Book Reviews of Five Children and It

Five Children and It
Five Children and It
Author: Edith Nesbit
ISBN-13: 9780816707973
ISBN-10: 0816707979
Publication Date: 1/1997
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 4/5 Stars.
 8

4 stars, based on 8 ratings
Publisher: Troll Communications
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

18 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Five Children and It on + 4 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
I purchased this audio book for my two sons (8 & 11) to listen to on our cross-country drive. It is a wonderful story that any age could appreciate. This story is full of adventure and fun and we didn't want it to end. We loved the twists the grumpy Sammyadd put on all the children's wishes and how they got out of the trouble he put them in. I can highly recommend it for ages 6-10.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 386 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I saw the movie first and wasn't impressed. The book is nothing at all like it - unlike the movie, there is no war, no being sent away to an odd uncle's house, no demented cousin, and no traveling to another world to meet It. In fact, the only thing the book and movie have in common are five children and, well, It. It grants wishes, but the wish goes away at sundown. Of course nothing ever works the way it should and the children always seem to suffer the worst fate possible becuase of it - that is, they usually miss their dinner, and tea, too. For instance, the girls wish that they were all beautiful children, but when they get their wish nobody recognizes them, and they aren't let in the house at mealtime. They can't do anything with their beauty but sit under a bush waiting for sundown so they can be themselves again. I found myself giggling many times during the reading. Excellent for older people as well as kids.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This book has always been one of my favorite classics, right up there with the tales of OZ and Pooh. Who of us has'nt ever wished to fly?
What with a new film verison of it now out I felt it was time to re-visit the book.
Like so many other stories that get this treatment I feel a movie can not truly copy the rich charm with which this is written.

To some it may sound 'dated' but I feel it has that ageless charm of days gone by which reads like a classic story book. Works needn't be up to date to be loved forever...
reviewed Five Children and It on
Helpful Score: 1
Great writing style. The plot gets a little TV movie-like, and perhaps that is why this isn't a well known classic. In each chapter the children make a wish and end up having a big problem. This book will go over young children's heads because the author references so many different things that little children don't know of yet. I chose not to read this to my supersmarty 6 year old. I will wait a bit. A child of about 10-13 would enjoy this as a read aloud. Good book.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 386 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I saw the movie first and wasn't impressed. The book is nothing at all like it - unlike the movie, there is no war, no being sent away to an odd uncle's house, no demented cousin, and no traveling to another world to meet It. In fact, the only thing the book and movie have in common are five children and, well, It. It grants wishes, but the wish goes away at sundown. Of course nothing ever works the way it should and the children always seem to suffer the worst fate possible becuase of it - that is, they usually miss their dinner, and tea, too. For instance, the girls wish that they were all beautiful children, but when they get their wish nobody recognizes them, and they aren't let in the house at mealtime. They can't do anything with their beauty but sit under a bush waiting for sundown so they can be themselves again. I found myself giggling many times during the reading. Excellent for older people as well as kids.

There are two sequels to this book, The Phoenix and the Carpet, and The Story of the Amulet.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 3352 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Published 1977. One of those wonderfully carefree fairy tales which has quite a moral to it if you care to think about it. The fairy is a grouch, old Persian sand fairy which 5 children find. The children are free of parental yet basically good, in the way only a 1900 writer could tell about.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 4 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I purchased this audio cassette for my two boys to listen to on our cross country road trip. We loved this story about the grumpy sammyead who granted wishes always with an unexpected twist. This story is set in Victorian England and the main characters are children who have been left with their nanny over a weekend. What a weekend they had! They uncover the sammyead who has been sleeping since dinosaurs roamed the earth in a local quarry. He is obligated to grant wishes and often gives advice that the children just don't heed when saying "I wish......". We were sad to hear the story coming to an end. It kept us captivated until the end. No dirty language, no evil vs. good. Just fun and adventure from the turn of the century. I highly recommend this book for ages 6-12 (my boys were 8 & 11 at the time, and literary critics they are - they enjoyed it!).
reviewed Five Children and It on + 386 more book reviews
I saw the movie first and wasn't impressed. The book is nothing at all like it - unlike the movie, there is no war, no being sent away to an odd uncle's house, no demented cousin, and no traveling to another world to meet It. In fact, the only thing the book and movie have in common are five children and, well, It. It grants wishes, but the wish goes away at sundown. Of course nothing ever works the way it should and the children always seem to suffer the worst fate possible becuase of it - that is, they usually miss their dinner, and tea, too. For instance, the girls wish that they were all beautiful children, but when they get their wish nobody recognizes them, and they aren't let in the house at mealtime. They can't do anything with their beauty but sit under a bush waiting for sundown so they can be themselves again. I found myself giggling many times during the reading. Excellent for older people as well as kids.

