Book Reviews of Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us (Audio CD) (Unabridged)

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us (Audio CD) (Unabridged)
Drive The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us - Audio CD - Unabridged
Author: Daniel H. Pink
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ISBN-13: 9780143145080
ISBN-10: 0143145088
Publication Date: 1/21/2010
Edition: Unabridged
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 3

4.2 stars, based on 3 ratings
Publisher: Penguin Audio
Book Type: Audio CD
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

2 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us (Audio CD) (Unabridged) on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I have been listening to this audio book, and like it very much. It outlines a new paradigm for motivation that makes much more sense to me than what I was taught in Psychology classes a decade ago. Pink makes the case for intrinsic motivation, for mastery, flow, and autonomy as 21st century workforce necessities, with examples from various companies that are applying the principles.

I read this book because I teach high school math and science at an alternative school to unmotivated students. I see how the "carrot and stick" approach of using extrinsic rewards as motivators earlier in their school career has ruined their intrinsic motivation. I think I can apply some of the principles of this book to my classroom to improve motivation.

I found out about "Drive" from a publication aimed at principals, reviewing it as a resource for reform of the educational system. In my opinion, that can't come soon enough!
reviewed Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us (Audio CD) (Unabridged) on + 76 more book reviews
Pink presents very interesting research done in the field of psychology that may change the way business and schools attempt to motivate. The main message is that we underestimate the human desire to be great and our desire to be excellent. Let people be great, you do not have to bribe them with money. It is worth a read.