Book Reviews of The Giver

The Giver
The Giver
Author: Lois Lowry
ISBN-13: 9780440227274
ISBN-10: 0440227275
Publication Date: 5/12/1997
Reading Level: Ages 9-12
Rating:
  • Currently 4.4/5 Stars.
 31

4.4 stars, based on 31 ratings
Publisher: Laurel Leaf
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

174 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Giver on + 14 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 14
One of my favorite childhood books, The Giver is great for children and adults alike. Children can relate to the feeling of the main character, Jonas, and his struggle with growing up and being different. Adults will enjoy it because it shows what could happen in a community when every aspect of life is "controlled". This is a great read-aloud book, and even better as a gift!
reviewed The Giver on + 14 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 13
The Giver deals with important issues including individuality, diversity, and euthanasia. The book is classified as young adult literature, but the novel appeals to readers of all ages. I found it powerful and provocative
reviewed The Giver on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 10
The plot of this book has been described, well and often, in the editorial and customer reviews already posted, and I will not repeat that.
The Giver earned five stars from me on two points: technical quality and content. Technically, this book is very well-written, with a fast pace, no lulls, three-dimensional characters, a well-described setting, and no plot contradictions.

It is the story content that really elevates this book to five-star quality, however. Diversity and conformity are issues that surround us, in the news, in our neighborhoods, in our schools, in government and politics, and in the courts. "The Giver" puts the debate under a microscope, and it leaves room for no simplistic answers. It portrays an artificial society where diversity has just about been abolished. It depicts the benefits of that society, the shortcomings of it, and the internal conflicts caused in the mind of the protagonist. "The Giver" gives no answers, but gifts us with a wonderful way to look at an important question. This is a great book for a classroom project, or for a parent to read with his/her child. There are discussion questions listed at the end, that can be used as a launching pad for an intellectual exploration of the issues portrayed.

A non-spoiler spoiler: The end is intentionally ambiguous. While I have decided, for myself, what the ending means, each reader must make his/her own decision on what happened at the end.
reviewed The Giver on
Helpful Score: 8
I read this book in elementary/middle school and didn't think much of it. As an adult, however, it was one of the books that I remembered most. Your heart will go out to Jonas as he is given the information of the town. This book will make you feel just what the characters are feeling. I highly recommend this book for children and adults, alike. Happy reading!
reviewed The Giver on + 76 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 8
An interesting futuristic look into a "sameness" society. This book is not long and is suitable for pre-teens and teens. In fact, it was required reading for one of my children in Jr. High or HS. The ending packs quite a wallop.
reviewed The Giver on + 16 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 5
This book was one of my favorites as a kid, & I'm not even ashamed to admit that it's still a favorite to this day, & that I'll break it out & read it about once a year or so.

It really makes me think about society today, & the arguments surrounding anti-depressants--is it worth not feeling pleasure, & love, just to avoid the pain in life?

This book isn't anything that should be kept away from a child; instead it should be used to foster a heartfelt discussion with him or her.
reviewed The Giver on + 1519 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
This book is supposedly for young adults, but, frankly, is so scary I'm not sure I'd recommend a teen-ager read it. It has won a half dozen major literary awards, and clearly deserves them; is probably going to become a classic distopia like 1984 or BRAVE NEW WORLD.
-----From back cover:-----
Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear of pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the community. When Jonas turns 12 he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now, it is time for Jonas to receive the truth.
There is no turning back.
reviewed The Giver on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
Wonderful book! I could not put it down. Very intriguing storyline, easy and fast read - really makes you think. Just as interesting as an adult as it is for the younger readers. I would recommend it for anyone. By the author of Gathering Blue - another fantastic book.
reviewed The Giver on
Helpful Score: 4
Outstanding tale of life in a state-controlled utopian world through the experiences of a 12-yr-old boy. Would make excellent "Twilight Zone" episode. Easy read. Great for reluctant young adult readers.
reviewed The Giver on + 27 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
This was required reading for my children for school, so I thought I should read it also. It was worth my time. THE GIVER is a very thought provoking book about a perfect world. Is it really as perfect as it seems? Is a perfect world really what we all desire?
reviewed The Giver on + 153 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Although supposedly for "young" readers, adults will enjoy this book as well. I read it years ago and it made a strong impression -- so much so that I reread it recently. Gives you a lot to think about.
reviewed The Giver on + 643 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
In the "ideal" world into which Jonas was born, everybody has sensibly agreed that well-matched married couples will raise exactly two offspring, one boy and one girl. These children's adolescent sexual impulses will be stifled with specially prescribed drugs; at age 12 they will receive an appropriate career assignment, sensibly chosen by the community's Elders. This is a world in which the old live in group homes and are "released"--to great celebration--at the proper time; the few infants who do not develop according to schedule are also "released," but with no fanfare. Lowry's development of this civilization is so deft that her readers, like the community's citizens, will be easily seduced by the chimera of this ordered, pain-free society. Until the time that Jonah begins training for his job assignment--the rigorous and prestigious position of Receiver of Memory--he, too, is a complacent model citizen. But as his near-mystical training progresses, and he is weighed down and enriched with society's collective memories of a world as stimulating as it was flawed, Jonas grows increasingly aware of the hypocrisy that rules his world.
reviewed The Giver on
Helpful Score: 2
This cautionary tale is marketed to teens but adults will enjoy the story as well. The Giver is a story set in a future world where there is no poverty, sadness, violence, hunger, deformity, great pain or great joy. There is no music or art or fiction for pleasure. Everyone has a place in society. Everyone is more or less the same. Sameness is greatly valued. Individuality, freedom of choice, variety don't exist. . This is the story of Jonas a 12 year old boy who discovers that there is more to life than what he has been led to believe.

