Book Reviews of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close
Author: Jonathan Safran Foer
ISBN-13: 9780618329700
ISBN-10: 0618329706
Publication Date: 4/4/2005
Pages: 368
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 148

4.1 stars, based on 148 ratings
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

49 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 173 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 6
This book is written in a non-traditional style. This does not at all diminish the impact of the the themes and characters - in fact it enhances them. Hang in there, the agony of reading some of the sections (stream of consciousness, absent correct spacing and punctuation) - will create in you a deeper appreciation of the character's feelings.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 27 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 5
A 9 year old boy has lost his father in the 911 World Trade Center crash. There are 2 stories within the novel. Also the life of his grandfather. It's a good read but very unusual.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 29 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
Exactly as the title describes, this is a rapid fire ride with a very precocious 9 year old who lost his father in the Twin Towers on 9/11.
It's impossible to describe and impossible to put down.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 92 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
This book is about a little boy searching for clues about his father who died at the World Trade Center on 9/11/01. The boy is precocious, the story is heart breaking. There is also background information regarding his grandparents that is pertinent. A difficult read (emotionally), but an important one.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 59 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
A beautiful book, but don't expect a "traditional" narrative. With a young boy as our narrator/hero, we jump from subject to subject and character to character. The death of his father on 9/11 is handled very respectfully (not to mention it made me tear up on a few occasions- and not by being sappy or manipulative) it's a lovely character journey that has an engaging plot wrapped around it. Some of it reminded me of one of my favorite novels, written by Foer's wife funnily enough- The History of Love, which I HIGHLY recommend if you enjoyed this one.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 291 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
WOW! I cannot tell you how much this book really blew me away. So well-written, and so compelling a story! This is the story of Oskar Schell, a precocious nine year old who finds a key in his father's closet and sets out to find what the key goes to. It is a story of love and loss and family and 09/11, and as previously mentioned, is such a great read that it kept me coming back to it after I put it down. I started off reading this on my color Nook, but I quickly found out that this book has some unusual formatting and pictures which don't carry through very well on the Nook. I ended up going to buy a paper copy and was able to catch up with what I missed, but I don't recommend reading it on the Nook. It is one awesome book, though and not to be missed.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 39 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
ACK!! Two days I will never get back. This was the most convoluted, poorly written, hard to follow book I have read in years. I was going to see the movie but I fear it will be as badly written as the book. What a waste.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 94 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
A very touching and complex read. A new and enlightening perspective of those affected by the tragedy on 9-11.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on
Helpful Score: 2
I really hate to discourage readers, but this book really wasn't that good. I've seen the previews for the movie, which is the whole reason I bought the book. I found it to be very confusing. I had to go back and re-read pages because I got lost. Many of the dialogue scenes are especially confusing because it's unclear which character is talking. There are whole paragraphs where each sentence is divided into quotation marks, so you have to go back and re-read to determine who is talking when. I'm so disappointed with it that I won't even see the movie. I hope that someone else is able to better understand this book. If you do, please explain it to me. :-)
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 111 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Oskar Schell is the unforgettable protagonist of Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. What other nine-year-olds send fan mail to Stephen Hawking? Oskar is highly intelligent and quirky, but at heart is simply a young boy grieving the loss of his beloved dad. The reader learns through flashbacks of the very special relationship Oskar and his dad had. Oskar's quest brings him on a journey toward recovery and maybe the realization that the value of his relationship with his dad can be measured in things other than length of time. A parallel story of Oskar's grandparents, who lived through the bombing of Dresden, reminds readers that previous generations have faced cataclysmic events and been broken, but have survived. The author's unorthodox use of photographic and typographic elements, for me, did not distract or necessarily enhance the story, but I can see where others might feeling strongly about their use. Highly recommended, though you will left with "heavy boots."
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 181 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Unlike "Everything_Is_Illuminated," which I read about 2 years ago, the tone of this novel was a very consistent balance of extremely funny and incredibly sad.

