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Topic: Your favorite post-apocalyptic book

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Date Posted: 11/18/2012 3:33 PM ET
Member Since: 1/17/2011
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I have not read that one yet, but just added it to my list. Thanks

Date Posted: 11/18/2012 3:35 PM ET
Member Since: 1/17/2011
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Have not read that one yet, but I just added it to my list. Thanks Pamela

 

Nature's End The Consequences of the Twentieth Century
Author:
Whitley Strieber, James Kunetka 

 

 

Date Posted: 12/6/2012 9:09 AM ET
Member Since: 2/11/2008
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I met local Pensacola author, Ron Tew, at an art show and he talked me into trying his book, Second Flood. More mid-apocalyptic, or maybe early-apocalyptic, but a quick read and enjoyable enough characters. There are a few points that could be argued, but overall I really enjoyed it.

Date Posted: 12/19/2012 4:25 AM ET
Member Since: 10/21/2009
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I love this book: Into the Forest
Author: Jean Hegland

Date Posted: 12/22/2012 12:40 PM ET
Member Since: 4/5/2011
Posts: 6,260
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My favorite is Swan's Song.

Date Posted: 1/26/2013 9:41 AM ET
Member Since: 2/25/2007
Posts: 13,991
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I was looking for comments on "The Passage" (found them a couple pages back) and "The Twelve." I just read Passage a couple months ago, now into Twelve.

I'm kinda with Greg; the first part of Passage was great, then when it jumped ahead I liked it OK, but not as much.

Now I am seriously struggling with "The Twelve." It's  really hard for me to keep up with.

It jumps around so much, both in time, and from character to character. It's almost impossible to keep track of who did what, when.



Last Edited on: 1/26/13 9:43 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 1/26/2013 9:47 AM ET
Member Since: 2/25/2007
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While I like post-apoc a lot as a genre, I think when "supernatural" characters are involved---zombies, vampires, etc---that's a different kind, maybe a sub-genre, than when you're dealing with a more "realistic" end-of-the-world scenario.

That's why I liked "One Second After" and "Alas Babylon," and Warday, and much less interested in the sci-fi and paranormal versions.

Date Posted: 1/26/2013 10:37 AM ET
Member Since: 6/21/2008
Posts: 6,550
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I think this easy to read PostApoc novel can be enjoyed by most.  Ignore the stupid title:  Go-Go Girls of the Apocalypse.  I have given it 4.5 stars.  Really pretty fast and good read.  And the book actually makes some really interesting points about society.

Betty, this one is one you may like based on your comments above.



Last Edited on: 1/26/13 10:38 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 2/18/2013 11:53 AM ET
Member Since: 1/17/2007
Posts: 12,808
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Got a new one to add: Hugh Howey's Wool. Originally released as a series of novellas, the set has been collected in an omnibus edition called, somewhat quixotically, the Wool Omnibus Edition. Post-global disaster stories about humans living underground in a vast "silo" for generations, hermetically sealed from the poisonous atmosphere on the surface, and how they come to terms with what life on the planet has become. It isn't perfect, but it is atmospheric and can be quite intense and surprising once in a while. Highly recommended.



Last Edited on: 2/19/13 2:48 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 3/8/2013 1:15 PM ET
Member Since: 12/23/2009
Posts: 26
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^^  Wool is VERY good, I'm reading it now!

Date Posted: 3/8/2013 1:43 PM ET
Member Since: 5/20/2008
Posts: 1,337
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The Kindle version of Wool Part 1 is currently free on Amazon if anyone wants to check it out. http:// Wool - Part One by Hugh Howey (Jul 30, 2011) - Kindle eBook $0.00 Kindle Edition

Date Posted: 3/15/2013 8:51 PM ET
Member Since: 6/21/2008
Posts: 6,550
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Swan Song by Robert McCammon        I finally bought the trade paperback.  The MMPB had such small type I couldn't even attempt it.  And then I waited a year to pick it up and crack it open.  It is terrific.  It is a Nuclear bomb apocalypse with a little magic, Diablo and good ole odd Americans. 

Date Posted: 3/19/2013 2:54 PM ET
Member Since: 12/23/2009
Posts: 26
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Some of my favorite post-apocalypse books (that aren't "classics" that pretty much everyone knows of) are:

 

Wool

Vampire Winter (this is, perhaps, my #1 favorite apocalypse book.  I've seriously read it at least once a year for the past 10 years)

Eternal Vigilence series

Year Zero

Date Posted: 3/30/2013 10:41 AM ET
Member Since: 8/25/2006
Posts: 18
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Many people already mentioned Cormac McCarthy's The Road, and the hype is well-deserved. But learn from my example: I started it in the evening, thinking I could always put it down and go to sleep. Around midnight I was absorbed and figured, since it's such a short book, I'd just stay up until I finished it. I finished it at about 2 a.m., and while books and movies do not scare me easily, The Road made it impossible for me to sleep, and made me jump at noises and shadows for several days after. It's terrifying because it is a) plausible, b) doesn't offer an easy way out in the end, and c) knows that humans are the real monsters. Read it in daytime, and have a pet or loved one close by so you can self-medicate with a hug afterward :-)

I also recommend Jim Crace's The Pesthouse -- which reads like a somewhat softer, more lyrical and ultimately more hopeful cousin of The Road -- and Esther Friesner's duology The Psalms of Herod & The Sword of Mary. These are little-known books (at least, I have yet to encounter someone else who has read them!), and present a dense, scarily plausible future world in which widespread ecological disasters have caused fundamental changes in human reproductive biology, and allowed society to evolve into an agricultural patriarchy with strict controls imposed on reproduction and distribution of resources. I don't want to go into details, since one of the pleasures of Friesner's writing is that everything is not laid out for you in the first chapter, and uncovering the many imaginative and disturbing facets of the story as you go along is these books' central pleasure.



Last Edited on: 3/30/13 10:45 AM ET - Total times edited: 3
Date Posted: 4/7/2013 12:10 AM ET
Member Since: 7/23/2005
Posts: 7,425
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I loved these:

The Afterblight series (various authors)

One Second After by William Forstchen

Go-Go Girls of the Apocalypse by Victor Gischler

The Last Survivors series by Susan Beth Pfeffer

James Howard Kunstler's  World Made by Hand  and The Witch of Hebron

H10 N1 by M.R. Cornelius

Oh, and the Dies the Fire series by S.M. Stirling.



Last Edited on: 4/7/13 12:31 AM ET - Total times edited: 2
Date Posted: 4/7/2013 10:55 AM ET
Member Since: 1/12/2011
Posts: 2,958
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I'm reading Wool right now too - it's awesome! Thanks for the recommendation Vostromo.

I also liked Far North by Marcel Theroux and The World Made by Hand. I have the Witch of Hebron, Wool Omnibus (parts 6-8) and One Second After on my TBR pile.

 

Date Posted: 4/7/2013 3:24 PM ET
Member Since: 6/21/2008
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someone here recommended this book.  I can't stop thinking about it.  5*


Last Edited on: 4/7/13 3:24 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 4/9/2013 8:15 PM ET
Member Since: 12/26/2008
Posts: 1,958
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I have not read the whole thread, but I just read Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood.  Loved it!!

Date Posted: 5/18/2017 7:37 AM ET
Member Since: 2/11/2008
Posts: 9,061
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Read this series out loud to my husband (we have a long commute) and we both liked it, and he's not usually a YA fan.

Date Posted: 5/18/2017 9:46 AM ET
Member Since: 6/30/2008
Posts: 3,009
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I'm surprised nobody mentioned Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban.

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