There are two sequels to this book, The Phoenix and the Carpet, and The Story of the Amulet.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 386 more book reviews
I saw the movie first and wasn't impressed. The book is nothing at all like it - unlike the movie, there is no war, no being sent away to an odd uncle's house, no demented cousin, and no traveling to another world to meet It. In fact, the only thing the book and movie have in common are five children and, well, It. It grants wishes, but the wish goes away at sundown. Of course nothing ever works the way it should and the children always seem to suffer the worst fate possible becuase of it - that is, they usually miss their dinner, and tea, too. For instance, the girls wish that they were all beautiful children, but when they get their wish nobody recognizes them, and they aren't let in the house at mealtime. They can't do anything with their beauty but sit under a bush waiting for sundown so they can be themselves again. I found myself giggling many times during the reading. Excellent for older people as well as kids.

There are two sequels to this book: The Phoenix and the Carpet, and The Story of the Amulet.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 100 more book reviews
love love love this classic!
reviewed Five Children and It on + 386 more book reviews
I saw the movie first and wasn't impressed. The book is nothing at all like it - unlike the movie, there is no war, no being sent away to an odd uncle's house, no demented cousin, and no traveling to another world to meet It. In fact, the only thing the book and movie have in common are five children and, well, It. It grants wishes, but the wish goes away at sundown. Of course nothing ever works the way it should and the children always seem to suffer the worst fate possible becuase of it - that is, they usually miss their dinner, and tea, too. For instance, the girls wish that they were all beautiful children, but when they get their wish nobody recognizes them, and they aren't let in the house at mealtime. They can't do anything with their beauty but sit under a bush waiting for sundown so they can be themselves again. I found myself giggling many times during the reading. Excellent for older people as well as kids.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 3352 more book reviews
A great children's classic, the wonderfully imaginative fantasy delights imaginations young and old. The It of the title is a cranky, quirky sand fairy which is woken from his long sleep by four carefree, naughty children who proceed to ask for all sorts of wild and wonderful wishes. Life gets pretty hard when they get exactly what they ask for.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 386 more book reviews
I saw the movie first and wasn't impressed. The book is nothing at all like it - unlike the movie, there is no war, no being sent away to an odd uncle's house, no demented cousin, and no traveling to another world to meet It. In fact, the only thing the book and movie have in common are five children and, well, It. It grants wishes, but the wish goes away at sundown. Of course nothing ever works the way it should and the children always seem to suffer the worst fate possible becuase of it - that is, they usually miss their dinner, and tea, too. For instance, the girls wish that they were all beautiful children, but when they get their wish nobody recognizes them, and they aren't let in the house at mealtime. They can't do anything with their beauty but sit under a bush waiting for sundown so they can be themselves again. I found myself giggling many times during the reading. Excellent for older people as well as kids.

There are two sequels to this book: The Phoenix and the Carpet, and The Story of the Amulet.
reviewed Five Children and It on + 15 more book reviews
Classic British Children's fantasy, not to be missed! Enjoyable for adults, too, and an especially good choice for reading a chapter a night for family reading or bedtime stories.

Four children find a creature called a Psammead and it give them one wish a day for a period of time. Of course, they get into all kinds of scrapes as a result. It is really adorable.
reviewed Five Children and It on
My children and I loved this book!
reviewed Five Children and It on + 6 more book reviews
This was a favorite in our house. My children wanted to write the review:

From my 9yo daughter: This book was funny and cool! One chapter scared me ("Scalps") but it was OK in the end :-) I really liked this book!

From my 6yo daughter: This was my favorite book of all time!
reviewed Five Children and It on
Very good family entertainment for road trips!
reviewed Five Children and It on + 15 more book reviews
One of the best children's fantasy stories ever. Never gets old!