Book Reviews of The Devil's Cup: Coffee, the Driving Force in History

The Devil's Cup: Coffee, the Driving Force in History
The Devil's Cup Coffee the Driving Force in History
Author: Stewart Lee Allen
ISBN-13: 9781569471746
ISBN-10: 1569471746
Publication Date: 10/1999
Pages: 231
Rating:
  • Currently 2.7/5 Stars.
 3

2.7 stars, based on 3 ratings
Publisher: Soho Press
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Devil's Cup: Coffee, the Driving Force in History on + 5 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Part travelogue, part philosophical musing about coffee and its effect on society.
reviewed The Devil's Cup: Coffee, the Driving Force in History on + 14 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Follows the author on his quest to discover the roots and influences of coffee on civilization. Found the author's often dangerous travails into communities wrought with civil war and dangerous occupations all on a quest for a single cup of coffee to continue his "research" to be, not exciting, as I'm sure he feels it is-- but simply cocky and needlessly reckless. The author, after all, comes across not as a writer utterly devoted to the exploration of his subject, but a hapless thrill-seeker who flaunts his repeated attempts to endanger himself. The writing is mediocre, at best, and the history of "coffee" as he presents is not truly organized in a logical or linear fashion and is based instead around the authors timetable and travels. Consequently, the "history" must be weeded out from the self-serving auto-biographical horn-tooting he is doing through most of it. If you are looking for a good historically documented work in this book, I'd look elsewhere.
reviewed The Devil's Cup: Coffee, the Driving Force in History on + 297 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Overall a very interesting story of someone following the path that coffee might have taken to get to modern society, full of lots of tidbits of history and trivia. The writing is a bit uneven and the author is not particularly likeable, but that can get him into some interesting scrapes in parts of the world that not too many people would dare go visit. (Does that make him brave or just stupid? I'm not really sure, but it makes for good reading.)