Book Reviews of Daughters of Cain

Daughters of Cain
Daughters of Cain
Author: Colin Dexter
Audio Books swap for two (2) credits.
ISBN-13: 9780886464073
ISBN-10: 0886464072
Publication Date: 3/1996
Rating:
  • Currently 4.5/5 Stars.
 1

4.5 stars, based on 1 rating
Publisher: DH Audio
Book Type: Audio Cassette
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

9 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Daughters of Cain on + 242 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Colin Dexter's books featuring Inspector Morse are brainteasers in that it isn't easy figuring out who the murderer is in this book as well as in other Inspector Morse books. For many Americans used to myteries with action every other page, this book moves too slow. I love British mysteries but even I found this book a bit slow. However, its saving grace, like many "slow moving" British novel, is the characters depicted. Many of them are so eccentric; so private and kind of snooty. (P.D.James is the queen of the nasty character...) The type of people you love to read about but would hate to meet. The plot concerns a professor at Wolsey College, Dr. Felix McClure, who has been stabbed to death. In another part of Wolsey, three women - a housecleaner, a schoolteacher, and a prostitute - are playing out an unfolding drama of their own. As Morse puts his formidable thinking cap on, he sees the connection between Dr. Wolsey's murder and these 3 women at the end.
reviewed Daughters of Cain on + 37 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I think Dexter writes some of the best English mystery going. Inspector Morse gets sick at the sight of blood, is cantankerous and difficult to befriend but he has a way of solving crime like no other. Each book gives you a real brain teaser.
reviewed Daughters of Cain on + 91 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Another good Morse mystery for fans of British novels.
reviewed Daughters of Cain on + 318 more book reviews
Long time since I read it, but it's an Inspector Morse story, so know I enjoyed it.
reviewed Daughters of Cain on + 1139 more book reviews
The Daughters of Cain got off to a slow start for me, and my first impression of Morse (I began the series with this book) wasn't favorable. I thought he was far too eccentric, pompous, and condescending. Slowly, however, I began to see the unexpected kindnesses, the glimmer of empathy, and the underlying self-doubts. The character's complexity took me by surprise, as did the complexity of the plot. Overall, the book was engrossing, entertaining, and often challenging, in a good way, to read.
reviewed Daughters of Cain on + 122 more book reviews
The 11th book in the Inspector Morse series. Abridged - 2 cassettes, 3 hours. Read by James Nelson.
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Excellent read......
reviewed Daughters of Cain on + 25 more book reviews
It was only the second time Inspector Morse had ever taken over a murer enquiry after the preliminary -invariably dramatic- discovery and sweep of the crime scene. Secretly pleased to have missed the blood and gore, Morse and faithful Lewis go about finding the killer who stabbed Dr. Felix McClure, late of Wolsey College. In another part of Oxford, three women -a housecleaner, a schoolteacher, and a prostitute- are playing out a drama that has long been unfolding. It will take much brainwork, many pints, and not a little anguish before Morse sees the startling connections between McClure's death and the daughters of Cain....
reviewed Daughters of Cain on + 1524 more book reviews
It was only the second time Inspector Morse had ever taken over a murder enquiry after the preliminary, invariably dramatic, discovery and sweep of the crime scene. Secretly pleased to have missed the blood and gore, Morse and the faithful Lewis go about finding the killer who stabbed Dr. Felix McClure, late of Wolsey College. In another part of Oxford, three women, a housecleaner, a schoolteacher, and a prostitute, are playing out a drama that has long been unfolding. It will take much brain work, many pints, and not a little anguish before Morse sees the startling connections between McClure's death and the daughters of Cain . . .