Book Reviews of The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11)

The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11)
The Devil Knows You're Dead - Matthew Scudder, Bk 11
Author: Lawrence Block
ISBN-13: 9780380720231
ISBN-10: 038072023X
Publication Date: 10/1/1994
Pages: 384
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 28

3.8 stars, based on 28 ratings
Publisher: Avon
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

10 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 209 more book reviews
Mathew Scudder, the maverick recovering alcoholic detective takes on a truly baffling and dangerous case. Very nice twist at the end.
reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 142 more book reviews
Another in a long line of fantasic Matthew Scudder novels, each one delving farther into the psyche of one of the greatest detectives ever created.
reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 136 more book reviews
Mr Block makes Matthew Scudder a real person. Good reading.
reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 293 more book reviews
Matt Scudder and his friend Elaine, meet the Holtzmann's at a gallery. They like the wife but there is something about the husband that they cannot put their finger on. When he is shot and killed, while making a phone call from a booth, Matt gets involved, and with more than the murder.
reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 517 more book reviews
A Vietnam vet that is mentally challenged is charged with murder. Matthew
scudder must find out if he did it. Very good book
reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 600 more book reviews
Another good entry in the Matthew Scudder series. This one is a lot less hard-core than the previous book A WALK AMONG THE TOMBSTONES, but it is a satisfying read nonetheless. In this one, Scudder tries to clear a Vietnam vet from a murder charge he may not have committed. The vet is a street person with severe mental issues who is charged with shooting an acquaintance of Scudder's who was making a call on a public phone in a somewhat questionable area of town. At first, Scudder feels the vet is guilty but as he digs into the case, he finds the victim definitely has something to hide -- his wife finds a stongbox full of cash in their closet plus it is unknown how the vic was able to pay for a high-priced condo. Along the way, Scudder meets with a dying ex-girl friend who wants him to provide a gun so she can commit suicide if things get too bad, and he has an affair with the wife of the murder victim! At the end, he is still with his ex-hooker girlfriend, Elaine, but his actions in this book make you wonder how long it will last. I guess I need to continue with the series to find out. Overall, I would recommend this one but it does not have the action and it does not include the wacked out psycho-killers of some of the previous books such as TOMBSTONES.
reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 122 more book reviews
Abridged. 2 tapes, 3 hrs
reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 39 more book reviews
Didn't read this one myself - "There are no rules to life, love and death. Those who fly the highest can crash the hardest - like successful yuppie lawyer Glenn Holtzmann, randomely blown away by a deranged derellict at a phone boot."
reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 26 more book reviews
Am enjoying the entire Matthew Scudder series
reviewed The Devil Knows You're Dead (Matthew Scudder, Bk 11) on + 95 more book reviews
From Booklist
There's a new trend afoot in the series mystery. Mickey Spillane, Nero Wolfe, Sherlock Holmes, and their investigating cohorts seldom changed from book to book. Part of their appeal, in fact, was their consistency. Contemporary series authors, however, such as Bill Pronzini, Robert P. Parker, Joseph Hansen, and Lawrence Block, have taken the series character a step further, allowing growth and change to occur to the hard-boiled hero just as they do to ordinary mortals. Block's recovering alcoholic Matt Scudder is a perfect example. Once isolated by guilt, angst, and booze, Scudder was the quintessential loner. Now, as his never-ending recovery continues, his world has begun to expand. He has a true friend in Mick Ballou, a sidekick in street urchin T. J., and a lover in former hooker Elaine. Hired by the brother of a mentally handicapped vet accused of the murder of attorney Glenn Holtzmann, Scudder finds that the victim was both less and more than he appeared to be. Much to his surprise--because he loves Elaine--Scudder becomes involved with Holtzmann's widow. The resolution of the case is a logical surprise that will leave readers contemplating an indifferent universe. Though Scudder's world is as bleak as it's ever been, he's letting a little sun shine through. It's nice to see a friend happy. (Amazon.Com)