How can you not love an idiosyncratic nine-year-old narrator who says things like, "Succotash my Balzac, dipshiitake," because he's not supposed to curse? A kid who hands out a business card printed, "OSKAR SCHELL: INVENTOR, JEWELRY DESIGNER, JEWELRY FABRICATOR, AMATEUR ENTOMOLOGIST, FRANCOPHILE, VEGAN, ORIGAMIST, PACIFIST, PERCUSSIONIST, AMATEUR ASTRONOMER, COMPUTER CONSULTANT, AMATEUR ARCHAEOLOGIST, COLLECTOR OF: rare coins, butterflies that died natural deaths, miniature cacti, Beatles memorabilia, semiprecious stones, and other things." Maybe I just have a thing for precocious children, possibly because I was one, but I loved this kid. I cared about his quest to find the lock matching the key he found in his father's closet, after said father died on 9/11. I was amused by his crazy interactions with people throughout New York.

Interwoven into Oskar's quest, is the story of his grandparents, who as teenagers survived the bombing of Dresden. The comparison/contrast of these two tragedies adds a lot of depth to the plot and also causes the reader (at least this reader) to think. I won't burden you with what I thought, so as to not influence what you might think. (Oh, the thinks you can think.)

Overall, a great book. I think this one will become a classic, for both the writing and the historical context.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 47 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Hands down, one of the best books of all time.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 200 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
I was hesitant to read this, as I lost a friend in the WTC on 9/11, but the story's main character -- a wise, clever and funny 9 year old boy who lost his father on 9/11 -- brings empathy and compassion and has renewed my own faith in humanity. All I'm left to say is ... wow. Very highly recommended.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 10 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I was really looking forward to this book, but I just didn't enjoy it. I usually don't have a problem with "stories within stories" but I just didn't enjoy the storyline about Oskar's grandfather,. I found those parts of the book to be difficult to slog through, and they left me feeling depressed and sad, which was my overall feeling upon finishing the book. Again, it's usually not a problem for me to read stories about difficult or depressing topics, but this one was too much for me!
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 601 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
While I liked Oskar, the boy who is the central character in this book and I enjoyed the story along the way, it wound up being a let down for me. Oskar finds a key on his father's closet shelf and begins a somewhat futile search for the lock it belongs to because it helps him feel close to his dad. It is entertaining and has some colorful characters along the way, but the story winds up being more about his grandfather, who drowns himself in self pity, and the impact of that on the lives of those who tried to care about him. It wraps up loosely and is somewhat depressing in the end.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 22 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Hmm. Typically when I finish reading a book I have a very strong opinion one way or the other, but after finishing "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close" I was left feeling lonely and confused. Confused because I wanted to love the book but didn't. Lonely because, well, I was traveling for work and was cooped up in a tiny hotel room overlooking a vacant parking garage on the outskirts of Seattle, Washington. And it was raining. Go figure.

Anyway, this is the first Foer novel that I've read, mainly because a very good friend of mine, who happens to be an author, attempted reading "Everything Is Illuminated" years ago and despised it. He felt that Foer's style was pretentious and gimmicky. This feedback stuck with me over the years, but after enjoying the film version of "Everything is Illuminated" I decided to go against my better judgement and give this one a try. I mean, the story's about a young kid pining away over his father's death which occurred during the 9/11 attacks....How could I not like it??

And that my friends, is what I'm currently struggling with. Have I no soul? How could a story that's so deeply rooted in one of America's greatest tragedies not resonate within me? The only logical answer that I can come up with is Foer's style of writing, specifically his decision to alternate narrators between chapters, each having their very own different style of writing. Now, I completely understand why Foer did this, but damn if it didn't grow tedious after a while.

