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Topic: DAW Science Fiction

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Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Subject: DAW Science Fiction
Date Posted: 8/23/2008 4:54 PM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
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Does nyone know where I can find a complete list of DAW Science Fiction releases?  I have a bunch and was thinking of collecting the rest...but I can't find a list of titles anywhere.

Date Posted: 8/23/2008 7:50 PM ET
Member Since: 6/4/2007
Posts: 2,941
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Here's a fan site list of DAW books http://www.sfsite.com/~silverag/daw1-100.html

I found the site by looking up DAW Science Fiction on Wikipedia.  You can find some titles listed here under Donald Wollheim's name (sometimes listed as editor, both versions appear in the author field).

Hope that helps!

Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 8/23/2008 8:22 PM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
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Thanks!  That's exactly what I was looking for.  I know I saw the Wikipedia article before, but I guess I didn't look at the links well enough.

Date Posted: 9/6/2008 4:07 PM ET
Member Since: 1/6/2006
Posts: 11
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I've been collecting the Daw Books (yellow spines) for years. It's pretty cool as they are generally inexpensive and all are great books by great authors. It's really a worthwhile collection for any dedicated Science Fiction fan.

I don't know how many I have right now (maybe my next chore) but I like to see the shelves I have dedicated for this collection and see all that yellow. Knowing that I can pick one at random and be sure to enjoy reading it ... again.

Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 9/6/2008 5:09 PM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
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Yeah, I love them.  The ones I have mostly came in various lots, and I only got the idea of collecting them when I realized how many I had...of course, then I started really putting them together and saw how many I was missing :s  But it ought to be a fun project.

Subject: smirk
Date Posted: 9/6/2008 6:26 PM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2006
Posts: 723
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Yeah, I save my low numbered DAWs too (up to #100).  Can't say they're all great though.  I recently read #35.  Baphomet's Meteor, by Pierre Barbet.  It was originally published in France in 1972 under the title, L'Empire du Baphomet and was translated into English and published by DAW the same year.  Suppose a demonic Alien (horns! and breasts!) were to crash in 12th century France, and ally himself with the Knights Templar, giving nuclear hand grenades and instructions to conquer the world! Well, then they would. End of story. Suppose Kurt Vonnegut's hack science fiction writer Kilgore Trout wrote in French! Well, then he would write a book like this. So fascinatingly bad, I enjoyed it. 

-Tom Hl. 

Subject: I finally know what you guys are talkin about!
Date Posted: 9/11/2008 6:33 PM ET
Member Since: 6/4/2007
Posts: 2,941
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Sounds like campy good fun, Tom lol.  I've been thinking that's exactly what I need more of: the laid back almost goofy science fiction.  Between Matt's enthusiasm and your last post, I figured I'd look at the list to which I had posted the link.  This is nothing to really brag about, but while looking through the DAW list I found out that I've actually GOT one:  #39 The Book of Frank Herbert which is part of my Frank Herbert collection (I'm short by 2 short story collections, The Best of Frank Herbert and The Priests of Psi). So now I at least know what the DAW books are.  It's so hard to find a respectable list of notable science fiction, but this one seems fairly diverse in it's choices.  Now I just hope it's not a major undertaking hoping to find a few of them out there.

Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 9/11/2008 10:34 PM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
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The obsession gets more complicated by the day :)  I have a couple of Cap Kennedy books by Gregory Kern (a pseudonym used by E.C. Tubb).  They are published by DAW, but they are not part of the regular DAW numbered series.  Does anyone know anything about this?  To make things more confusing, one of the later books in the series is on the list.  My head is starting to hurt...

Subject: numberless DAWs
Date Posted: 9/12/2008 8:48 PM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2006
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Well, my copy of Downbelow Station was published by DAW, but it doesn't have a DAW number anywhere I can find on it.  However, it appears on this list as #420.  And that answer is consistent with the publication date of other DAW books I have from roughly the same period.  In fact, every DAW book I have with no number, appears on this list.  So now I have numbers for them all.  Cool!

