts: 10,479
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Isn't it amazing that these books are so well preserved?? I have to admire that - real book lovers originally owned these!!

Date Posted: 6/5/2010 11:41 AM ET
Member Since: 10/29/2005
Posts: 3,823
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As much as I love books, I don't have any real desire to own rare and priceless ones. Even if I had a million pounds just lying around, I'd spend it all on new books that I haven't read yet. ;-)

I do agree with Jeanne though - it's wonderful that these old, rare books are preserved and treasured by someone!

Date Posted: 6/5/2010 1:28 PM ET
Member Since: 5/19/2007
Posts: 4,716
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But can you imagine how difficult it must be to part with this collection?  I love old books, especially children's books.  While I too buy mostly new books, I have been known to put out a bit of change for 1st editions.  Just not 15 million pounds of change..blush

Date Posted: 6/5/2010 3:04 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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Vicki if you had a few million pounds in change, I would hope that you would look at my wish list and say "Why Not"  Then  a few weeks later I would be visited by the book fairy..............

Date Posted: 6/5/2010 5:58 PM ET
Member Since: 12/10/2005
Posts: 2,851
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As much as I love books, I don't have any real desire to own rare and priceless ones.

Well certainly not if you're gonna explode squash all over em! Jeez!

Date Posted: 6/7/2010 10:47 AM ET
Member Since: 8/17/2009
Posts: 1,588
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That is just amazing.  I don't know how one could bear to part with such a collection, or even break it up.

I never thought much about first/early editions, either, until a few years ago.  To me, the value of books is their content, and for the most part, I'd rather have a mmpb, because it's cheap and small.  They won't last hundreds of years, but they'll outlast me, should I want to re-read it, and that's all I care about. 

My favorite book of all time is McCullough's John Adams.  I adore John Adams (but not in a hunk of history sort of way!)  Seven years ago, I came across a 1830 second edition of John Adam's "A Treatise on the Principles and Practice of the Action of Ejectment."  I couldn't believe how very badly I wanted it.  I sat there on the floor of the antique section of the bookstore, just stroking it, almost in tears.  And after walking away, went back again.  I don't recall the price, but it was a LOT more than I could justify spending. I still keep the business card of the lady who operated the antique section of that bookstore. No earthly reason why, because even if they still had the book, I still couldn't justify spending that much.  But I just can't let it go. Obviously, it had nothing to do with the content of the book--a law treatise 180 years out of date!  It was strictly because it was ADAMS.

So for the right book and/or author, I could maybe go nuts about a first edition.  But it would be the result of a very personal, VERY strong feeling about the book and/or author.  And I'm pretty sure it would have to be a very OLD book, too.  My second favorite book is Michael Shaara's Killer Angels, but the thought of a first edition doesn't phase me.

Date Posted: 6/7/2010 1:37 PM ET
Member Since: 3/23/2008
Posts: 2,503
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Sharla:  I loved John Adams too.  By the end of the book I felt like he and Abigail were friends of mine.  I just re-watched the mini -series a few weeks ago as I felt I was going into John Adams withdrawal for some odd reason.  I don't keep a lot of biographies, but that is one I don't think I could bear to part with.

Date Posted: 6/7/2010 5:31 PM ET
Member Since: 8/17/2009
Posts: 1,588
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Same here, Cheryl.  I knew he died July4, 1826 and I just kept getting sadder as I was reading, counting down the years and months.   It really was like watching a friend die.  One thing near the end really stayed with me.  His letter to his granddaughter where he says something like, "The older I get, the less I know, but it all comes down to this:  Do justice, love mercy, walk humbly." 

Date Posted: 6/7/2010 7:31 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 9,174
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Do justice, love mercy, walk humbly."  Love this!

Date Posted: 6/7/2010 11:19 PM ET
Member Since: 3/23/2008
Posts: 2,503
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I loved the fact that he and Thomas Jefferson died on the same day and that they were the last two signers of the Declaration of Independence left alive at the time.  It was wonderful that those 2 men were able to re-connect their friendship with each other in their latter years after so many years' estrangement due to politics.