Another huge issue for me was Oskar Schell's character. Plain and simple, the vast majority of nine year old kids do not talk or act like Oskar does throughout this book. Nine year old kids do not spend months venturing alone or with complete strangers around New York City without something bad eventually happening to them. Nine year old kids pick their noses, play video games, and speak in grammatically incorrect English. Oddly enough, reading this book reminded me of "Dawson's Creek"...you know, that show that we were all hooked on in the late 90's. It wasn't the type of show that I typically watched, but damn I grew fixated on the trials and tribulations of the Dawson/Joey/Pacey love triangle. How could you let her go Dawson? How?

Anyway, my point is, those high school kids from Capeside, Massachusetts did not talk like high schoolers, but rather like pretentious English professors. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that the show's content needed to be dumbed down for its viewers, but with each seventeen syllable word that Dawson blurted out the show began loosing some of it's plausibility...and that's exactly the problem with Foer's portrayal of Oskar. Kids like Oskar are not normal, and thus difficult to relate to.

With all of that said, all is not lost with "Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close." I found the excerpts discussing the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks and the profound impacts on Oskar's life incredibly moving. Damn those answering machine messages were haunting weren't they? The world hasn't been the same since that dark day and all of us can relate to the disaster in one way or another. On a personal level, I almost lost my father in a car crash a few years ago and I can completely relate to Oskar's struggle in coping with the loss of his father.

When all was said and done though I was left wanting more. I really wanted to love this book. I wanted to care about Oskar and the outcome of his journey. I wanted to believe that nine year old kids like Oskar really exist...nine year olds that talk like young adults and have the ability to adeptly travel unaided through the most populous city in the United States. Sadly, while I may have been able to suspend my disbelief in order to thoroughly enjoy "Dawson's Creek", I wasn't able to do so for this novel.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on
Helpful Score: 1
At times I did not understand this book. HOWEVER I found it very compelling to read. I love Oskar's iniative and quirky personality. It is a book that touches your soul and you won't be sorry to have read it. I feel like a better person because of it, not sure why. It is a very touching heartfelt story.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 73 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Different, riddling and very moving.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 636 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I thought this book was much better than _Everything is Illuminated_. I really enjoyed it, despite some of its oddities (like the photographs, the red circles and improper conversation. Still, it was a moving book that was quite pleasurable to read. I'll definitely keep an eye out for his work from now on. I'm surprised over some of the images that he was able to print in his book. I'm also quite surprised that I enjoyed it as much as I did, but I think that's in large part because of my great love for child narrators.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on
Helpful Score: 1
original and delightful
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 85 more book reviews
This story centers on a 9-year-old, Oskar, whose father was killed on 9/11. About a year after the 9/11 tragedy, Oskar finds an envelope with a key in it marked "Black" in his father's closet. Because of Oskar's incredibly active imagination, he goes on a quest to find what the key opens, attempting to interview all the Black's living in NYC. Interspersed between Oskar's quest are letters written by his grandparents concerning their history, which includes the firebombing of Dresden. This book, from hilarious to heartbreaking, was a tough read for me... it rambles some... but it kept my interest piqued and I found it incredibly intelligent. Tough to explain but I can honestly say, I loved it.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 119 more book reviews
I'm not sure if this is a book that would be better read than listened to but I absolutely loved it on audio. It took me a little while to get into the 2nd and 3rd narrators but once all 3 story lines started to sync up, I was hooked. Several people have told me they cried while reading this book. I didn't but I found it to be very intense, especially toward the end. I found myself almost holding my breath at parts, listening intently, waiting to hear what happened next. I highly recommend this one for listening.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 3 more book reviews
Interesting writing style. The book was kind of hard for me to "get into" but I powered through and ended up really enjoying the story. Maybe not a "must-read" but definitely worth reading if you have a PBS credit.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 22 more book reviews
so wonderful but the end left something to be desired. not full closure.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on
Great book!
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 17 more book reviews
I have to agree with the other reviews. Found myself so confused and really not all that vested in finding out what happens in the end. It is just weird and not in a good way. Very little about 9/11 except that you know that the dad died that day. I thought the movie looked interesting so I assumed the book would be even better. Sadly, gave up about half way through even though it was for my book club. Since I now know what happens I shall move on.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 33 more book reviews
AN incredibly different and insightful book, a must read!
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Review first published on my blog: http://memoriesfrombooks.blogspot.com/2012/01/extremely-loud-and-incredibly-close.html

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is the story of nine year old Oskar Schell. His father died in the World Trade Center on September 11. Oskar is in the care of his mother and grandmother. He finds a key that belonged to his father and makes it his mission to find the lock that it fits. I suppose it helps him hold onto his father and brings him some measure of comfort. The book is his search for the lock and the vast array of characters he meets along the way.

