Book Reviews of The Dreamkeepers : Successful Teachers of African American Children

The Dreamkeepers : Successful Teachers of African American Children
The Dreamkeepers Successful Teachers of African American Children
Author: Gloria Ladson-Billings
ISBN-13: 9780787903381
ISBN-10: 0787903388
Publication Date: 1/29/1997
Pages: 208
Rating:
  • Currently 4.3/5 Stars.
 6

4.3 stars, based on 6 ratings
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Book Type: Paperback
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2 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Dreamkeepers : Successful Teachers of African American Children on + 22 more book reviews
Although statistics paint a harsh picture of the education of African American children, Ladson-Billings (curriculum and instruction, Univ. of Wisconsin) integrates scholarly research with stories of eight successful teachers in a predominantly African American school district to illustrate that the "dream" of all teachers and parents-academic success for all children-is alive and can be emulated. The presentation of examples from "intellectually rigorous and challenging classrooms" emphasizes the cultural and social aspects of the issues in education as a whole. The author's own experiences as a student and teacher of teachers support the need to make the problems of African American children a central issue in any debate on the American educational system. The in-depth bibliographical notes and the excellent appendixes discussing the methodology and the context of the study should be useful for education students and the libraries serving them.
reviewed The Dreamkeepers : Successful Teachers of African American Children on + 9 more book reviews
Dreamkeepers is a groundbreaking and inspirational book that just might make you want to become a teacher. Ladson-Billings presents the stories of eight teachers, both black and white, in predominantly black school districts who have managed to do what the American public school system as a whole has failed miserably at: teaching African-American students in a way that engages them and helps them learn (and WANT to learn) by playing to their strengths and experiences.