This book isn't very long but its message will stay with you for a long time. It's a book I would like my children to read when they are old enough. After reading this story, I came away with a greater appreciation for what we have in our lives. I had the same reaction to this book as I had to reading Orwell's 1984. As awful as our own world can be at times and as much as we want simplicity and order, what we have now is infinitely preferable to the perfect world depicted in The Giver.
reviewed The Giver on
Helpful Score: 2
This book sent a chill up my spine. It's too close to what's going on in politics right now. This is how life in America will be if we don't wake up to what's going on in Washington. Freedom of choice will be replaced by decisions from our government.
reviewed The Giver on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
In my top 5 favorite books of all time. Lois makes an amazing world and gives you an interesting perspective. I have lost count of how many times I have re-read this book, it never fails to amaze me, 1000 stars ;).
reviewed The Giver on + 5 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Lois Lowry is one of the greatest story-teller that will ever be. The Giver explores the beauty and limitations of a controlled utopian society. Sacrifices must be made and many things that were once rejoiced must be forgotten, but if no one remembers that such things ever existed, does it matter in the end?
reviewed The Giver on + 111 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This book is one that you won't forget anytime soon. It's kind of heartwrenching when Jonas finds out his job in life is to carry on the pain of the entire world, but you keep wanting to turn the pages finding out what happens next. I've never read a book quite like this one before. Not necessarily a feel good book, but I think you'll find you'll be glad you read it.
reviewed The Giver on + 40 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
A wonderful young adult novel. There are so many introductories to themes, plot, and character development that it's a great book for kids to read because they'll love the story and they'll learn how to read and enjoy literature. I just love this one.
reviewed The Giver on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
I love this book, it is such a unique storyline with a great message. Was easy to read and keep up with the story, I enjoyed it as an adult but will also be reading this with my daughter when she gets older.
reviewed The Giver on + 883 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Jonas has received his life assignment as Receiver of Memory. What does this mean? He is puzzled and frightened. After a year in training, Jonas is beginning to question the life he has led to date. He has discovered what it means to release someone from the community and it angers and frightens him even more. As Receiver of Memory in training he is able to watch his father release one of a pair of twins. In this society no one feels any emotion in depth, there is no color, the weather is the same day after day, and the environment is flat unmarred by hills, valleys, or gulches. There are few choices but likewise there is no pain, no hunger, and no real stress. Is this way he wants to live?
reviewed The Giver on + 59 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Very interesting story once it gets started. Very quick read.
reviewed The Giver on + 79 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
The Newbery Award Winner was fantastic. I love the aspect of a future world and future jobs. What kind of world are we heading into and are we going to comply with what's always been or venture out on our own. This was a very good book!
reviewed The Giver on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I first read this book in middle school. It still is my favorite. It really gives you something to think about.

What if you had no say over what you wanted to spend your life doing or who you were going to spend your life.

Most of all it gives a little more perspective on the little things we gripe about... whos cooking dinner, whos washing the dog, whos taking out the trash..
reviewed The Giver on + 4 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I have read this over and over. Good book.
reviewed The Giver on
Helpful Score: 1
Amazing book for all ages! I think I appreciated it more by being a young adult instead of a child/teen. A great read for anyone!!
reviewed The Giver on + 6 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
i love this book!!!
it has such an interesting different view!!
its about a community thriving for a perfect world.
if you liked this, then read the uglies seiries by scott westerfield
reviewed The Giver on
Helpful Score: 1
Have heard people mention this book several times and thought I'd pick it up for a quick read. I really enjoyed this book.
reviewed The Giver on + 2 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Wonderful book I enjoyed reading it very much. The story shows the complexities of life, but the story is related in a way that both children and adults will relate to and understand. Definitely worth the read.
reviewed The Giver on + 48 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Very interesting story. Gives thought to how we live and how we recognized free-will and it's many advantages. Left me with a load of thoguht-provoking questions.
reviewed The Giver on + 285 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
In this book the future is made up of communities with rules and governed with a watchful eye. In these communities there is no war, no crime, no heartache. There is also no love, no feelings of want, no colors. So which would be better? Our ways now or the ones in the future? Jonas feels that the old ways (our ways now) would be the best. Jonas has been given the job of Receiver. That job entails learning all the memories from the past from the old Receiver. Only one person can be this Receiver and he must hold all the memories within himself so it will not be released to the others in the community. For pure chaos could happen. Jonas goes through many painful memories of loss, war, starvation, etc but he also experiences memories of happiness, love and starts seeing the colors in everything. He believes everyone should have these memories and these feelings and sets out to make this happen.
I do admit that the ending boggled me for a bit. I realized that I could make the ending out to be the way I felt it should. You will be able to do the same. It is a very charming book that leaves you thinking long after you have finished.
reviewed The Giver on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Wonderful book to read with your kids. We had some great talks about the issues brought up in the book. I would give it more stars if I could!
reviewed The Giver on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I had to read this in high school and it ended up being one of my all time favorite books. Short, so a somewhat quick read, but each page has so much more there than what is written.
reviewed The Giver on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
enjoyedable and thought provoking
reviewed The Giver on + 80 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Wow. I just finished reading this book for the first time. The story is so moving and thought-provoking. Jonas's world is so different from our own, but reminds me that even though our feelings can be painful sometimes, they are ultimately what makes us who we are. A life void of feelings is not *really* living.
reviewed The Giver on + 10 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I read this book in High School. I actually enjoyed the book.
reviewed The Giver on + 26 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A very good book to be enjoyed by teens and adults
Should be read at least once!
reviewed The Giver on + 58 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
oooooooo... this one really makes you think in a similar manner as Orwell's 1984. Writing is at a lower level b/c I believe this is really a children's/young adult book, but nonetheless good for adults.
reviewed The Giver on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
The Giver is an amazing look into the psyche of humanity, and what makes us human. Although it is technically a young adult or children's book, this is a good book at any age. I definitely recommend the book over the movie, as the movie misses so many of the underlining subtleties that come through in the characters.
reviewed The Giver on + 9 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Not an easy read. i didn't enjoy it much, but perhaps thats because it was a required read in junior high.
reviewed The Giver on + 54 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Wonderful story, very interesting concept. Not sure yet how I felt about the end.
reviewed The Giver on + 129 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Requirement for many middle schools. Its about a fictional world that exists when people are programmed to believe that life is perfect and what happens when one child is picked to learn reality... excellent read! Blows your mind!!!
reviewed The Giver on + 12 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I loved this book when i read it in 7th grade. Its very powerfull, makes you think. <3 <3 <3 love iit!
reviewed The Giver on + 17 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Very powerful story.
reviewed The Giver on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
An interesting look at a "utopian" society.
reviewed The Giver on + 2218 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I picked this book up to read because I had heard it is a wonderful dystopian novel. It definitely was a great, if disturbing, read. I am very pleased that I finally got around to reading it.

