Book Reviews of Early Sunday Morning: The Pearl Harbor Diary of Amber Billows, Hawaii, 1941 (Dear America)

Early Sunday Morning: The Pearl Harbor Diary of Amber Billows, Hawaii, 1941 (Dear America)
Early Sunday Morning The Pearl Harbor Diary of Amber Billows Hawaii 1941 - Dear America
Author: Barry Denenberg
ISBN-13: 9780439328746
ISBN-10: 0439328748
Publication Date: 10/1/2001
Pages: 156
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 4.2/5 Stars.
 39

4.2 stars, based on 39 ratings
Publisher: Scholastic Inc.
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

3 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Early Sunday Morning: The Pearl Harbor Diary of Amber Billows, Hawaii, 1941 (Dear America) on + 205 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
This is another wonderful book from the Dear America series regarding Pearl Harbor. This fictional character came to Hawaii because her father's paper sent him to live and write articles. It gives a wonderful account of the happenings of the time using real accounts in history.
reviewed Early Sunday Morning: The Pearl Harbor Diary of Amber Billows, Hawaii, 1941 (Dear America) on + 2513 more book reviews
Pearl Harbor, on the Island of O'ahu, Hawaii, was attacked by the Japanese Imperial Navy at approximately 8:00 A.M., Sunday morning, December 7, 1941. The surprise attack involved a striking force of 353 Japanese aircraft. Nineteen U.S. ships, including five battleships, and about 150 U.S planes were destroyed; more than 2,300 soldiers, sailors and civilians were killed. President Roosevelt declared that it was "a day that will live in infamy." On December 8, Congress declared a state of war with Japan; three days later Germany and Italy declared was on the United States.

Great historical novel. Great gift book!
reviewed Early Sunday Morning: The Pearl Harbor Diary of Amber Billows, Hawaii, 1941 (Dear America) on + 201 more book reviews
Amber is about 12, and her family relocates to Hawaii because her journalist father is sent by his newspaper. In her new school, Amber's best friend is Japanese, but among the American sailors stationed there, there is lots of anti-Japanese, anti-Buddhist prejudice. After the bombing, Amber's mother, a trained nurse, volunteers at school turned hospital, and Amber goes along to help. Blackouts, bomb shelters, victory gardens, and relocation of the Japanese (among them her friend)to isolation camps in the U.S. are all part of the story. Not outstanding, but a good fictional introduction to a part of American history. For school-aged children.