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Topic: Georgia High School Homeschoolers

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Subject: Georgia High School Homeschoolers
Date Posted: 7/22/2007 8:21 PM ET
Member Since: 5/8/2006
Posts: 20
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Hi ya'll.

I've just started another homeschool year, but now my oldest child has reached 9th grade, and I'm going through all the home school high school turmoil.

I'm finding that Georgia is rather a special state when it comes to homeschooling high schoolers and college admissions.  My cousin in TN homeschools in a rather modified unschooling way, but because she operates under an umbrella school, her program is "accredited" and her sons are eligible to attend most state universities (with appropriate grades and SAT/ACT scores, of course!).  Georgia doesn't have "umbrella" schools of that nature, though.

Are you using an accredited program for your college-bound high schooled homeschoolers or are you homeschooling eclecticly (if that's a word *grin*)?  If you're eclectic like me, do you stress late wondering if you've made the right decision not to go with an accredited program? 

Thanks for your feedback.

Happy with my decision, but still partly stressed!

Linda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Date Posted: 7/23/2007 1:39 AM ET
Member Since: 7/6/2006
Posts: 184
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Linda - I'm in Georgia too.  You might check out the HEIR.org site for more homeschool friendly colleges.

I wish that Georgia would get it's act together with regards to homeschooling and college.  Currently my child is in Middle School.

I can tell you that Shorter College, in Rome, is VERY GOOD to take homeschoolers without any accredited transcripts.
The problem is mainly with our PUBLIC education.  For instance, homeschoolers currently can't get HOPE for their first year - but I know there is a movement to change that. 

So if you have a student that is not in an accredited program, they can opt for portfolio review from the admissions staff.  Community college admission staff members - at least around here - are normally very helpful and want the kids to succeed, but I know they are busy too.

This is what my plan is - right now - as it stands.  I use that HOmeschool Tracker program, and I've bought the plus, so I document pretty much everything we do.  I plan on having my son take the SAT's with the subject matter test in Latin and Japanese, and put that with his transcripts from Tracker, a portfolio of art, a disk of his computer animation work and his self-made programs, and a Power point to show everything off.

If it is a problem, I plan on appealing directly to the dean at a community college.  See, the Dean has the right to admit a student without even going through the admissions process.  There's a limit on the number they can - I think it is something like 3% of the current enrollement, but still that is a lot of students that never try that route.

That's all we'll be able to afford without the HOPE anyway.  After that first year, if he does ok and qualifies for the HOPE, we'll take it from there.

That's my plan anyway.  I really wish the GA board of regents would get its act together on homeschooler admission.

Date Posted: 7/23/2007 1:43 AM ET
Member Since: 7/6/2006
Posts: 184
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http://www.heir.org/modules/mxdirectory/viewcat.php?op=&cid=5

There's a list of homeschool friendly colleges - but there ARE more than that.  I know that Shorter, here in Rome, loves homeschooled kids.  They've let several in at 15-16 years old.

Date Posted: 7/23/2007 11:15 AM ET
Member Since: 5/8/2006
Posts: 20
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Great.  That's a big help, Kristi.  Thanks!

My son wants to be an engineer -- civil or electrical, he's not sure which.  Georgia Tech is pretty tough for homeschoolers to get into, I've heard.  The school I graduated from, University of Alabama in Huntsville, is just as good IMHO, and is homeschool-friendly. The other college I wanted him to consider doesn't accept homeschoolers without a GED, and I'm NOT going that way.  I believe my homeschool high school has more "meat" to it than regular high school and it seems rather demeaning to have to get a GED after doing all that extra studying and taking more classes than necessary (pardon me as I hop down from my soapbox *chuckle*).  I didn't want to necessarily look out of state for college education, but things are looking that way...

Linda

 

 

 

 

Date Posted: 7/23/2007 5:36 PM ET
Member Since: 7/6/2006
Posts: 184
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Linda - one thing to remember is that anyone can start at a community college, and if they do well, TRANSFER - like into tech or wherever.

When you graduate, your degree is from TECH or wherever, and doesn't say a word about you spending a year or two at a community college.    Just work carefully with the advisor to make sure everything transfers.   If it won't - heck, get a 2 year degree and it will HAVE TO in the state system.



Last Edited on: 7/23/07 5:38 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 7/24/2007 12:33 PM ET
Member Since: 5/8/2006
Posts: 20
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Kristi --

Thanks so much again.  This conversation has been so helpful and productive for me.

I looked up Shorter College's homeschool admission policies and joint enrollment info.  Even better, they have a campus in Lawrenceville where I live.  This is excellent and gives me a goal for my son's preparation.  I'd love to have him do some joint enrollment classes there or at a similar college.  GHEA.org was very informative especially about the homeschool accreditation question.  I've always enjoyed Mary Hood's writing... she addresses the accreditation issue quite thoroughly.

Thanks billions for your info. 

No longer stressing :-)!!!

Linda