Jonas was born into a world were couples are perfectly matched and each are given one boy and one girl. The children are given medication starting at twelve years old that stifles any emotional urges and then are placed in work positions most appropriate to their disposition. Jonas is different though, no one can guess what work he will be placed in. Then he finds out that he will be the society's new Receiver of Memory; the one person in society who doesn't have to follow any of the rules and is responsible for the memories of humanity. The old man who give Jonas these memories is forced to revel dangerous truths about their society to Jonas, they are truths that are truly stunning.

This was a wonderful book. It was easy to read and very well set up, the whole time you suspect that things aren't quite right but when the truth is revealed it is stunning. Much of the book reminded me of Huxley's Brave New World. Jonas is an excellent character and watching him transition from one of the ignorant masses to an enlightened individual is both painful and fascinating.

This is a short book, but it packs a lot of story and that story has a truly powerful punch to it. I found my self stunned and almost in tears at parts; so while this was not necessarily an easy read, it was definitely a thought-evoking and memorable one. I zipped through it quickly and found it very hard to put down. It is hard to talk about more of the plot without giving things away; but if you find dystopians fascinating and are intrigued by humans adopting sameness for safety you will find this book wonderful.

My least favorite part of the book was the very end, which is incredibly ambiguous. As a reader you know what probably happens, but you are hoping something else actually happened.

Overall this was just an absolutely fascinating read. It is creative and engaging and impossible to put down. It does pull some things from Huxley's a Brave New World. If you like this book or are looking for other excellent young adult dystopian reads I recommend the following: Divergent by Veronica Roth, Matched by Ally Condie, The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, and Withered by Lauren DeStefano.
reviewed The Giver on + 46 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
In a seemingly perfect world, Jonas feels safe. Everything happens when and how it should. There is no hunger, no fear. The only surprises in life is when you become a Twelve and you are given your job. It is the job the Elders picked with your interests and talents in mind. However, none of the jobs are that unusual.
Except for Jonas's job.
Under the special care of a mysterious man called the Giver, Jonas begins to see that his world is not perfect-- and that, in fact, is even more mysterious than his teacher.

Books in the trilogy by Lois Lowry:
#1 The Giver
#2 Gathering Blue
#3 The Messenger

