Book Reviews of Freaky Friday

Freaky Friday
Freaky Friday
Author: Mary Rodgers
ISBN-13: 9780439633994
ISBN-10: 0439633990
Rating:
  • Currently 3.8/5 Stars.
 6

3.8 stars, based on 6 ratings
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

15 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Freaky Friday on + 53 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
My middle-schooler read and liked this book. It's a good read for reluctant readers because it's a direct tie-in to the film(s). (Which WE loved!)
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 9 more book reviews
Annabel Andrews has got a rough life. Her annoying little brother, Ape Face, is constantly following her around, her mom is always after her to clean up, and Boris, the boy who lives upstairs, doesn't like her a bit. So, she thinks about who has life really easy-and all of a sudden it comes to her. Should she be her mother? And one freaky-and hilarious-Friday her wish comes true. From an out-of-control spin cycle to an outrageous parent-teacher conference to losing Ape Face, Annabel is running in a million different directions-and not having any fun. Will she be able to fix everything? And if she can't, how will she escape from her mother's body?
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 33 more book reviews
Annabel Andrews has got a rough life. Her annoying little brother, Ape Face, is constantly following her around, her mom is always after her to clean up, and Boris, the boy who lives upstairs, doesn't like her a bit. So, she thinks about who has life really easy - and all of a sudden it comes to her. She should be her mother! And one freaky - and hilarious - Friday her wish comes true. From an out-of-control spin cycle to an outrageous parent-teacher conference, to losing Ape Face, Annabel is running in a million different directions - and not having any fun. Will she be able to fix everything? And if she can't, how will she escape from her mother's body?
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 9 more book reviews
I loved this book and i think you will also. I liked it more than the movie.
Jessica Maas
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 23 more book reviews
This is a book about the first movie. I loved the movie and the book reads just like the movie.
reviewed Freaky Friday on
An excellent fiction story for those parents of teenagers, or teenagers who believe their parents are tyrants!!
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Like adventure books? Read Freaky Friday. Freaky Friday is a very interesting and funny book. Lindsay Lohan is Anna and Tess Colman is Anna?s mother. Her mother is very strict with her and her mother always wants the best for her mother. Tess needs to take care of their kids herself because her husband died, although she is soon getting married. Anna wants to be popular to every one. Anna?s brother is always messing around with her this annoys her. Anna likes playing in a band with her friends. Anna and her friends play in Anna?s garage. One day they receive the news that they want the band to give a concert. Anna is worried since is the mothers rehearsal dinner. Anna says this is no problem, she can handle it. Another problem occurs. One day they go to a Chinese restaurant. Anna and her mother fight because her mother doesn?t want to let her go to the rehearsal dinner. Anna and her mother had a fortune cookie. The fortune had the same message written in both fortune cookies. After the discussion an earthquake happens. They wake up the next morning and they have switched bodies How could they handle each other?s work and how are they going to pretend to be someone they are not? READ THE BOOK!! This is a very interesting and funny book. If you like adventure you should read it.
Review by "Holllitooo"
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Samantha Clanton, aka "Harlequin Twilight" for TeensReadToo.com

I don't know about anyone else, but whenever I hear the words Freaky and Friday, I automatically think back to Lindsay Lohan and Jamie Lee Curtis circa 2003. But this is a different FREAKY FRIDAY, the original, the better of the two in my opinion (I know there was another movie version in the 70s, but I've not seen it in years, and don't remember much about it besides Jodie Foster). This is the story of Annabel and Ellen Andrews, and Annabel needing to learn her lesson.

I will tell you now, don't expect the same exact story as the movie that you've probably seen at some point in your life; expect the same premise, but a better story. Annabel is the stereotypical 13-year-old girl: she's loud, bossy, and negative, hates her family and teachers, but loves her friends and annoying her brother. Annabel is a highly amusing narrator and she sees things like most kids do, i.e. better than adults give them credit for.

Annabel wakes up as her mother, gets dressed, fixes breakfast, sends Ben, aka Ape Face, and Annabel off to school, and then goes through her day in her mother's body. Dealing with all kinds of issues throughout the day, from the neighbor boy saying he loves her, losing both the kids, the police thinking she's crazy, and her husband's unexpected clients as guests, she handles it well...at first.

