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Topic: Diana Palmer Favorites?

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Subject: Diana Palmer Favorites?
Date Posted: 10/27/2009 6:02 PM ET
Member Since: 3/29/2009
Posts: 196
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I just picked up 37 Diana Palmer books, and was hoping someone would tell me some favorites.

I've only read After Midnight and Before Sunrise.  Any suggestions on what I can start tonight?

 

 

Thanks!

Date Posted: 10/27/2009 6:04 PM ET
Member Since: 5/14/2009
Posts: 6,852
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Lawless and Despardo are my favorite. 

 

Date Posted: 10/27/2009 6:28 PM ET
Member Since: 2/3/2009
Posts: 4,591
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Colleen, this one's all you, girl! lol

Date Posted: 10/27/2009 7:19 PM ET
Member Since: 4/25/2007
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After Midnight and Before Sunrise are two of my favorites!  Lawless and Desperado too.  Oh, and The Texas Ranger.  Lord of the Desert, Once In Paris, Paper Rose.  The whole mercenery series.  Oh, the Most Wanted books.

Okay, I like them all.  Put them in order by publication date and dig in.  So many of her characters appear in lots of her books so if you can read them in publication order, that's good.

Oh, Colratin's Proposal!  Love that one.

Date Posted: 10/27/2009 8:48 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 808
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LOL, Gina. Speaking of DP, I just got 2 more in the mail today. So of the 140 stories she has published (125 as DP, 8 as Susan Kyle, 7 as Diana Blayne, and 1 as Katy Currie), I've now got 120 of them. Whew!

KG - I agree with everyone else here about reading them in publication order, but... so many of her books have been re-issued that the publication information is not always the best indicator of the original chronology. Yeah, I know they're supposed to show both the original pub date and the pub date for the re-issue, but they don't always do that.

To add to the confusion, Palmer didn't finish one series before starting another. Like Stephanie Laurens, books in one series have been published alternately with books in another series. For Palmer, I use the term "series" loosely. Most of her books are not officially designated as parts of series, but the stories are related through characters and locations (most notably the fictional Jacobsville TX).

I've glanced over the series list on DP's website and not only has it not been updated since 2007, it doesn't mention one group of very popular books, the related stories that have been unofficially dubbed the "Hutton & Co." series.

I recommend using the author series list at fictiondb.com to see a fairly complete list of stories in chronological order and what is related to what.

Don't worry if there are you're missing books in a sequence. DP's "series" books just include secondary characters in common. So when you see someone's name, you "know" that person and their story. You won't get confused by any gaps.

BTW, bit of trivia, After Midnight was originally published under the name Susan Kyle (DP's real name) and the related story, Before Sunrise, wasn't published until 12 years later under her DP pseudonym. And a bit character in Before Sunrise, Alice Jones (the medical examiner), who also pops up in a few other recent stories is finally going to be the heroine. When The Maverick is released in December, Alice gets paired up with Harley Fowler. Harley was introduced in The Winter Soldier as a merc wanna-be. Both are very funny characters so I think that one's gonna be a hoot!

Lastly, KG, not every title requires it, but stock up on kleenex! Then find your most comfortable reading spot, grab your favorite afghan, and have a ball!

Colleen

Date Posted: 10/27/2009 9:06 PM ET
Member Since: 5/14/2009
Posts: 6,852
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LOL - Colleen - where were you when I started reading DP?   I thought I was the only one that cried!  Now I feel better.   I can't wait for the Maverick that is one that I will probably buy at the store and not wait in line. 

Date Posted: 10/27/2009 10:01 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
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Robin - Are you kidding? When I need to have a good cry for stress release, I grab Regan's Pride.

I've only been collecting/reading DP for about 2 years now. My sister gave me a nearly complete collection about 4 years ago, but mixed in with about 3,000 other romance novels (mostly Silhouettes). Her intent was that I should sell them on eBay, which I did. I shipped all the DP's to a reader in Britain. Ugh! I sold a first edition of Nora Roberts' first book (Irish Thoroughbred) for 75 cents! Double ugh!