This book is not only good for entertainment, but also for tons of discussion for book clubs, family time, etc. For adults and children alike, this book will cause you to really think about what a "perfect world" really means.
reviewed The Giver on + 5 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I love the books that make you ponder about the author's purpose. This is an exciting adventure that leaves room for interpretation and discussion.
reviewed The Giver on + 4 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I read this book overnight in sixth grade. It's an amazing book for young children, it's a great book for discussion. I really suggest this book for homeschooling parents teaching their children about societies.
reviewed The Giver on + 404 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This wonderful book is listed as a children's book but it is truly suited to advanced readers and adults.
reviewed The Giver on + 3 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Excellent book especially for Young Adult readers
reviewed The Giver on + 5 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
A truely wonderful and heartfelt book that makes you look at life and relize what you have.
reviewed The Giver on + 24 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
I read this in 4th or 5th grade. This is a book that has stuck with me throughout life. Another example of a Utopian society, and how perfect is not so perfect if you dare to think for yourself. All children should read this book, unless of course you want your children to care about the whole instead of individualism.
reviewed The Giver on + 16 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Jonas lives in a world with no emotions, a world without feelings. Most choices are made for the citizens for the community. Citizens in this community are very polite; they are controlled by the elders. If you make 3 mistakes, you are released. If your body does meet the average requirements, you are released. When you reach old age, you are released. At the age of 12 Jonas is assigned a job to work as a Receiver, like the other 12-year-old kids that were assigned a job. But Jonas job is special. As Receiver, he becomes the holder of all the memories for the community. As his wisdom grows with more and more memories, Jonas is faced with a hard choice.
I really liked this book. The basic premise was very interesting. It moves pretty fast, and kept my interest. I think it is a good book for all ages.
reviewed The Giver on + 87 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This book will make you think like few others will. Unsettling and riveting. You will never forget this book once you read it.
reviewed The Giver on + 7 more book reviews
I liked this book but the ending left me a bit confused. I really enjoyed the book for the most part and would recommend it to anyone.
reviewed The Giver on + 14 more book reviews
Very very inspiring. I liked it a lot. Lowry is one of my favorite authors ^^
reviewed The Giver on + 56 more book reviews
great book-fast read.
reviewed The Giver on + 6 more book reviews
Excellent book!
reviewed The Giver on + 902 more book reviews
This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
reviewed The Giver on + 18 more book reviews
Didn't like the ending, but the book was thought provoking.
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Kinda of slow read, but interesting about a different community where there is no war or fear or pain
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Excellent story, good set up for characters.
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I read this for my book club and while it held my interest and I am pretty sure I read it back in grade school, I was just so depressed at the end of the book. It was dark, full of sadness and made me feel really blue at the end. I don't think I will be reading the rest of the series.
reviewed The Giver on + 1239 more book reviews
REally liked this story. It made you think!!
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Award for literature for children,Jonas is 12 and is singled out to receive special training in a community where every person is assigned a rol. Reading group discussion guide, School Library Journal Best Book of the Year.
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This book was fantastic, and would be a great read for any middle school student or for someone who wants a quick, easy read that will make you think and reflect.
reviewed The Giver on + 9 more book reviews
One of my top ten favorite books. I'm not sure I can count how many times I have read this one. The story is appealing to readers of all ages, and shockingly relevant. I recommend this book without reservations.
reviewed The Giver on
When I was in 5th grade (many years ago), my teacher, Mrs. Thibodaux, read this to my class. I remember it being an excellent story and it was very entertaining, even for such a young mind. I recommend this to any reader that is looking for a wonderful story to remember for years (because I sure have)!
reviewed The Giver on + 215 more book reviews
I first read this book back when it was first published, and I'm happy to say that it's still a truly great book even now, when I'm quite a bit older. There's a surprisingly high amount of depth and meaning to the story, particularly given the age group it is written for, and I love it for that. My one real issue is the ending, which I knocked off a star for, because I hate it still. It's still a great reading option for younger and older readers alike though.
reviewed The Giver on
helps us to appreciate our freedom of choice
reviewed The Giver on + 40 more book reviews
This was an interesting book. I didn't like the ending but I just recently discovered that this is book #1 of a trilogy. Perhaps I should read the others.
reviewed The Giver on + 5 more book reviews
great book
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A great short book. Very intriguing and thought provoking...but the ending leaves you hanging a little bit. It's like a movie that you just know should have a sequal, it builds up your anticipation the last few chapters and then...well I am happy for the character but I wish I knew what happend next.
Good read, give it a try.
reviewed The Giver on + 107 more book reviews
This was one of those books I was required to read in school, but didn't give a crap, so I hardly remembered it. I am definitely glad I read it again because I appreciate books so much more now! This was a quick read but I loved the overall storyline and the emotions that Jonas and The Giver went through with each session. Great for Teens and adults! I will be reading the sequels eventually!

http://sheenathebookgeek.blogspot.com/
reviewed The Giver on
In a community that is all the same lives Jonas, who discovers he is very different. Jonas is the main character in the book The Giver, my favorite book. I loved The Giver because the plot was very creative, the theme was magnificent, and the setting was vivid. I think you should read this book for many reasons. The theme of this book is clearly represented: freedom, the right to make your own choices, uniqueness, and individuality are worth dying for. In Jonas's community, a commitee selects one's job, war is unheard of, all people wear the same attire, and all are assigned spouses and families. When Jonas is given the special, wonder-filled occupation of becoming the Receiver of Memory, he finds that there is much more to life. Through his task of becoming the Receiver of Memory, he discovers the meaning of love, pain, frustration, color, and cold. That is when Jonas realizes how much more there really is. Life soon becomes overwhelmingly unbearable in his world of "sameness." He finds life isn't worth living without the qualities (often that we take for granted) he discovered. That is when Jonas goes on a dangerous journey to find a land that is different. The setting in this book made it quite a pleasure. Everything in the community was predictable and pre-planned. The housing units were all the same. There were designated spots for everything. The setting helped develop the plot and theme. The mysterious ending leaves one filled with curiousity and wonder. The book, The Giver, by Lois Lowry is guaranteed enjoyment, especially for someone who likes a good theme and plot that ties in with the setting. I loved the boook The Giver, and I truly believe that everybody should read it!
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I first read this book in 6th grade, and then again in high school, and then again in college. I love Lois Lowry, and this book is definitely in my top 3 favorite Lowry books. I really like books that have more depth beyond just an interesting story. And this one definitely fits the bill in terms of meaningful exploration of ideas and a terrifically interesting plot.
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I did not like the ending. I didn't know which way to take it.
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Students love this book about a "perfect" world and what lies beneath. It makes them think about what they hear on a daily basis and how much of it is truth and how much is "cushioning" to make them feel more comfortable about uncomfortable topics.
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In this book the future is made up of communities with rules and governed with a watchful eye. In these communities there is no war, no crime, no heartache. There is also no love, no feelings of want, no colors. So which would be better? Our ways now or the ones in the future? This book kind of revolves around those kind of issues. For all the good that we see in this new world, there is actually bad too if you know what you're looking for. Jonas is just like any other child but he sometimes sees things that he thinks he imagines. Then the naming day comes and each kid his age gets to find out what they get to do for the rest of their lives. At Jonas's naming he was given the job of the "Receiver of Memories". Jonas learns that this fate is much harder than one realizes.
I loved the book. I loved the characters, the setting, etc. The reason there is 1 star missing is because I did not like the ending. I like endings to be all tied up with a pretty little bow. I don't like endings that do not totally end. One's that have you create your own ending by guessing. This one ends kind of up in the air. You get an idea of where it's going on but not totally sure.
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I generally have trouble with dystopian fiction and put this one off for some time.

