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Gap Creek
Gap Creek
Author: Robert Morgan
Amazon.com Review — Oprah Book Club? Selection, January 2000: Robert Morgan's Gap Creek opens with one wrenching death and ends with another. In between, this novel of turn-of-the-century Appalachian life works in fire, flood, swindlers, sickness, and starvation--a truly biblical assortment of plagues, all visited on the sturdy shoulders of 17-ye...  more »
ISBN-13: 9781565122420
ISBN-10: 1565122429
Publication Date: 1999
Pages: 326
Rating:
  • Currently 3.9/5 Stars.
 54

3.9 stars, based on 54 ratings
Publisher: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
Book Type: Paperback
Other Versions: Hardcover, Audio Cassette, Audio CD
Reviews: Member | Amazon | Write a Review
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Top Member Book Reviews

  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
reviewed Gap Creek on + 16 more book reviews
3 member(s) found this review helpful.
A beautiful story about Appalachia and the strong mountain women who live there. They prevail in the face of natural disaster, life's tragedies, and cultural difficulties. Julie Harmon exhibits strength and grace as she embarks on her first year of marriage.
  • Currently 5/5 Stars.
reviewed Gap Creek on
1 member(s) found this review helpful.
Really liked this story -- poignant and stark.
  • Currently 3/5 Stars.
reviewed Gap Creek on + 3 more book reviews
1 member(s) found this review helpful.
I found this to be a quick, easy read. The scenery of the book is interesting, but the characters fell short and seemed flat. I'm not sure I would recommend it.

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  • Currently 2.5/5 Stars.
reviewed Gap Creek on + 18 more book reviews
Enjoyed this very much & learned a lot of details about difficult farm work.
  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
reviewed Gap Creek on + 8 more book reviews
Oprah Book Club® Selection, January 2000:
Summary/Editorial Review:

Robert Morgan's Gap Creek opens with one wrenching death and ends with another. In between, this novel of turn-of-the-century Appalachian life works in fire, flood, swindlers, sickness, and starvation--a truly biblical assortment of plagues, all visited on the sturdy shoulders of 17-year-old Julie Harmon. "Human life don't mean a thing in this world," she concludes. And who could blame her? "People could be born and they could suffer, and they could die, and it didn't mean a thing.... The world was exactly like it had been and would always be, going on about its business." For Julie, that business is hard physical labor. Fortunately, she's fully capable of working "like a man"--splitting and hauling wood, butchering hogs, rendering lard, planting crops, and taking care of the stock. Even when Julie meets and marries handsome young Hank Richards, there's no happily-ever-after in store. Nothing comes easy in Julie Harmon's world, and their first year together is no exception.
Throughout the novel, Morgan chronicles Julie's trials in prose of great dignity and clarity, capturing the rhythms of North Carolina speech by using only the subtlest of inflections. Clearly the author has done his research too--the descriptions of physical labor practically leap off the page. (Suffice to say, you'll learn far more about hog slaughtering than you ever dreamed of knowing.) Yet he resists the temptation to make his long-suffering characters into saints. Julie simmers with resentment at being her family's workhorse, and Hank flies into a helpless rage whenever he feels that his authority is questioned. In novels like The Truest Pleasure and The Hinterlands, Morgan proved his ability to create memorable heroines. In Gap Creek, he writes with great feeling--but not a touch of sentimentality--about a life Julie aptly calls "both simple and hard."


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