Book Reviews of Crazy English

Crazy English
Crazy English
Author: Richard Lederer
ISBN-13: 9780671689070
ISBN-10: 067168907X
Publication Date: 9/1/1990
Pages: 188
Edition: Reissue
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 3.4/5 Stars.
 5

3.4 stars, based on 5 ratings
Publisher: Pocket
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

5 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Crazy English on + 101 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
One of the most unforgettable moments of my youth was learning the word pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis. I was in third grade. So what if Richard Lederer has come up with a chemical compound that consists of 1,913 letters? Owning a word like pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is empowering at any age. If you have ever been completely wowed by the power you can have over language, or its power over you, Richard Lederer is your patron saint. His oft-reprinted introduction to Crazy English, which was originally published in 1989, claims that English is "the most loopy and wiggy of all tongues." And then he demonstrates: "In what other language do people drive in a parkway and park in a driveway? ... Why do they call them apartments when they're all together?" And so on. Lederer's pace is frenetic. He alights on oxymorons ("pretty ugly," "computer jock"), redundancies, confusing words (are you sure you know the meaning of enormity?), phobias, contronyms, heteronyms, retroactive terms (acoustic guitar, rotary phone), and a host of other linguistic delights.
reviewed Crazy English on + 1217 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Explores the intricacies and idiocies of the English language, presenting palindromes, phobias, quizzes, riddles, and other challenges of the language.

One of the most unforgettable moments of my youth was learning the word pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis. I was in third grade. So what if Richard Lederer has come up with a chemical compound that consists of 1,913 letters? Owning a word like pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is empowering at any age. If you have ever been completely wowed by the power you can have over language, or its power over you, Richard Lederer is your patron saint. His oft-reprinted introduction to Crazy English, which was originally published in 1989, claims that English is "the most loopy and wiggy of all tongues." And then he demonstrates: "In what other language do people drive in a parkway and park in a driveway? ... Why do they call them apartments when they're all together?" And so on. Lederer's pace is frenetic. He alights on oxymorons ("pretty ugly," "computer jock"), redundancies, confusing words (are you sure you know the meaning of enormity?), phobias, contronyms, heteronyms, retroactive terms (acoustic guitar, rotary phone), and a host of other linguistic delights.

Though English may be one of the crazier languages--Lederer claims that about 80 percent of our words are not spelled phonetically--they are all, he says, a little crazy. "That's because language is invented ... by boys and girls and men and women, not computers. As such, language reflects the creative and fearful asymmetry of the human race, which, of course, isn't really a race at all."
reviewed Crazy English on + 164 more book reviews
So why do we park in a driveway and drive on parkways? This book answers that question and SOOO many more. Great as a reference, or simply a laugh, it takes basic english and latin background to explain some of the quirkier things in our language. Have fun!!!!!
reviewed Crazy English on + 174 more book reviews
If you like words and the English language, you'll love this.
reviewed Crazy English on + 3352 more book reviews
From Back of Book: In what other language, asks Lederer, do people drive in a parkway and park in a driveway, play at a recital and recite at a play? Lederer frolics through the logic-boggling byways of our language.

Looks at confusable English, Hetronyms, violent English, foxen in the henhice, alliteration, ailihphilia, and a great deal more.