Not only does she have a wild ride, dealing with things her mother normally would have to deal with, she also has a school meeting to attend...about herself. She finds out things that she probably needed to hear, but things that hurt to hear, and that's where the lesson really starts to set in.

The majority of the story is told from Annabel's perspective, while she is in her mother's body, and that actually helps the humor even more. Take this little gem for instance: "Well, in case you're interested, a mouthful of heart is something like a mouthful of captured frog, and a mind in turmoil simply means all the blood in your body rushes around in your head, leaving you icy cold from the neck down. As for 'butterflies in the stomach,' there is no such thing. They are June bugs." You'll have to read the book to find out the context here, but there are plenty more humorous moments between the 175 pages that make up this book.

This is a quick read, but one I definitely recommend. It's funny and somewhat realistic, not in the whole switching bodies with your mother aspect, but in the way this family interacts with one another. I know that despite the length and the material that make up this adorable story, even I learned something about myself and I think everyone could take something away from this book, kids and parents alike.

The whole 1972 copyright may throw some people off, but don't let it; it's a story that is still relevant today and probably will continue to be for as long as there are 13-year-old girls with mothers and little brothers especially.
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 10 more book reviews
annibel thinks her mom has the best life. if she were grown up she could do what ever she wanted! then one morning she wakes up to find shes turned into her mother...and she soon discovers its not as easy as it looks.
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 160 more book reviews
Annabel thinks her mom has the best life. If she were a grown-up, she could do whatever she wanted! Then one morning she wakes up to find she's turned into her mother...and she soon discovers it's not as easy at it looks!
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 7 more book reviews
This is a popular and funny favorite of a mother and daughter magically switching roles. They both learn that the other person has challenges in their life that they do not understand until the switch takes place. A classic Disney story; also re-made just recently.
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 23 more book reviews
Excellent book!!!
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Very popular children's book
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Samantha Clanton, aka "Harlequin Twilight" for TeensReadToo.com

I don't know about anyone else, but whenever I hear the words Freaky and Friday, I automatically think back to Lindsay Lohan and Jamie Lee Curtis circa 2003. But this is a different FREAKY FRIDAY, the original, the better of the two in my opinion (I know there was another movie version in the 70s, but I've not seen it in years, and don't remember much about it besides Jodie Foster). This is the story of Annabel and Ellen Andrews, and Annabel needing to learn her lesson.

I will tell you now, don't expect the same exact story as the movie that you've probably seen at some point in your life; expect the same premise, but a better story. Annabel is the stereotypical 13-year-old girl: she's loud, bossy, and negative, hates her family and teachers, but loves her friends and annoying her brother. Annabel is a highly amusing narrator and she sees things like most kids do, i.e. better than adults give them credit for.

Annabel wakes up as her mother, gets dressed, fixes breakfast, sends Ben, aka Ape Face, and Annabel off to school, and then goes through her day in her mother's body. Dealing with all kinds of issues throughout the day, from the neighbor boy saying he loves her, losing both the kids, the police thinking she's crazy, and her husband's unexpected clients as guests, she handles it well...at first.

Not only does she have a wild ride, dealing with things her mother normally would have to deal with, she also has a school meeting to attend...about herself. She finds out things that she probably needed to hear, but things that hurt to hear, and that's where the lesson really starts to set in.

The majority of the story is told from Annabel's perspective, while she is in her mother's body, and that actually helps the humor even more. Take this little gem for instance: "Well, in case you're interested, a mouthful of heart is something like a mouthful of captured frog, and a mind in turmoil simply means all the blood in your body rushes around in your head, leaving you icy cold from the neck down. As for 'butterflies in the stomach,' there is no such thing. They are June bugs." You'll have to read the book to find out the context here, but there are plenty more humorous moments between the 175 pages that make up this book.

This is a quick read, but one I definitely recommend. It's funny and somewhat realistic, not in the whole switching bodies with your mother aspect, but in the way this family interacts with one another. I know that despite the length and the material that make up this adorable story, even I learned something about myself and I think everyone could take something away from this book, kids and parents alike.

The whole 1972 copyright may throw some people off, but don't let it; it's a story that is still relevant today and probably will continue to be for as long as there are 13-year-old girls with mothers and little brothers especially.
reviewed Freaky Friday on + 16 more book reviews
this book is new, but is a little warn but still good read, has a few crumbled pages but nothing that prevents any wear or tear.