Yet, when I started it, it was strangely compelling. In many ways it turns the genre inside out. In the the overbearing society viewed in 1984 Big Brother was everywhere and wanted to know everything. Here we have a society that wants to know nothing. In many ways this willful ignorance is even more chilling. It's certainly presented in such a way that you can't really condemn the people who keep it going. They don't know any better. Somehow that makes it even more problematic.

While I was reminded of 1984 at first, other passages had me recalling Logan's Run and even the movie Soylent Green.

I was actually surprised when the term love (the whole family at christmas scene)came up as the thing that the Giver disclosed but which the new reciever couldn't share with his family.

The concept of sameness is something that I'm now going to be conidering for months and the to some degree my perceptions
will never be the same.

I've sometimes considered what would make for the perfect book. Among the criteria that I've come up with are characters that I care about and an epiphany generating idea. This book has both of those criteria nailed.

It's been discussed that it's unclear whether Jonas lives or dies at the end of the book. The author says that she left this purposefully vague and yet, we do care. While either ending could still be construed as a happy ending, we really care about the characters by this time.

And yet either way the people of the community get memories back, no? And the results of that would certainly make for an interesting sequal but never as interesting as this initial book was.

In addition to the complex questions I'll now be debating about the joys of diversity and the sorrows associated with freedom I'll be wondering...What does the giver mean when he says that Rosemary is his daughter? Since all births are are sort of anonymous He might have been referring to raising her or maybe she's just his spiritual daughter. After all among the most precious things that we teach our children are our values, no?

If you haven't yet, you really should read this book. Simply reading it may not make you a better person, but honestly contemplating the questions it raises sure will.
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most people really liked this book, but personally I found this book to be quite boring,as well as a slow read. It is about this Boy named Jonas and his job is to recieve memories from this man called the Giver that was chosen for him at the age of twelve. In Jonas's "perfect society" there is no color, choices, music, or feelings. They also chose for you who your husband/wife will be. And they choose what jobs each person will do.

I would not recommend this book to anyone.
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excellent, easy read. one of my favorites.
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Interesting and thought provoking - but the end was odd. Possible spoiler but why does that one memory become his own?
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This is probably one of my all time favorite books. I read this book when I was in the 8th grade and marked it as my favorite. This book is a great fiction with a wonderful idea. A different world that is amazing.
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I first read this book when I was in middle school. I loved it then and I love it just as much after reading it 15 years later. This is a great book for both adults and children. It is an easy read but still manages to be thought provoking. I would definitely recommend.
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I love that the boys name is Jonas. I do not see that name too much so it was fun to readin the text. This book was very thought provoking. I was intrigued by the concepts of their sameness world and felt what the author was intended to portray, it is better to have choice, even if it is the wrong one. I had an idea what Releasing was but was still very shocked and saddened to read about one. The images in the book were very vivid.
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Newberry Medal Winner. Moving Story. Good Read!
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a must-read for all
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Good book-fast read.
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I think this is a great book. Many students read this in seventh grade as required reading. I don't know that most 7th graders can fully grasp the concepts but it is thought provoking.
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Hmmm...this book reminds me of the movie "The Village." It is very interesting.
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Perhaps I'm biased, because I just read 1984 not too long ago, but this book does remind me of 1984. I wouldn't be surprised if the author got inspired by 1984, either consciously or subconsciously. But again, she might have come up with it on her own. That this and 1984 belong in the same dystopian framework is fairly apparent: the orderly society, the all-imposing bureaucracy that dictates what you do and controls how you should behave, the lack of real emotion including love, hate, anger, longing, ... (Now, if you're a Buddist follower, you'd think that the lack of those emotions is not necessarily a bad thing, but that's a totally different topic).

What is more unique about this book (and make it a good read) is the calmness and nonchalance with which society seems to carry on. Unlike 1984, here there's no outwardly sinister characters or scheme. Society appear to have been designed for everyone's own good. Thus the malevolence (if one can call is that) is very subtle, almost like the breeze (that no longer exist in a climate-control society). Gradually one comes to really how chilling life really is behind the gentle and caring facade, and I give the author kudos for being able to do that in a relatively short book.