But I hate shopping online for books. I wanna be able to read the synopses and too many sellers/websites don't offer any information. So, as a seller, I thought I could provide the info that I, as a buyer, would want to find. I started typing synopses and listing the h/h names in my listings. Came across a book where the hero's name was not mentioned in the synopsis, so I had to start reading. That book was Savage Fire by Phoebe Conn. I immediately started being more discriminating about what I sold and now my keeper shelf rivals my inventory. LOL

I started collecting DP again but would never have acquired so many without PBS. Right now, the whole collection is on loan to my sister. She's tired of paranormals and regencies and wants to read DP again. '-D

BTW, ditto on Maverick. I'll be buying it. Fortunately, it's a Silhouette Desire title so it's a fairly cheap date.

Colleen

Date Posted: 10/27/2009 10:32 PM ET
Member Since: 5/14/2009
Posts: 6,852
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I am impressed and thank you for adding a synopis - it drives me crazy and sometimes I can't remember if I read the book, but I will remember the synopiss.  I do the same thing, when I know I need a cry and can't get there I pick up a DP - for me it is Lawless. 

Ouch on selling the first edition and the DP collection.

Date Posted: 10/28/2009 8:37 AM ET
Member Since: 1/23/2009
Posts: 468
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So far my favorites are Lawless and Magnolia.

Date Posted: 10/28/2009 9:30 AM ET
Member Since: 8/21/2005
Posts: 989
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But, Colleen, we want to know which of DP's book titles are your favorites?? I'm looking for recommendations too, i've read a few of hers but probably not more than 10 of them.

Date Posted: 10/28/2009 9:40 AM ET
Member Since: 8/23/2007
Posts: 26,510
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I've read her books all out of order and had no problems.  I've liked them all. She's a guilty pleasure for me.  A lot of people bash her books-but I love them. Probably because when I sit down to read a Diana Palmer I know just what I'm going to get.

I also like that she doesn't seem to have jumped on the paranormal band wagon like just about every other author.

I liked Paper Rose, Outsider, Lacy, Once In Paris, Desperado, Trilby, Before Sunrise-I know I've read more but I'm blanking on the titles right now.



Last Edited on: 10/28/09 9:46 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 10/28/2009 11:51 AM ET
Member Since: 6/21/2008
Posts: 6,542
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Colleen, 

When I think of the hundreds of books that I have given away!  Most are on wish lists here.  I could really get down about it, but what good would that do!
 I had a complete first edition collection of Kathleen Woodwiss (sp) that I gave to a second hand store for $5.00 once.   And that is just one author!  Oh, my.

Pamela

Date Posted: 10/28/2009 5:48 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 808
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Tanya - my fave DPs? To Love and Cherish, Sutton's Way (early LTT, recently re-issued in the HC duology, The Winter Man), Regan's Pride, Nora (historical), The Last Mercenary, and Lawless are my 5-star DPs. But I've yet to read a DP I didn't like.

Mary - She does write sci-fi romance. The Morcai Battalion was originally published under Susan Kyle. The sequel, The Recruit, was published last year under DP pseudonym. As for DP being a guilty pleasure? No guilt here. Well no more than I have with a big ol' bag of Dove Promises. I know what to expect, but darn if they don't still taste good.

FOR ALL LOOKING TO ACQUIRE THOSE TOO NUMEROUS DP TITLES - Look for duologies and anthologies! Get 2 or 3 stories for the price of 1! If you check the book title at fictiondb.com, you'll see all the publication dates, including any anthologized re-issues. DP first wrote stories for McFadden Romance. Those 9 stories were re-issued by Silhouette a few years ago, but they also re-issued them in 6 "Duets" (including some early Silhouette stories to make 12 in all).

There is one DP story that is beyond HTF: At Winter's End was published in 1981. It's the Holy Grail of DP books and extremely valuable. She gave the rights to her son with the understanding that it was not to be reprinted in her lifetime, so it has never been re-issued. She says that Now and Forever is the same story but rewritten to be much better. So if you're collecting DP, your collection is complete without that title.

Wanna talk DP? There's a bulletin board on her website populated with serious DP junkies.

Colleen

Date Posted: 10/29/2009 7:35 AM ET
Member Since: 8/23/2007
Posts: 26,510
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I forgot that she was also Susan Kyle.

