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Topic: Derogatory names for foods

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Subject: Derogatory names for foods
Date Posted: 8/29/2008 6:13 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Somehow I got to thinking about some of the derogatory names Americans have for certain foods....you know, like the way many ex-military folks speak of S O S ?  Here at our house we used to have a version of it every once in a while, but we served the creamed chipped beef over a mashed boiled potato and told the children it was "S O S" -- Slop on a Spud.  Then I thought that other contributors to this forum will have funny little anecdotes about food to tell.  I would almost wager that "glop" is a widespread children's word for any melange in which they can't readily identify the component parts.

Plus, don't you wonder, too, if the use of the term "SPAM" for electronic junk mail isn't a source of chagrin for the execs at Hormel Foods?

Date Posted: 8/30/2008 1:56 PM ET
Member Since: 8/14/2008
Posts: 3,574
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When I was a child, we served SOS for breakfast at our house from time to time. I was raised by very plain, down to earth, 'country' grandparents who had survived the depression. Nobody ever bothered to call it SOS, or even to suggest that the children do so. My Aunt and Uncle came every sunday to take us to Church with their family. We had cousins with that Aunt and Uncle the same age as I and the same age as my younger sister. My Uncle was a Decon in the church, they were there everytime the doors open and very involved in the leadership of the church - as a result, my cousins were basicly P.K.s, even though their father was not yet a Minister (when I was 10, they moved away so he could go to seminary). My identical cousin (the one my age, to whom I was attached at the hip) ALWAYS won every memory contast, every sword drill, ect, ect. When I was five, I was sitting right next to my identical cousin in Sunday School, in a circle around our dear Sunday School teacher, and she was asking everyone in turn what they had for breakfast. When it was my turn, I told her. My poor cousin liked to have died. I used to joke that I was going to open a resteraunt called 'S--- for brains', or something else with the word 'S---' in it, and have everything on the menu have the word 'S---' in it, because all of my families favorite foods, when i go home, seem to be of that ilk. The day after thanksgiving I make 'Mac and Cheese and S---'. My Dad always asks me to make him a breakfast of 'Eggs and S---' (a scrabled omellette). Ect, ect. Hey, don't look at me! I don't name these things, i just roll my eyes and cook!
Date Posted: 9/19/2008 12:39 PM ET
Member Since: 9/16/2005
Posts: 463
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Well, not really derogatory terms, but DH has a friend who makes "S---- on toast"  (chipped beef on toast, he's thinking "sh.t on toast", but tells his kids it's "STUFF on toast"). 

I call roast beef, roast beast (DD liked that when she was little, but now that's she's 10, I just get an eyeroll), and raisins are "roaches" in our house (none of us like them). 

Date Posted: 9/21/2008 9:25 AM ET
Member Since: 10/3/2006
Posts: 6,234
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Almost everyone I know calls any flavor of Kool Aid,  -  bug juice.  And I almost swore off meat as a kid when my dad called the Thanksgiving turkey "Roasted Flesh of a Dead Bird"  uh......yummy?

Katz



Last Edited on: 9/21/08 9:27 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 9/26/2008 5:48 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Mountain oysters, anyone?

Sow's belly?

Kibbles (for breakfast cereal)?

"Nigger toes" for Brazil nuts with the skins on?

Ever heard the joke about "moose turd stew" ?

Date Posted: 9/30/2008 9:30 PM ET
Member Since: 8/14/2008
Posts: 3,574
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OMG - I am deathly alleric to Brazils. This was discovered at the age of 11 months, when, according to family (must have been very tramatic, because I don't actually have a memory of it, I reached through my cribe bars and grabbed a Brazil, in its shell, from a nut bowl sitting within my reach for Christmas decoration, and put it to my lips, and immedeatly blew up like the kid in the Oompa - Lompa scene. For realz. I was rushed to the hospital, bright blew and barely breathing, where my 15 year old mother, frantic and afraid, answered the very black nurse who asked her what I had eaten - 'It was a N--- Toe!' My mother grew up so far into BFI (Indiana) I doubt if she knew there was another name for the nut!
Date Posted: 10/1/2008 7:50 AM ET
Member Since: 10/29/2005
Posts: 7,466
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There is a mushroom that grows here that everyone calls puppy peckers.   I am not even sure what the real name is!!

Date Posted: 12/5/2008 10:02 PM ET
Member Since: 6/15/2008
Posts: 340
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In our family, we have a name for the Pistachio/ cool whip/marshmallow salad.  I'm not even sure what the real name of it is but we call it Parrot Poop Salad.

Date Posted: 12/5/2008 11:28 PM ET
Member Since: 8/19/2007
Posts: 1,155
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I call red meat "a blood meal", as if I were a mosquito.  In our family we quote the Coneheads, who were fond of "seared mammal flesh".

Remember how the alien cop in Alien Nation referred to fried eggs as "chicken placentas"?

My mom always called hotdogs "tube steaks" to make dinner sound more fancy.

My friend Paul used to refer to his mom's cooking as "twine beans and loathe loaf" and "chicken tetrachloride"

L. G. (L)
Date Posted: 12/6/2008 2:37 AM ET
Member Since: 9/5/2005
Posts: 12,412
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Paige, were they by any chance stinkhorns?

http://www.dcnature.com/photosfull/Mutinus_caninus.jpg

 

Date Posted: 12/7/2008 1:32 PM ET
Member Since: 10/1/2007
Posts: 2,380
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My best friends Dad used to call vienna sausages 'monkey peckers'

Date Posted: 12/7/2008 2:59 PM ET
Member Since: 7/31/2006
Posts: 14,634
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we used to call chicken fried steak, chicken fried snake...not sure why!