My reservations about the book is the lack of logical coherence. For example the setting: it's set in a futuristic society, but they're just a small part of the land? Their climate is controlled, the outside is not, but there's no apparent boundary? What do people do outside, why can't they just come over and visit (and cause upheaval in this society)? This advanced society has so many technological means, and yet they can't find a boy carrying a baby on bicycle? For months? And the two of them can survive months on the road, in the open, with nothing to eat and no tool to find food? I felt like in the rush to make a "cool" ending, the author kind of rushed a bit and didn't quite think through what would make sense. Granted, I know the plot is more important than the details, but I'd still prefer it to make sense than just force things on us and ask us to accept.

Btw I've also watched the movie version. Unlike other book-to-movie projects, for this I like the movie a great deal. They've managed to adapt very well, while also attempted to address some of the book's incoherence I talked about. In an effort to make the movie more exciting and less subtle, they've made the society and the Chief Leader a lot more sinister than in the book. It's all good though, it makes for a pretty compelling movie, while many of the original themes in the book are still retained. If you've read, I'd recommend the movie too.
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This is such a beautiful story -- very simple, yet very deep and thought-provoking. I was challenged and entertained, and I will keep this book as part of my permanent library!
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Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear or pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the Community.
When Jonas turns twelve he is singled out to receive special training from the Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now it's time for Jonas to receive the truth. There is no turning back.
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Amazing book! Awesome story line with a wonderful point!
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It's quickly clear why this modern fable has received the Newberry Medal.
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This book was suggested by my older son's teacher. I like the writer's writting style. Great book!
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I love this book! Wonderful story for any age.
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A middle school classic.
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I first came upon this book in the 5th grade, and while the content is a bit "out there" for some, I believe that this book should be a staple for all young students. This is one a very few books that made me question my own beliefs (at 5th grade!!). It also managed to pull a few tears from my eyes during a very sad section involving the treatment of twins. I would recommend this book to anyone, young and old alike.
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I loved this book when I first read it in 5th grade. It was one of the first books I feel in love with and that got me wanting to read. I think it's an excellent books that shows that one person can make a difference.
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It's not a Newbery Award Winner for nothing, folks. This story makes you think. Really think. About really deep stuff, like the right of human choice and the difference from right and wrong. That kind of deep stuff.

Here's the Summery:

"Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear or pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the Community.
When Jonas turns twelve he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now it's time for Jonas to receive the truth. There's no turning back."

Don't be fooled. Even though this is a 'children's' book, doesn't mean that it's not worth reading. It's seriously deep.
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Futuristic, Drama, Fiction, Horror, Story
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My son had to read this for his 7th grade class. It sounded so interesting that I had to read it too. It really makes you think about wanting a perfect world. I highly believe everyone should read this.
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Definitely my favorite book from my whole grade school reading experience. I'd almost say that despite the label of children's literature, this was the book that made me start loving fantasy and science fiction. It flows and twists and makes you re-think things you thought you knew already. Good read for most teens.
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One of my favorite books in high school.
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I really liked this book. I loved the way it was written and the story. I will definately read more books by Lois Lowry.
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Really good read. It's a young readers book, but an interesting story with a different perspective on the world.
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This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
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Very well written and imaginable book.
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fabulously, well-written story.
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Wonderful book. Recomended for pre-teens/teens. Has very thoughtful messages.
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This book is thought provoking. It does help you to appreciate the world that we live in and our ability to make choices a lot more.
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One of my favorite books. You wont regret reading it!
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I had read this in jr high, and till this day is one of the only books i can remember so much about it yet. A must read, no matter what age.
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I really enjoyed reading this book, gives you so much to think about and how we do things to make everyone even and the same but yet still have a desire to know. A really great read.
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The Giver is a facinating look at a Utopian society. Jonas's society believes choice and individuality are the root of all evil, so they simply do not allow either one. Read on to find out how Jonas learns he alone has the right to choice and perhaps a better life outside of his community.
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Great book. A must read.
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Very thought-provoking.
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excellent book for all ages
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I really liked this book.
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I also had to read this book in high school.
This is an amazing book. I really makes you think about somethings.
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Superb book, written at young age level, but a great read for all. A young boy questions the values of his utopian society.
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i thought that the giver was well rittin its about this kid in the distant future and how he was chose to be the giver like the town leader i recomend everyone to read this book
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I actual listened to this book on CD. It was so good. I would recommened it to anyone.
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Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no
war or tear or pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned
a role in the Community. When Jonas turns twelve he is singled out
to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now it's time for Jonas to receive the truth. There is no turning back.
memories of the true pain and pleasure of life
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Great book!
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One of my favorite all-time books!
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A John Newbery Medal book
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I could not put this book down!!! It was such an eye opener! It captured me and took me right through until I was shocked I had finished it. It was a cross between 1984 and Animal Farm. Very creative in writing and thinking!!!
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This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
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Interesting concept of a story... I liked he idea of the community, the way things were and I like that Jonas thought beyond that. It was a good book.Short but good.
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Imagine a grey community with rules and regulations....everything in order....even conversation so polite. There is no emotion, no feelings and no love...until a new receiver is named. The Giver and the Receiver strike like and love...different for both! Then colors and feelings arise which changes the way you see and hear things - people are not who you think, things you have been told are lies. So escape is the only way.........to what?
Freedom and feelings, emotions and where love is felt and music is heard for the first time.
I think of this as a government controlled society..everyone in their places doing what is expected of them but it's just routines with no substance of real life!!!!
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This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
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Good book
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it is a good book a real tear jerker has won a newberry medal . It has one crease
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I looooove this book! In this masterpiece of a writing, Lois Lowry spins a tale about a twelve year-old boy living in a community where there is no such thing as love or pain. What does he have to go through in order to discover the real world? The book is absolutely amazing, and I love Lowry's way of making every section end in a cliffhanger. Don't read this book before bedtime, because you won't be able to stop to put it down.
The one downside to this book, though, is the ending. It is so hard to write good book endings, and I think that is the only think lacking the magical Lowry touch.
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This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
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A futuristic story of a misguided utopia.
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This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
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i thought this book was "AWESOME"!!!! I think it is meant for tweens, but i found it very interesting, & it makes you rethink your world and your place in it!!!!
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powerful, touching...
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Jonas's world is perfect. everything is under control.There is no war or fear or pain.There are no choices.Every person is assigned a role in the community. When Jonas turns 12 he is singled out to received special training from the giver.The Giver holds all.Now it's time for Jonas to receive the truth and there is no turning back.
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My daughter told me about this one (she's 24) and I'm glad she did.
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Honestly, this is my number one all time favorite. It's not diificult to read at all and yet it is really significant and has deep meaning. It is a dystopia similar to Orwell's 1984 and it is fabulous.
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Not just for young readers.
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A classic - if you didn't read it as a child, it's never too late.
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Interesting.
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I wasn't sure I would enjoy this book when I first picked it up, but as it went on, and we learn more about what's going on in this society, I found it quite interesting. And a very quick read.
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This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
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YA novel of a deceptively benign dystopia, where no one knows want, but only so long as they do not question. When a young boy is chosen to receive the communal memories, banned from the general population, he sees both the glory and the pain which has been denied to him and the members of his community.
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There are too many loose ends in this book to make is a satisfying read for an adult. Personally, I found it vapid and wouldn't give it to a child because it lacks the kind of depth one would want to develop in a tween. Although I've read many good reviews of this book, I'm afraid it seems like a re-run of so many other stories.
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This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
reviewed The Giver on + 902 more book reviews
This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
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This book would be great if it wasn't such a blatant rip off of "Anthem" by Ayn Rand.
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Very good book.
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My favorite book of ALL time!
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I really loved this book. only problem I had with it was the ending. but I haven't read any others in the series so that is probably why. I must try to get them. and just found out they are making a movie of it so am MORE glad that I read it.
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I was actually dissapointed by this book. Even though the theme and concept of it is very interesting, I found the actualy story and writing too simple for my own tastes, and the ending a big *too* vague and open.
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Wonderful book!!
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This is Book 1 of The Giver Quartet.

I dont know why I have not read this book before now. I have passed it in the bookstore countless times and never so much as picked it up to read the back. Shame on me.

This is one of the most subtly chilling books I have read in a long time. In the same way that someone who is really angry is more frightening when they whisper than when they scream, this book conveyed alarming scenarios with the most gentle of deliveries. I dont know how Lowry managed to do it, to say so little and so much at the same time, and to do so in a way where teens and adults alike would find benefit in what she has written.

The Giver is a particular view into one seemingly perfect community a post-apocalyptic world. It provides endless fodder for book clubs, family conversations, term paper topics, and group discussions. It covers a breathtaking array of social, physical, philosophical, psychological, moral, and cultural themes, and will be remembered for all that it does say just as much as all that it does not. That, I think, is part of the beauty and mystery and fear of this novel: it allows your imagination to fill in the rest, and in most cases that is far more frightening than anything she could have written.

This is one of those books that you can read many times throughout your life and glean something new and meaningful from it with every reading. Dont be deceived by the simple styling of the plot or the fact that it is a quick read. This tiny tome packs quite a punch. It is at its best when taken slowly so that you can really THINK about what you are reading, to absorb all of the wider implications of what is being said. It certainly makes for a far scarier way to read the book, but it is one that I would recommend.

The ending is intentionally (if not frustratingly) ambiguous, but that is due in part, I believe, to Lowrys attempts to force the reader to continue to think for themselves rather than to have the story spoon fed to them in exacting detail. I understood the need for that particular ending, but still felt the need for closure. Then I discovered that there were 3 more books in this series. I promptly quit moping and started reading the next book.
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Just incredible; the whole trilogy is so worth the read!
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THis is my daughter's favorite book. We have three copies.
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Classic book. John Newbery Medal winner.
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There's a reason this story won the Newbery Medal. It's an AMAZING story and I honestly loved it! In short, this book is brilliant --> perfection in 179 pages! The writing is beautiful, the overall story is so heart-breaking, and there are well-developed characters I learned to love.
The worst part of holding the memories is not the pain. It's the loneliness of it. Memories need to be shared.
THE PLOT
The Giver
is one of the most original and creative books I've ever read
, and each page soaked me in more and more! There were so many unpredictable plot twists! Every time I thought I knew something, Lowry proved me wrong with another one of her spectacular twists!
        This book is unlike everything I've ever read before. It's brilliant and creative, and it breathes such fresh air into the dystopian genre.
        Our story follows 12-year-old Jonas. He lives in a Community where everything is "perfect." There is no war, no pain, no suffering, no choices. At the age of twelve, each member of the Community is assigned a job to help keep everything run smoothly. When Jonas is assigned his role, he is singled out to meet the Giver - an old, wise man who has memories of how life used to be - painful, pleasureful, free. While seeing these memories, Jonas begins to wonder if his society is as "perfect" as it seems...

THE WRITING
Lowry's writing is breath-takingly beautiful! The way she is able to get her words to flow across the pages so eloquently and elegantly is beyond me! It's simply stunning, and it's hard not to admire her simple yet complex writing style.
        Some reviewers might argue that the writing is too simplistic. And I agree. The writing is simplistic, but beautifully so. It could easily be read by a 10-year-old, yet it would take a teenager to actually understand the themes in the writing. In short, the writing in the book may seem simple, but the themes and concepts in the book are deep. As in seriously deep.

The pacing is brilliant as well - it's fast, but not too fast. It helps create such an amazing aura of peace - like a dip into the Community itself. It's quite mysterious, urgent and suspenseful at times, but the pacing is a great help in those areas as well.

Oh, the ending! (Not going to give anything away, but this ending was really a dazzler!) The Giver ended in such a way that I was yearning for more. I'm usually not very fond of cliff-hangers, but since this is a book in a series, I'm interested in seeing how Lowry finishes up the story she started.

THE CHARACTERS

The Giver features a small but powerful cast of characters - each of whom are developed so wonderfully and realistically.

        The Giver has every character you can imagine - from the old, wise Giver to the kind, naïve Jonas to the humorous, zestful Asher. The characters in the story all show every angle of human nature - good and bad; yet they all hint at being their own individual person, straining to be free in a "Same" society.
        Each character has a phenomenal amount of depth that it feels like you actually know them personally. I really got attached to Jonas; and I truly felt his pain, his longing, his confusion. It was beautiful; I've never had such a deep emotional connection with a character like this - and I believe it's truly a gifted author who is able to do this!

THE WORLD-BUILDING & DYSTOPIA
In terms of the world-building and dystopian elements of the story, they were superb and extraordinarily well done.

        After finishing the story (and crying because of the huge emotional impact it had on me), I couldn't think of one thing that confused me in terms of world-building and dystopian elements.
        Everything is well-explained, leaving the reader with no unanswered questions or concerns. (Besides, of course, what happens to Gabe and Jonas following the end of the story.
        I was so impressed that The Giver was not one of those books that failed simply because of some poor world-building, much like the poorly edited dystopias being released currently.

And yet what I liked most about The Giver was that it made me think. We so often take for granted everything we have - not only physically, but emotionally as well. Lowry raises an interesting point when she asks if you'd rather have..
... a perfect world that has no pain, suffering or war - yet no colors or choices or emotions

or

an imperfect world with pain and suffering; yet the opportunity to make your own choices, to follow your own destiny.
It's an issue that made me truly think deeply; deeper than I've thought in such a long time, and just for that I name The Giver as one of my all-time favorite books.

I have been a fan of Lois Lowry's writing since I read her breath-taking historical fiction novel [book:Number the Stars|47281]. And, luckily, she does nothing but impress me once again, and I will definitely be reading more of her books.
        It bears repeating that The Giver was AMAZING! Perfection in 179 pages. I'd highly recommend this to anyone who hasn't read it before. It will truly change your life! It's definitely one of the few books that I believe people should read at least once in their lives.

As for me, I can't wait to read the rest of the "quartet!"

A well-earned 5 out of 5 red sleds!
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i never put this book down
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I wish I had never read this book and would not recommend anyone else read the book-- it was not harmless and the ideas are very dangerous/troubling. This book should not have received the Newberry Medal Award or be selected for community reads! Also, the author is not willing to discuss the book or the reasons she wrote the book at community presentations.
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Yearling Newbery award winner. "Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear or pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the community. When Jonas turns twelve he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now it's time for Jonas to receive th truth. There is no turning back.
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It was a fast read
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This book is my daughter's favorite book. At her suggestion and insistence, I read the book. I have read thousands of books in my life in every possible genre and can say unequivocally that this is the worst book that I have ever read. To say that I hated it would be an understatement. I don't know how such a book gets a Newberry Award, but I know now that such an award does not confer any real significance to the book. This is certainly not a book for children and should not be marketed as such.

If I could give it 0 stars (or less) I would.
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Jonas's world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear or pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the Community.
When jonas turns twelve he is singled out to recieve special training from the giver. The giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now it's time for jonas to receive the truth. ther is no turning back.
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My son had to read this book for school.
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I can't believe this is a children's book that is recommended for students to read! It is ghastly! It starts out by sucking you into a mystery that you just can't figure out what is going on but with the ending you are left with a "WHAT?". My children were shocked to find out one of the main characters is a baby killer. What makes this book great? The others comment about the similiarities to the movie The Village but at least that movie has some good to it and has a message that doesn't leave you hanging!
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Again, another award winning book that sucks. If you're into Grandma & Grandpa getting put down like an old dog or cat and flushed down a tube - then this book is for you! Like the idea of your youngster bathing naked old people and want to read about hormonal changes with your 4th grader? Again, this is your book. If not, stay far, far away.