Book Reviews of Dark Matter: The Private Life of Sir Isaac Newton

Dark Matter: The Private Life of Sir Isaac Newton
Dark Matter The Private Life of Sir Isaac Newton
Author: Philip Kerr
ISBN-13: 9780609609811
ISBN-10: 0609609815
Publication Date: 10/1/2002
Pages: 352
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 4

4.1 stars, based on 4 ratings
Publisher: Crown
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

4 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Dark Matter: The Private Life of Sir Isaac Newton on + 207 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Fairly interesting. The author's attempt at writing in the language of Newton's period was clumsy. And there were a couple of odd plot elements left hanging that could have been tied in to make a much more satisfying story.
reviewed Dark Matter: The Private Life of Sir Isaac Newton on
Nicely done. Well researched and written to be easily understood
reviewed Dark Matter: The Private Life of Sir Isaac Newton on + 412 more book reviews
Excellent historical mystery featuring Sir Issac Newton and his (fictional, I think) assisstant Christopher Ellis, taking place when Newton was Warden of the Royal Mint (as he was in real life) at the Tower of London in 1696. Well-written and richly woven with details of the period, the mystery itself is even an interesting one!
reviewed Dark Matter: The Private Life of Sir Isaac Newton on + 11 more book reviews
Imagine Sir Isaac Newton playing the role of Sherlock Holmes in London in the 1600s. Newton, late-in-life, is one of the leading officials of the British mint and, as part of his position, is in charge of investigating counterfeit coin press operations. The penalties for the crime are severe in that place and time and there is plenty of time for segues into descriptions of medieval torture and execution techniques. People are being murdered in the Tower of London and Newton is the only one that is interested in solving the mystery. Shhh, I wont spoil it.

The book is narrated by Newton s newly hired assistant. As a result of his daily association with Newton , the assistant slowly loses his religion. Newton was a genius by all accounts and, according to Kerr, did not accept the concept of the trinity (the basis for Protestantism and the Church of England). The assistant is also involved in a dalliance with Newton s niece who, as near as I can tell is Newton s only blood relative at this point in his life.

The story is interesting, is paced nicely, and draws the reader in quickly. Kerrs Character development and writing capability are nicely showcased. I did not feel as though the book closed well. In the end I am left wondering who drugged our wine and left us off from the coach - wondering where we were going in the first place.