I loved the main character. Oskar is a little boy who has suffered a devastating loss that no child should ever have to face. I wanted to make Oskar feel safe again. As such, I really really wanted to like the book. Unfortunately, I did not.

The entire book seem far-fetched. I understand that the adults in the situation were dealing with their own loss in their own way. However, it seemed that Oskar was dealing with his loss all alone. He spends time by himself and wanders the streets of New York searching for this lock.

In addition, throughout the book was also the feeling that I had to read between the lines and see the message within. I loved the story of Oskar and of this grandparents, but it felt too difficult to search for the pieces of the story through the construction and writing style of the book. The book left me unsatisfied and sad.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 8 more book reviews
This book was something else. Oskar is an amazing little boy who faces so many struggles and conquers them. I suggest this book to anyone who loves to read.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on
One of the best books I've ever read in my life. I was hesitant to read anything about the terrorist attacks in New York on September 11, 2001 as its still very upsetting to me (as a New Yorker). However, the delicate, sensitive way Foer handles this in both the character of Oscar and just the beautiful way he writes, made me very glad I read it. I very much liked the other threads of the story as well which were also of loss or trauma and various journeys toward healing. Highly recommend.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 3 more book reviews
I thought it was a great book, interesting, unusual, touching.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 15 more book reviews
I really love Foer's writing style. He manages to make lovable, quirky characters that just jump off the pages while telling a wholly creative story.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 20 more book reviews
Read it!
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on
Good story, and the main character is completely unique; but I'm not a fan of his writing style.
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This book is really amazing. The ending will make you cry.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on
SOOOOOOO GOOOOOOOD
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 275 more book reviews
A very unusual and achingly beautiful book. Wonderful unforgettable characters. Very sad and yet somehow cathartic.
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Had to read this for a book club and the subject matter was a little disturbing. It did turn out to be a great book for discussion though.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 76 more book reviews
very unusual book. most in my book club liked it. author was able to go inside mind of a child who lost his father on 9/11...
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 3 more book reviews
Good book but a "different" sort of read! Not your typical book, but great story.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 3 more book reviews
Nine year-old Oskar Schell has embarked on an urgent, secret mission that will take him through the five boroughs of New York. His goal is to find the lock that matches a mysterious key that belonged to his father, who died in the World Trade Center on the morning of September 11. This seemingly impossible task will bring Oskar into contact with survivors of all sorts on an exhilirating, affecting, often hilarious and ultimately healing journey.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on
Liked it a lot. Especially because we live close to WTC site.
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I found this book very confusing. I wanted to like it, but finally gave up about 150 pgs in as it was torture.
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I loved it! I didn't want to put it down!
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on
I'm sorry. I know there are a lot of positive reviews here but this isn't one of them. I wanted to like this book but the main problem was I found Oskar quite irritating. If he lived in the neighborhood I grew up in (Queens), Oskar would get beat up, a lot. I could only get through the first CD before giving up and moving on.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 34 more book reviews
Jonathan Safran Foer's book eloquently tells the story of a little boy's search for a secret lock, after losing his father in the World Trade Center attack. Not at all melodramatic, the story is incredibly touching. Foer captures the voice of the young boy brilliantly.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 213 more book reviews
I really enjoyed it!
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I had a hard time getting into this one, but others in my book group liked it.
reviewed Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close on + 10 more book reviews
A 9-yr old boy begins a citywide search for the lock that matches a key he has inherited from his father.