-Tom Hl.

Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 9/13/2008 12:14 AM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
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Yes, I have noticed that a lot of copies don't have the series number displayed, but aside from the Cap Kennedy books they were all assigned a number that can be found by looking back to initial publication date.  The Cap Kennedy books I have are:

#2: Slave Ship from Sergan - Oct '73

#5: Jewel of Jarhen - Feb '74

#14: The Ghosts of Epidoris - Feb '75

Which does not match any of the titles on the list on those dates. 

Subject: cap kennedy
Date Posted: 9/13/2008 10:21 AM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2006
Posts: 723
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I'm not familiar with the Cap Kennedy series, so I did some searches.  Probably nothing you haven't already done too.

I found that only #16 Beyond the Galactic Lens and #17 The Galactiad appear on the DAW numbers list.  There is also a difference in the cover art on those two.  The earlier books have a distinctive style, for example:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3271/2351040459_86d715c7eb.jpg?v=0

while the last two covers are consistent with other DAW books, for example:

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2034/2351042191_6d591af6b2.jpg?v=0

I also noticed that these books are quite short - around 120 pages.  Are they young adult books?  I speculating now.  Maybe DAW attempted to launch them as a line of books separate from their main line, but after the DAW numbering thing became an actual sales driver itself, merged them in.

I collect Tor Doubles, and have found that Tor changed their product format a few times near the end of that line.

-Tom Hl.

Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 9/13/2008 10:48 AM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
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It looks like the Cap Kennedy series used a variety of covers (I have one in another style separate from either of those you posted).  It also looks like it was a completely separate series, but then they added the last two books to the regular DAW lineup  (#'s 16 and 17 are the last according to fantasticfiction.com). 

Anyway, all the Cap Kennedy books, regardless of cover style still have the distinctive yellow spine and yellow DAW logo in the upper right hand corner.  DAW did completely change the style later...my newest yellow-spine book is from April of '84.

ETA - I notice on fantasticfiction, there is an image of the covers of a couple of Fate magazines...I think the stories were originally part of a magazine serial.



Last Edited on: 9/13/08 9:39 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Subject: Strugatski brothers
Date Posted: 9/14/2008 11:03 PM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2006
Posts: 723
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HARD TO BE A GOD, by Arkadi & Boris Strugatski, 1964.

First of all, I have to tell you that after I came home with this from my local used bookstore, I discovered it has collector value, far above the half cover price (62 cents) that I paid for it. I checked Amazon.com marketplace today, and found that the lowest price I could pay for this paperback there would be $45.00. Sheesh, I think I'm going to need a plastic bag to keep it in.

The novel was published in the Soviet Union in 1964 under the title "Trudno Byt Bogom." In 1973 it was translated to English by Wendayne Ackerman, and published as DAW #126.

Now then, it also turns out to be a really good book. On a human populated world at a medieval level of development, observers from distant Earth (from a future Soviet Union to be specific) have been given local identities, and inserted under a non-interference policy. But society is not following the roadmap that Marxist theory predicts. Fascism is supposed to rise out of industrial capitalism, not feudalism - but in the last two years the Gray Sturmoviks under Don Reba have come to threaten even the king. Don Rumata is an introspective agent of Earth, and does what he can within the confines of policy, and his own conscience. Like Genly Ai from Ursula LeGuin's The Left Hand of Darkness, Don Rumata questions the integrity of his assignment, and the nature of humanity.

This should be a classic, but is little known in this part of the world.

-Tom Hl.



Last Edited on: 9/15/08 10:24 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 9/15/2008 5:58 AM ET
Member Since: 3/1/2006
Posts: 53
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Matt, do you have #62, When the Green Star Calls by Lin Carter ? I have a copy I would be glad to send you.

Athena

Matt C. (mattc) - ,
Date Posted: 9/15/2008 11:49 AM ET
Member Since: 8/13/2008
Posts: 3,849
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Athena, as it happens I do have that one, but thank you very much for the offer.