Book Reviews of A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1)

A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1)
A Family Apart - Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1
Author: Joan Lowery Nixon
PBS Market Price: $7.59 or $3.69+1 credit
ISBN-13: 9780440226765
ISBN-10: 0440226767
Publication Date: 3/1996
Pages: 162
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 4.6/5 Stars.
 12

4.6 stars, based on 12 ratings
Publisher: Laurel Leaf Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

10 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on + 38 more book reviews
A great book!
reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on + 126 more book reviews
Great book on AR list
reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on + 12 more book reviews
This is the first book in the orphan train quartet. It is a good read.
reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on + 11 more book reviews
Havwe you heard of the Orpahan trains? makes me sad.

Widowed Mom of six 1856 out of NYC cannot watch all her children. Her only option is to send them on the orpahn train and save her money and get her kids back later.... the children are not kept togehter and the kids are adopted by bad families and will they ever get back together? This is the first book.... you be hooked.
reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on + 9 more book reviews
A story of true mother's love. In 1856 in New York City a widow realizes that she cannont give her 6 children the life they deserve. She makes the ultimate sacrifice of love and sends them west on the orphan train to find better lives with new families. The children are not only seperated from their mother but end up being seperated from each other--all but Frances, the oldest, and Petey, the youngest. Frances promised her mother she would look out for Petey. Follow "Frankie's" adventures as Frances masquerades as a boy to keep that promise and finally understands how splitting up the family was really her mother's act of love.
reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on + 552 more book reviews
Winner of the Golden Spur Award
This is as close to perfect book as you'll buy. Filled with just plausible historical figures and incidents.

Annotation
When their mother can no longer support them, six siblings are sent by the Children's Aid Society of New York City to live with farm families in Missouri in 1860.

From the Publisher
When their mother can no longer support them, six siblings are sent by the Children's Aid Society of New York City to live with farm families in Missouri in 1860.

From The Critics
Children's Literature
From the 1860s to the late 1920s orphaned children were rounded up in New York City and sent via train to live with farm families in Missouri and other points West. Nixon's first book in the series, "The Orphan Train Adventures" finds a struggling widowed mother trying to feed and care for six children. When her eldest son is caught stealing for the family his mother makes the choice to send her children West to protect her son from jail and all of them from a miserable life. Her eldest daughter becomes the strength of the family by trying to make sense of why their mother has seemingly abandoned them. What will become of them? Who will be their new families? Will they ever see each other again? The series begins to unfold in this extremely moving and well-paced novel. It provides a rich look into problems immigrant and orphaned children faced during a difficult time in our developing nation. Highly recommended for classroom and libraries. 2000, Gareth Stevens, Ages 8 to 12,
reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on
My son enjoyed this book, he has not been reading much, and to see him really enjoying something other than a video game is refreshing.
reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on + 2 more book reviews
Loved this! Fun read that kept me at it till the book was done! Ended up buying the rest of them and loved them all, this one is probably the best, makes you cry;)
reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on + 8 more book reviews
The series begins to unfold in this extremely moving and well-paced novel. It provides a rich look into problems immigrant and orphaned children faced during a difficult time in our developing nation. Highly recommended for classroom and libraries. 2000, Gareth Stevens, Ages 8 to 12,
reviewed A Family Apart (Orphan Train Adventures, Bk 1) on
From Publishers Weekly
This first book of the Orphan Train Quartet tells the story of Frances Mary, 13, eldest of the six Kelly children. Life in New York's grim 19th century slums consists of hardship for the poor but honest Kelly clan. When widowed Mrs. Kelly feels that she is no longer capable of providing for her children, she sends them west on the Orphan Train, to be adopted by farm families. Frances masquerades as a boy in order to be adopted with Petey, the brother she promised her mother she would protect. The practical difficulties Frances faces in maintaining this disguise are handled in an amusing and thoughtful manner. Since Frances and Petey are adopted by a couple with strong abolitionist sympathies, it should come as no surprise that Frances, just days after her arrival on the farm, finds herself helping two runaway slaves on the Underground Railroad. Though the plot is predictable and sometimes overly sentimental, and the Kelly family lapses into stilted Irish syntax, the rapid succession of high-spirited adventures make for lively reading. Ages 10-up.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc.


From School Library Journal
Grade 5-8 First of a projected quartet of orphan stories, each about a member of the same family of children transported by orphan train from New York to St. Joseph, Missouri, and surrounding areas. A kind of period piece, circa 1860, A Family Apart has a distinct Horatio Alger tone. Well constructed incidents, including the widowed mother giving up her children so they can be sent west to find a better life, a grass fire set by sparks from the train, and a holdup of the train contribute to fast action and considerable suspenseparticularly about the oldest girl, Frances, who disguises herself as a boy so she can better help her brothers and sisters. An Orphan for Nebraska (Atheneum, 1979) by Charlene Joy Talbot is a similar orphan train story, but about one boy. Patricia Beatty's That's One Ornery Orphan (Morrow, 1980) is more humorous but less of a saga. What happened to orphans and street children of the last century may well appeal to many of today's children who hear so much about street children and abducted and deserted kids. George Gleason, Department of English, Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc.