Book Reviews of Ever

Ever
Ever
Author: Gail Carson Levine
ISBN-13: 9780061229626
ISBN-10: 0061229628
Publication Date: 5/1/2008
Pages: 256
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 2.8/5 Stars.
 40

2.8 stars, based on 40 ratings
Publisher: HarperCollins
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

10 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Ever on + 30 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
I was able to read this book before it was published through the publisher's FirstLook program. Good thing I did because I would have been furious to have wasted money on it.

I had high hopes for 'Ever'. The story sounded great and I was even more excited when I realized it was written by the author of 'Ella Enchanted', one of my favorite stories ever. For all my high hopes, I was let down very hard. I could still enjoy the story but the way it was written felt like a rough draft or an outline. I wanted to return it to the author and say, "This is a good start. Now let's give it some depth and character". Truly, it felt like bare bones. I wanted to see some muscles and flesh. A promising story and characters but both needed more life and details.
reviewed Ever on + 42 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
What a disappointment this one was....I disliked it so much I don't really want to even write a review. It took me almost 2 weeks to read this Young Adult book.

It was shallow and unbelievable. Shallow because there was no real character or story development, when things looked like they were going somewhere the author would drop it and move onto the next scene. Unbelievable, because even a sixteen year old girl takes at least a few days to fall head over heals in love. Especially one that would be distracted by the fact that she is going to be sacrificed.
reviewed Ever on
Helpful Score: 3
Interesting look at theology/mythology...but in the end, "Ever" falls flat. The book is too short for any real character development...and the every other chapter character viewpoint change doesn't help. It doesn't break up the story too badly, but some "chapters" consist of only a few paragraphs...not enough to get the feel of a character. Both Kezi and Olus are very two dimensional and have a relationship that I wanted to buy into so badly but couldn't. Is the message that you should search forever for a God that isn't there? Maybe it's unfair to review as an adult, as this is really a young adult title...but shallow writing is shallow writing. It's not bad for a kid wanting something that reads quickly and is sort of romantic...I just think with this author I expected more.
reviewed Ever on + 30 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
I was able to read this book before it was published through the publisher's FirstLook program. Good thing I did because I would have been furious to have wasted money on it.

I had high hopes for 'Ever'. The story sounded great and I was even more excited when I realized it was written by the author of 'Ella Enchanted', one of my favorite stories ever. For all my high hopes, I was let down very hard. I could still enjoy the story but the way it was written felt like a rough draft or an outline. I wanted to return it to the author and say, "This is a good start. Now let's give it some depth and character". Truly, it felt like bare bones. I wanted to see some muscles and flesh. A promising story and characters but both needed more life and details.
reviewed Ever on
Stopped reading after the 1st chapter. Too boring. I don't know how a teen could possibly be interested enough to read this.
reviewed Ever on + 270 more book reviews
This is not my favorite book of the authors. The characters didn't engage me at all. I realize that I am an adult reading this, so maybe the target audience would like it better.
reviewed Ever on + 11 more book reviews
I was so disappointed by this book. I almost can't believe it was written by Gail Carson Levine. The characters are somewhat flat, and the whole story just moves too quickly to really get into. Kezi and Olus fell in love WAY too quickly, which made it very difficult to take them seriously as a couple who was planning to stay together forever. They barely knew each other, and yet they kept spouting all this stuff about eternal love and loyalty. I didn't know whether to laugh in derision or start sobbing at just how awful it was.

As if that weren't enough, the plot is often very disjointed and just doesn't really flow at all. There were a lot of things left as mysteries, and not in a good way. I kept waiting for the story to become more fleshed out, but it just never happened, which made it feel very shallow. I was also left very unsatisfied by the ending.

***HERE BE SPOILERS***

The book ends with Kezi having turned into an immortal goddess to join Olus and the other gods on their magical mountain in the sky. (This in itself was disturbing, that she was so ready to let people worship her.) She lets her family continue to believe that she is dead, seemingly without a care for how they feel about it, ALTHOUGH SHE COULD GO TALK TO THEM ANYTIME SHE WANTED TO. Instead she stays with the boy/god she had known for less than half a year. Personally I just can't stand that, and it left me with very little respect or liking for the character.

***END SPOILERS***


TL;DR: Don't waste your time. If you're looking for a really good story by this author, go for Ella Enchanted, Fairest, or Two Princesses of Bamarre.
reviewed Ever on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Lynn Crow for TeensReadToo.com

Olus, the young god of the wind, prefers to live with humans rather than his divine companions, all of whom are hundreds of years older than he is. In his travels he can't help noticing and falling in love with the beautiful and talented Kezi. At first he forces himself to be content merely watching, but then Kezi's father makes a deadly oath, and Kezi has only a month left to live. Unwilling to let her die, Olus reveals himself and offers Kezi a chance at life.

But before Olus and Kezi can defy fate and make a new life for her, they must survive the most frightening tests of their lives -- alone. Can they prove themselves worthy in the gods' eyes, and their own?

EVER is a touching novel about the power of love in overcoming fear, and the many different types of faith. The myth-like story takes place in a unique setting, more like India than the traditional medieval backdrop of most fantasies, and which makes for a fascinating world to explore. Olus and Kezi make for sympathetic narrators, passionate but wiser than their years would suggest.

Readers may wish that their adventures lasted longer. What adventure there is will have them turning the pages, eager to find out whether Kezi will survive, and what she may have to give up in the process. An excellent novel for older children and teens, especially those interested in other cultures and questions of faith.
reviewed Ever on + 57 more book reviews
I stopped reading after chapter 3. I have read my share of dark fantasy novels but this book gave me the creeps.
reviewed Ever on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Lynn Crow for TeensReadToo.com

Olus, the young god of the wind, prefers to live with humans rather than his divine companions, all of whom are hundreds of years older than he is. In his travels he can't help noticing and falling in love with the beautiful and talented Kezi. At first he forces himself to be content merely watching, but then Kezi's father makes a deadly oath, and Kezi has only a month left to live. Unwilling to let her die, Olus reveals himself and offers Kezi a chance at life.

But before Olus and Kezi can defy fate and make a new life for her, they must survive the most frightening tests of their lives -- alone. Can they prove themselves worthy in the gods' eyes, and their own?

EVER is a touching novel about the power of love in overcoming fear, and the many different types of faith. The myth-like story takes place in a unique setting, more like India than the traditional medieval backdrop of most fantasies, and which makes for a fascinating world to explore. Olus and Kezi make for sympathetic narrators, passionate but wiser than their years would suggest.

Readers may wish that their adventures lasted longer. What adventure there is will have them turning the pages, eager to find out whether Kezi will survive, and what she may have to give up in the process. An excellent novel for older children and teens, especially those interested in other cultures and questions of faith.