Book Reviews of The Dim Sum of All Things

The Dim Sum of All Things
The Dim Sum of All Things
Author: Kim Wong Keltner
ISBN-13: 9780060560751
ISBN-10: 0060560754
Publication Date: 1/2004
Pages: 352
Rating:
  • Currently 3.4/5 Stars.
 67

3.4 stars, based on 67 ratings
Publisher: Avon Trade
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

19 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 373 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 7
A quick, happy, funny, fun read - Amy Tan lite. A total chick book. I learned a lot about Chinese culture, though, and was impressed toward the end with the author's descriptions of China and Chinese customs.

I held my stomach laughing at some of the situations Lindsey (the main character) gets herself into. Poor girl has the world's worst date. Hands down.
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 371 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
An interesting story about a Chinese-American woman caught between her heritage and her attraction to a "white devil" as her family refers to all Caucasian men.
I really enjoyed this book but disagree with those who call it chick-lit. It had its funny moments, but the seriousness of Lindsey's search for her Chinese roots seemed to me the main theme of the story, not her search for romance.
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 367 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
I enjoyed this book. It made me laugh out-loud at some of the absurdities of our given cultures. I could relate to Lindsey (the main character). I'm Italian and I find it comical when people think are confused because I don't speak like Rocky Balboa (Yo, Adrian!) and I don't have mob connections. Maybe I should just lie! Are we really like our stereotypes? Kim Wong Keltner pokes fun at her culture and at people who think all Asian little girls should like Hello Kitty.
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Helpful Score: 2
An irreverant, tounge-in-cheek, funny look at a "twinkie" (Her words, not mine) who is Asian on the outside - but, Caucasian princess on the inside coming to grips with her own ethnicity. NOT an angst-filled journey - but, rather, a story related in a laugh-out-loud funny account of one person's journey.

The book offered many so-true stereotypes that I recognized - most especially the "hoarders-of-all-things-Asian" the non-Asian men who had a better knowledge (and appreciation) of Asian culture than the author - but a propensity for collecting Asian
friends/girlfriends etc. Then further explores her realization that while "hoarders" do exist, not all non-Asians with Asian friends are necessarily hoarders.

I am very glad that I read this book - I laughed a lot, and I learned a lot.
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 297 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
A very cute book about a girl growing up in San Francisco, coming to terms with being American Born Chinese and the balancing act that entails, learning about her family's history through her grandmother, and getting to know and like a guy from work, despite his "Hoarder" characteristics. "Will Lindsay realize that the path to true love lies somewhere between the dim sum and the pepperoni pizza?"
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 120 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Let's just say that as a female ABC (american-born Chinese) this book hit really close to home. With the exception of localities, I was amused to find the protagonist, Lindsey, could very well be my identical clone, right down to the age. This book contains lots of "asian-centric" references that unfortunately, you have to be Asian to really understand. The jokes do start to wear thin, though, and if it was starting to annoy me, then I wonder how annoyed a non-Chinese reader would feel. Still, I did like Lindsey and especially the fact her love for family still came through despite all the eye-rolling bits about Asian culture. This was definitely chick lit/light reading.
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 38 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
At twenty-five, Lindsay is not the best representation of a Chinese-American career girl. She lives rent-free with Pau Pau (her grandmother) while working as a closeted meat-eater for a Vegan lifestyle magazine.

Lindsay's story reads a lot like a teen girl's blog: she complains about white boys (Hoarders) who only want to date Asian women, yet she crushes maniacally on Michael, a white guy in her workplace.

The book vascillates from interesting historical tidbits about Chinese culture and pop culture to Lindsay's cringe-worthy life in San Francisco.

I never did find out why Asians love Hello Kitty.
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 84 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
The Dim Sum of All Things was to say the least an educational read. It took me quite awhile to even like the book. At first I really disliked it because race played a major part and it made me uncomfortable. Where I live, there isn't much diversity, so I haven't been exposed to the way things can be. (Yes I realize that makes me sound really naive.) Overall, it was a really good read and I have the sequel "Buddha Baby" on my to be read shelf.
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 410 more book reviews
This is an absolutely hilarious book dealing with the search for romance of an Americanized Asian woman.
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Chinese American coming of age story. Very cute, like Hello Kitty!
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This book is a fun little romp with a Lindsey Owyang, a Chinese American girl who grew up in SF Chinatown. She suffers the trial and tribulation (and joys) of work, dating white guys, Asian guys, friends, family, and city life. If you are interested in Asian culture it is a fun read, you get to see the main character's perspective on life and her own conflicts with her heritage and fitting in with her Chinese kin while really feeling like a typical white girl on the inside. Dim Sum of all things is amusing most of the time and sometimes touching as well.

I actually read the second book 'Buddha Baby' before I found this book and I still think I liked the second book more than the first one. I would recommend that as a great read even if you never read Dim Sum.
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 3 more book reviews
Very cute book, makes you appreciate and think about your own heritage.
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Very amusing story set in San Francisco Chinatown.
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This book is ostensibly about Lindsey's (an ABC = American-born Chinese) inner journey from her trying to fit into American culture to finally accepting her heritage. Too bad that she comes across as a spoiled Chinese "princess". For the most part the book sounds like the diary of an adolescent girl's crush on a "white devil". The book is full of stereotypes. Given Lindsey's behaviour, it is rather inexplicable why her object of desire is attracted to her. The writing sounds rather immature, and dialogs are often stilted, with many non-sequiturs.

The only parts of the book where the writing improves is towards the end when the author describes her trip to China and a drive through the San Francisco Bay Area countryside - both of which help Lindsey come to terms with her Chinese roots. Unfortunately, and contrary to what you would expect from the questions on the book's back cover, it is not very amusing at all, because it is too contrived.
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on
cute book, enjoyed it
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 29 more book reviews
Very good book!!!
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 83 more book reviews
ave you ever wondered:

* Why Asians love "Hello Kitty"?

* What the tattooed Chinese characters really say?

* How to achieve feng shui for optimum make-out sessions?

* Where Asian cuties meet the white guys who love them?

Then you'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll realize this book is better than a Broadway production of Cats when you read scenes that include:

* twenty-something Lindsey Owyang mastering the intricacies of office voicemail and fax dialing

* an authentic Chinese banquet where Number One Son shows off his language skills by speaking "Chinglish"

* dating disasters with grandsons of Grandma's mahjong partners

* the discovery that the real China looks nothing like the pavilion at Disney World

* karaoke

And all the while Lindsey is falling in lust with the "white devil" in her politically correct office. But will Grandma's stinky Chinese ointments send him running? Or will Lindsey realize that the path to true love lies somewhere between the dim sum and the pepperoni pizza?
reviewed The Dim Sum of All Things on + 40 more book reviews
More chick lit
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new condition never read