Date Posted: 12/8/2008 7:03 AM ET
Member Since: 9/29/2005
Posts: 3,152
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kiwi fruit = monkey balls

Date Posted: 12/10/2008 6:29 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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One of the grandkids heard me call what I had made for them "Fruit Compote", but as he promptly dubbed it (and got his sisters to follow suit), it is now known at our house as Fruit COMPOST.

Date Posted: 12/10/2008 11:43 PM ET
Member Since: 5/16/2008
Posts: 2,146
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This is the most hilarious thred. I am totally coasting on Ambien time right now, but I will be back to think of some from my childhood. A kid growing up in NJ has GOT to come up with some bizarre stuff. Happy Reading!

Date Posted: 12/13/2008 7:09 AM ET
Member Since: 9/1/2005
Posts: 124
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When my husband was in the marines they refered to chipped beef gravy on toast as "Foreskins on Toast" and "SOS" was a ground beef gravy on toast.  YUMMY!

Date Posted: 12/14/2008 6:37 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Oh, the military is a rich source of names for things served in mess halls!  As lively as college kids' coinings concerning the stuff served in their dining halls!    Who can ever forget "mystery meat", that old standby among school food?  During my time in the USNR, we had to drink "torpedo fluid" . . . in the Comm Center, the coffee was made by the CPO who ran the mimeo machine, and like Navy men with "hash marks" up to his elbow, he liked it S T R O N G . . . .after that time, I have been able to swallow ANY liquid!



Last Edited on: 9/5/11 8:03 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 12/14/2008 6:37 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Another Navy usage was "landing mats" or "landing pads" to refer to pancakes.

I learned about GOOD coffee when I worked on a newspaper in Louisiana, where the Cajuns live.  Translated from the French, they believe that GOOD coffee should be "Black as Night, Strong as Death, Sweet as Love, and Hot as Hell!"

I looked up "slumgullion in a big dictionary the other day, and one definition was "an insipid drink, as weak tea or coffee"  and another was "a meat stew".  There were two more definitions, but one had to do with the processing of a whale aboard ship, and the other with mining.



Last Edited on: 1/10/12 3:06 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 12/16/2008 9:53 PM ET
Member Since: 10/2/2007
Posts: 220
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my grandpa called whipped cream "calf slobber" or "lickdab"

Date Posted: 12/18/2008 4:34 PM ET
Member Since: 11/13/2008
Posts: 6
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SOS was s*^t on shingles when I learned of the recipe for sausage gravy on toast.



Last Edited on: 12/18/08 4:36 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 12/18/2008 8:07 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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It's a small tradition here at my house that the "helpy-selfy" treats table for the winter holidays include a certain kind of tidbit.  It's something I first made when my kids were little, and of course they wanted to know what it was called.   I hadn't thought about a name for the goodies, so on the spur of the moment, I told them "they're winter delicacies."   Well, the kids thought they were "weird" and so the name got changed to "(Winter)Grossities."   Now, years later, guess who makes them for her drop-in guests at holiday time, at her place up North?  My older daughter!  And yes, her friends think they're "weird", too.

To make "grossities", you take a piece of dried fruit (fig, date, prune, or apricot)  flatten it a little, put a gob of cream cheese that has been combined with pineapple or strawberry ice cream topping on it, and finish it off with a nutmeat (pecan, walnut, etc.)  You can vary these, of course, by using  bits of candied fruits, or starting with honey-nut cream cheese, and so forth.

Have a cool Yule, y'all!

 

Date Posted: 12/22/2008 7:29 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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A proposed state tax on sugary soft drinks was the topic of Nicholas Kristof's Op-Ed piece the other day, and in it he remarked he'd "love to see a "Twinkie tax as well."   That made me remember an unusual recipe I ran across, for "Twinkie Pie."    Those of you who read The Sweet Potato Queens' Book of Love, by Jill Conner Brown, will recall it, where its other name, according to Ms Brown, is "White Trash Trifle."

I made the concoction a couple of times, first following the instructions in the book, using Twinkies, pudding, canned fruit pie filling, and Cool Whip.  But the second time I gave it a little "social mobility" and used Lady Fingers, pudding cooked with whole milk, REAL fruit, and whipped cream, not that chemical glop Cool Whip.

(The high school yearbook staff liked it, but I don't think the grandson told them the name of the stuff.)

 

Date Posted: 9/5/2011 8:17 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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It's September again, and this fall, I'm getting cabbage from the garden of my older daughter and from my weekly basket from the local farmer.  I was kind of reviewing the uses for cabbage, and I remembered "Bubble and Squeak".  You know, that British concoction involving leftover meat, potatoes, cabbage, etc.?  It gets its name from the sounds it makes during cooking, I'm told.

An ad for charcoal for grilling had a recipe that amused me-----it was for "Brined Bird Legs with Pop Sop".  One ingredient in the "pop sop" is 12 ounces of cola.

Here in Minnesota, we're having the annual orgy of Deep Fat-fried Food on a Stick----the State Fair.  Today someone texted me that one of the offerings is Key Lime Pie on a Stick!    At this rate, Americans in days to come won't need knives, forks and spoons any longer! And soup already comes in cleverly-designed cups one can sip or swill from . . .  it's a whole new world, ladies.



Last Edited on: 9/14/11 5:55 PM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 11/10/2011 10:51 PM ET
Member Since: 6/9/2007
Posts: 114
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Sweet potatoes refered to as "blow taters" because of they have more gas power than any bean.

 

Date Posted: 11/11/2011 6:08 PM ET
Member Since: 10/17/2006
Posts: 1,427
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Hey, Lynn.......thanks for the tidbit about the "power" of yams, I hadn't ever heard that one.   The mention of beans made me remember the old saying:  "Beans, beans, the musical fruit, The more you eat, the more you toot."

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