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Topic: So............has everyone heard about PG's new YA series?

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Subject: So............has everyone heard about PG's new YA series?
Date Posted: 3/20/2012 5:15 PM ET
Member Since: 7/15/2008
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Changeling

Excerpt here. See how far the rest of you get crying

 

Date Posted: 3/20/2012 6:23 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2009
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There is a lot of money in the teen market.

I didn't get very far.  I know that PG is very popular.  But she is like nails on a blackboard to me, I just can't read her and be objective.



Last Edited on: 3/20/12 6:51 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 3/20/2012 7:20 PM ET
Member Since: 1/12/2008
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Get 'em hooked young, I suppose.....

Date Posted: 3/20/2012 8:00 PM ET
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Everything she is putting on the market seems to be driven towards financial gain with no concern about quality. I read her Tudor books a few years ago when I first started in the HF genre, but The Boleyn Inheritance was the last one I'd give a thumbs up to, they've gone steadily downhill from there.

Date Posted: 3/20/2012 9:23 PM ET
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It's like pop music.  Not much substance but a catchy hook.

Date Posted: 3/20/2012 10:21 PM ET
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g47K7V7Ub6w  cheeky

Date Posted: 3/20/2012 11:42 PM ET
Member Since: 1/24/2009
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I love YA, but I do not love PG.  HFYA is very good....but I am not going to venture that way.  I keep trying and trying thinking its just my issue...but nop.  Just don't care for her.

Date Posted: 3/21/2012 12:34 AM ET
Member Since: 8/12/2005
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I made it through all 28 pages. I skimmed a lot. The writing is terrible. no

This excerpt covers three chapters; she ends each one at a key dramatic moment, then completely shifts scenes without resolving the prior cliffhanger. This gives the whole narrative a nonsensical feel. A lot has happened in 28 pages, but none of it makes sense.

So far we've got a young novice priest kicked out of his monastery & taken to a strange abode, where he is roused from bed to be marched into a meeting with unknown inquisitors. When we next see him, he's traveling to a nunnery on some sort of secret mission. Traveling with him is a clerk who has all of the novice's orders written out in advance, with instructions to give him one note a day. (What is this, a scavenger hunt?)

Then there's the young heiress whose father has promised to leave her a whole castle and accompanying lands (so she won't ever have to marry if she doesn't want to; quite a forward-thinking dad!) But she's told by her brother the day after her father's death that he changed his mind in his last moments, and she must either marry a man she finds repugnant (and dear old dad left her a skimpy dowry, so no one else will have her) or she must join a nunnery. Scant explanation is given for her loving and progressive father's change of heart. The scene shifts as she weighs her choice; we see her next at the nunnery, where a screaming girl starts bleeding from her palms in the middle of the night. surprise

Ick, just dreadful. I'd sooner have dental surgery than read several more chapters of this drivel. Oh ... I forgot to mention the novice's servant, who keeps feeding us backstory by having conversations with his HORSE! These bits of exposition don't clear anything up. They only muddy the waters further.

I should have stopped at the first sentence, which reads ""The hammering on the door shot him into wakefulness like a handgun going off in his face." Besides being a dreadful simile ... did they have handguns in 1453 in Rome? (Just checked Wikipedia - apparently small, muzzle-loading "hand cannons" date back to about a century earlier. But that line still conjurs the image of a .38 Special going off in the poor kid's face.)

I'm SO glad I gave up on Gregory after reading The Other Boleyn Girl (a guilty pleasure) and The Boleyn Inheritance (which was pretty well written). After that, all the negative reviews of her books put me off. I HATE when she's referred to as "an established historian" (as she is at the end of this excerpt).



Last Edited on: 3/21/12 12:36 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 3/21/2012 3:46 AM ET
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Well Felica at least the horse didn't talk back.  LOL! 

Date Posted: 3/21/2012 5:38 AM ET
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 "an established historian"

No. No. No. Will that never stop? Thanks for taking the hit for the team Felicia.

Well Felica at least the horse didn't talk back.  LOL! 

So that means we shouldn't be complaining? cool

 

Date Posted: 3/21/2012 6:56 AM ET
Member Since: 7/7/2007
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<<at least the horse didn't talk back.>>

Heck, that might have seriously improved the dialogue.  devil

Date Posted: 3/21/2012 9:23 PM ET
Member Since: 10/21/2010
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Heck, that might have seriously improved the dialogue.  devil

yesyes

Date Posted: 3/21/2012 10:38 PM ET
Member Since: 8/12/2005
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SPEW!

Don't get me wrong. Humans talking to animals CAN work in fiction. Some of the best scenes in Georgette Heyer's Arabella are of Mr. Beaumaris mulling over how he feels about her in monologues directed at his dog.

It works in that case because: 1. His words provide clues to his inner feelings; 2. The dog is a scruffy mutt Arabella herself foisted on him, so the animal is sort of a stand-in for her; 3. A member of the ton who is considered the epitome of fashion and good taste talking about his emotions with a lowly dog makes for some funny reading.

But the following ... not so much. (Spoken after the novice priest is called "hoity-toity" by the nun who answers the door at the nunnery.)

"Hoity-toity, is it?" Freize questioned the horse as he led him to the stables ahead. ""A virgin so old she is like a pickled walnut, and she calls the little lord a beardless boy? And him a genius and perhaps a changeling?"

Or ...

"Do I need a clerk?" Freize asked himself as he reined in his horse and dropped behind the two men. "No. For I do nothing and know nothing, and if I did, I wouldn't write it down - not trusting words on a page. Also, not being able to read or write would likely prevent me."

cheeky