Date Posted: 10/29/2009 10:25 AM ET
Member Since: 2/24/2006
Posts: 5,498
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Lawless is my favorite

Date Posted: 10/29/2009 12:05 PM ET
Member Since: 8/21/2005
Posts: 989
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What about "Heart of Winter"??? Has anyone read this and really enjoyed it??

I think it's 2 stories in 1 book. The reason i'm asking is now that i have read this thread i've got the itch to read another DP book. Heart of Winter is available at our local library, just wondering if it's worth the read?

Date Posted: 10/29/2009 1:20 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 808
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Tanya, Heart of Winter is actually a duology re-issue of If Winter Comes (McFadden Romance 1981) and Woman Hater (Silhouette Romance 1987). I thought both stories were okay, but not the first books I'd grab off the shelf to scratch a DP itch. Since you're getting it from the library, I'd go for it. They are worth a lazy afternoon's time.

Colleen

Date Posted: 10/29/2009 11:54 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 2,937
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With all the wonderful reviews and fans, why do so many people hate her? I've never read and wonder what the love/hate thing is all about.

Subject: Diana Palmer Fav's
Date Posted: 10/30/2009 12:58 AM ET
Member Since: 10/16/2009
Posts: 2
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I just lover DP, some of my favorites are Boss Man, Men of the West (Harden, Evan and Donovan), Christmas Cowboy, The Cowboy and the Lady, Iron Cowboy, Sweet Enemy.

I love having to use kleenex when I read her books, it's a great release.

Date Posted: 10/30/2009 4:41 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
Posts: 808
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Jenny - As Palmer herself states in her foreword in the Duets reprints of her early books, sex was taboo in mainstream romance novels when she first started writing books. Sexual tension was built through emotion and dialog and a kiss was a really big deal. (I paraphrase - my books are all visiting my sister right now).

Her more recent standalone titles lean toward romantic suspense, but classic Diana Palmer (particularly all those Long, Tall Texans and others published under the Silhouette Romance and Desire labels), are fairly consistent in characters and conflicts.

Her heroes are caustic alpha males whose lives have been altered by one relationship/event. He's unable/unwilling to trust women and he's not a very social creature. He's not promiscuous rakes but may date lots of beautiful tall thin models/socialites, though he doesn't sleep with them. He tends to be in his mid-30s.

Meanwhile, the heroine is someone the hero knows. He's her guardian, her neighbor, her boss, his sister's best friend, his brother's friend, his cousin's widow or ex-girlfriend, etc. Typically, she's younger. Much younger. She's 19-22 years old and "green as grass." She has little or no experience with men. Almost always a virgin though the hero cannot fathom that in contemporary America. She secretly carries a torch for the hero, but pride compels her to keep her feelings hidden.

The tension comes when he realizes he is attracted to this much younger woman but doesn't want to be. He doesn't know how to and doesn't want to show his feelings for her. He's like the boy on the playground who punches a girl in the arm because he likes her. No, he's never physically abusive, but he is verbally abusive. He convinces himself that she's not really as nice and as special as she seems and treats her like gum on the bottom of his shoe. Of course, rather than backing down and being reduced to tears by the big brute, our intrepid virgin fights back. The more fiery her temper, the more fiery his desire for her.

The plots do vary. But Palmer's formula for characters is, for the most part, fairly constant. A lot of readers don't like her because of the predictability. A lot of readers do like her because of the predictability. Like I've said, she's like chocolate. You know what to expect. But that doesn't make it any less enjoyable each time you indulge.

For a nice Diana Palmer sampler, I recommend:

Sutton's Way - He's a virgin with a 13-yr-old son. He's very conservative, hates women and our contemporary society's liberal attitudes about sex. She's a lead singer in a rock band, but also a virgin. She's on retreat in a neighboring cabin borrowed from her aunt's lover, a man with a bad reputation. (This one is currently available. It's the 2nd story in The Winter Man duology that was just released.)

Regan's Pride - She's his cousin's widow and he blames her for the man's death. But when the terms of the will leave her impoverished except for a small trust administered by our hero, he offers her a home until she can get on her feet. I'm not going to give away any more, but this definitely requires a big box of kleenex.

