Book Reviews of The Death of an Irish Sinner (Peter McGarr, Bk 15)

The Death of an Irish Sinner (Peter McGarr, Bk 15)
The Death of an Irish Sinner - Peter McGarr, Bk 15
Author: Bartholomew Gill
ISBN-13: 9780380808649
ISBN-10: 0380808641
Publication Date: 3/1/2002
Pages: 368
Rating:
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 9

3.9 stars, based on 9 ratings
Publisher: Avon
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Death of an Irish Sinner (Peter McGarr, Bk 15) on + 334 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I actually give this one 2.5 stars. The premise is a good one - celebrated biographer and benefactress Mary Jo Stanton is found dead on her knees in the garden of her Dublin estate, with a cilicio, a medieval belt-like equivalent of a religious hair-shirt, around her neck. Suspicion falls on the religious order she was a part of, Opus Dei, as Superintendent Peter McGarr discovers that Mary Jo was about to release in a scandalous biography that Opus Dei's founder, Jose Maria Escriva, was her fleshly and not just spiritual father. As McGarr's investigation proceeds, the danger creeps closer to his family. All things that piqued my interest, but the delivery somehow fell short. The book took me a long time to finish as it could not hold my attention for very long, and I really could not connect with any of the characters, although the writing did not have any obvious flaws. Perhaps it was because I picked up a book in the middle of a series that clearly had established ongoing plot lines with its major and supporting characters, but that doesn't usually confuse me and I've met many of my favorites that way, so I doubt I'll be trying this author again unless there's nothing else around.
reviewed The Death of an Irish Sinner (Peter McGarr, Bk 15) on + 9 more book reviews
Police detective McGarr, mystery about murders connected to Opus Dei. To grim for me.
reviewed The Death of an Irish Sinner (Peter McGarr, Bk 15) on + 158 more book reviews
powerful book but a bit of a change in McGarr's focus and modus operandi