Book Reviews of Dear Pussycat : Mash Notes and Missives from the Desk of Cosmopolitan's Legendary Editor

Dear Pussycat : Mash Notes and Missives from the Desk of Cosmopolitan's Legendary Editor
Dear Pussycat Mash Notes and Missives from the Desk of Cosmopolitan's Legendary Editor
Author: Helen Gurley Brown
ISBN-13: 9780312317577
ISBN-10: 0312317573
Publication Date: 4/1/2004
Pages: 368
Rating:
  • Currently 2.1/5 Stars.
 8

2.1 stars, based on 8 ratings
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Dear Pussycat : Mash Notes and Missives from the Desk of Cosmopolitan's Legendary Editor on + 216 more book reviews
Fun quick read that spans decades. The author, Helen Gurley Brown, was a prolific letter writer for all occassions and we see them compiled here to both celebrities and normal people.
reviewed Dear Pussycat : Mash Notes and Missives from the Desk of Cosmopolitan's Legendary Editor on + 367 more book reviews
Few of Ms. Brown's missives were terribly interesting to me. She came across as demanding yet obsequious. Expecting freebies and everything to go her way, she clearly had an annoying habit of hitting on others for goodies for herself, and a fair amount of declining favors when called upon herself. Overall, she didn't win me over during this "behind" the woman look at her letters.
reviewed Dear Pussycat : Mash Notes and Missives from the Desk of Cosmopolitan's Legendary Editor on + 245 more book reviews
Helen Gurley Brown believes that letters are the most effective-and delightful-way to communicate. Need a favor? Write a letter. Want to rave? Write a letter. Are thank-yous in order? Write a letter. Helen even occassionally uses a letter to...well...complain.
A collection of Helen's letters over the last decade or so has been gathered here. Dip into them and drop into her wold-peopled with everyone from celebritites to maitres d'hotel, bestest childhood friends to movie producers and critics. And of course there's a sampling of the letters she used to exhort and cajole colleagues and generally keep Cosmopolitan running smoothly over her many years as editor.
Helen knows the act of writing a letter can be a marvelous and personal act of self-expression. But when you rad this book, you'll learn that nothing is more deliciously intimate than reading a letter addressed to someone else.