The Last Mercenary - This story includes a touch of Palmer's recent bent for romantic suspense. He's a mercenary living in the Bahamas who helped federal agents bring down a drug lord. She's his stepsister, living in hometown Jacobsville, caring for his aging father. For revenge, she's kidnapped by the drug cartel. He and his team rescue her and now, he intends to keep her safe and close to him forever.

Lawless - He's a Texas Ranger. She's his wife and partner. Huh?!? Her father and her hero were ranching partners. When she was 16, her father beat her badly and hero sent him to prison. To protect her interest in the ranch, he married her (paper marriage), intending to get the marriage annulled when she turns 21. As her 21st birthday approaches, a criminal bent on revenge is threatening the ranch at the same time they rent their ranch to a movie crew as a location. But when she takes a bullet for him, he's having to rethink that annulment thing... Another one that needs kleenex.

WARNING - Diana Palmer books may be addictive. If you like her, you love her. Can't get enough of them. Good thing she's written so darn many.

Colleen

Date Posted: 10/30/2009 6:35 AM ET
Member Since: 12/7/2005
Posts: 1,002
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My favorites are:

Friends and Lovers - love the scene where the heroine dumps spaghetti on him.

The Patient Nurse - The ultimate wronged heroine

Matt Caldwell:Texas Tycoon - A very satisfactory grovel

Carrera's Bride - A hero who quilts, have to love that

 

Date Posted: 10/30/2009 7:36 AM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
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Bronwyn - I don't remember that scene from Friends and Lovers. I do remember the scene in Paper Rose where she dumps crab bisque on the hero. And didn't he deserve it!

The Patient Nurse was very good. Did you catch the small tie-in to the Long, Tall Texans? He listens to Desperado in surgery. Desperado's lead singer is the heroine in Sutton's Way, the band leader is the hero in Redbird. Redbird has been published in the Abductions & Seductions antho, Lone Star Christmas antho, but look for the Lone Star Christmas and Other Gifts antho - ISBN 9780373483860. You'll get Redbird and Christmas Cowboy (Corrigan Hart's story).

Colleen

Date Posted: 10/30/2009 2:32 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
Posts: 2,937
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Thanks Colleen. I knew you'd be a good person to ask. I thought the objections were going to be like Cheryl Holt objections - really mean and really smutty.

Now I'm a little afraid to try them because I love to cry. I do like reading a good smutty novel but maybe the subtlety (hmm...spell check?) would be good for me.

Date Posted: 10/30/2009 2:49 PM ET
Member Since: 5/3/2006
Posts: 6,436
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With all the wonderful reviews and fans, why do so many people hate her? I've never read and wonder what the love/hate thing is all about.

The love part would be the tension and heartache that she builds up.  The hate part probably varies from person to person. For me, it's a mix of a lot of stuff. The careless, error- and repetition-filled writing drives me nuts.  (More of an issue in her later books.) The simplistic way she sometimes writes, telling huge pieces of the characters' back history without showing them, drives me nuts.  The way all the characters/conflicts are the same... drives me nuts, though it does have the advantage of knowing what you're getting. And perhaps most of all, the way she makes her heroines ever more incredibly abused and downtrodden so as to make the hero feel even more guilt-ridden and anguished (again, more of an issue in the later books) offends me. It's so unsubtle and masochistic.

Date Posted: 10/30/2009 4:26 PM ET
Member Since: 6/20/2007
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Willa - I'd have to agree with you about the characters' back history. The one that immediately comes to mind is Winter Roses. Ivy and Merry are best friends. Have been for years. So why after all these years of being twin sisters of different mothers are they having this conversation about Merry's family history?

But then, there's a similar scene in one of my favorite movies and it drives me nuts! In The American President, where President Andrew Shepherd (aka Michael Douglas) tells his chief-of-staff/best friend A.J. (aka Martin Sheen) to call him by his first name when they're alone. They're having this conversation after he's been in office for 3 years? Huh?

I think I'd rather get backstory in narrative than in dialog. And yeah, for my money, DP could omit local history and archaeology altogether. TMI.

Colleen

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