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Topic: Good or Favorite Gardening Books

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Subject: Good or Favorite Gardening Books
Date Posted: 3/6/2008 9:39 AM ET
Member Since: 9/23/2006
Posts: 6,362
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I start these threads and hope someone else will add to them some day!

Here is a link to some regional landscaping books by Creative Homeowner.  After I posted that Mountain Laurel got big, I found my book lying around and there are some smaller hybrids of Mountain Laurel, although they still sounded big to me :)  It also mention boxwood being having a distinct fragrance (why don't they say what kind of fragrance?). 

I have both the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast because we seemed to be too cold for many of the Mid-Atlantic suggestions.  Other than that, they are very similar.  The good things about these is that they recommend plants for your general area and they have suggested plantings, including varieties. 

The bad thing is that you have to visualize them because they are just those colored sketches.  They are geared mostly for people who live on lots - with curbs, sidewalks, patios - normal things, I suppose. 

There are sections on preparing the beds and sections with photos and information on the recommended plants.  I'd take their varieties as suggestions, since some times newer varieties come out or problems develop with one that was previously recommended.  However, these are useful books if you don't have much help in planning things for your area or a certain location.  I would imagine you could find them at a reduced cost somewhere else.  Creative Homeowner Landscaping

Date Posted: 3/8/2008 1:54 PM ET
Member Since: 12/7/2007
Posts: 215
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Sunset's Western Garden book is my favorite & have had to replace it I have used it so often! I carry it with me everywhere; it gives all kinds of information on plants; sun; shade; water; etc; all of their books are extremely informative & I don't think you can go wrong with them! Mountain Laurel is beautiful; don't repeat DO NOT BE AFRAID to prune! & prune hard! keep it in bounds of what you would like it to be; the plants actually come back more beautiful & love you for it! They think you are the beautican & they are being pampered! We have a master gardener's fair every single year here at the fair grounds & people from everywhere bring in plants & trees not found normally everywhere; outstanding & amazing! Can even find planters there at a fraction of the cost! Of course some are way expensive but oodles of them are not! Oh, the finds! I just called my sister to find out when it will be this year & it is the 4th weekend in April; sun is out & beautiful & warm! I want to go find some plants today! And yes, we will have snow & frost & rains but pansys can take snow & frost & rain! Yes! Off to find some!

Subject: gardening books etc.
Date Posted: 4/5/2008 4:27 PM ET
Member Since: 9/24/2007
Posts: 101
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I am a landscaper by profession.  I do both design work and installation of landscaping for new houses and redo of established landscapes.  I have a large library of books.  Here's a list of some of the ones I have:  Southern Living's ' Garden Book'; Sunset's 'Western Garden Book'; Southern Living 'Landscape Book'; The Complete Garden Flower Book'.  I could go on and on but if you see some you like, pick them up, go through them and see if you like the information they have.  You can never have too many gardening books.

Date Posted: 4/7/2008 11:23 AM ET
Member Since: 10/13/2005
Posts: 2,168
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Couldn't live without Burpee's Complete Gardener book. It's my reliable "go to" gardening book.

Date Posted: 4/7/2008 8:08 PM ET
Member Since: 9/23/2006
Posts: 6,362
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This is a quote from another website: 

If you don't have the big bucks for the 1980 version of the New York Botanical Garden Illustrated Encyclopedia of Horticulture, check used book stores for the earlier version of T. H. Everett's 18-volume set of New Illustrated Encyclopedia of Gardening (Greystone Press, 1967). It covers just about any gardening subject. 

I got the Greystone encyclopedia on one of those one-volume-at-a-time deals sometime after I got married and have been dragging all 18 vols. around ever since. It's so old that I've often debated whether it was worth keeping; however, I find myself referring to it often enough that I would recommend it if you find it at a sale or thirft shop and have the space.  I only use the 15 alphabetical volumes.  The other 3 are more or less filler for me.

Subject: gardening book
Date Posted: 4/8/2008 9:47 AM ET
Member Since: 3/12/2007
Posts: 472
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I recently bought a copy of The VIctory Garden Companion and it is awesome, I have used it several times already in planning my  plantings this spring.  I got it at Food Lion Grocery Store in the bargain book bin for just a couple of bucks but now I will not part with it.  I noticed it is wishlisted.

Date Posted: 4/24/2008 3:39 AM ET
Member Since: 12/7/2007
Posts: 215
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There are just so many different kinds of books for different items: i used to have some wonderful ones on water gardening which I did on a small scale at the time; the neighbor next door moved & left behind her childs wading pool; i simply cleaned; went to nursery & got pond plants & mosquito fish; plunked some plants that love water in it & it was off & running! Had to get herb books cuz they are so neat; then had to get get some English garden books; they are quite easy to collect all kinds of them! But they are so nice to just look & get ideas from & read of the history of plants, look at the various kinds of roses; I had never even heard of English roses til a friend of a friend said she adored them; then I went looking for them; & discovered the difference between floribunda roses (which I adore far more than the teas); the floribunda's have multiple buds on them & the name means abundance of flowers; all I have ever known about really was the teas; and I am probably a fanatic about trees. I adore them; I buy them, I plant them; I give them to folks. I buy small & let grow in containers; I buy living trees for Christmas etc. The Sunset Garden Book of several years ago was outstanding as it gave both common name for plant as well as botanical name. They no longer have done this is subsequent books so i have to go looking for an older one that does again!

Date Posted: 4/24/2008 12:00 PM ET
Member Since: 9/23/2006
Posts: 6,362
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You have to watch those English garden books though!  Most of the US isn't much like England but they sure are pretty :) 

We have so many Jap. beetles that I don't mess with roses to amount to anything.  Well, we have a few minis.  I bought a book just on salvias since they seem to live.  That's my criteria - not fussy, lives.

Subject: The Harmonious Garden: Color, Form and Texture; Catherine Ziegler
Date Posted: 5/30/2008 9:10 AM ET
Member Since: 9/23/2006
Posts: 6,362
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I've had this book for quite awhile but just opened it the other night.  It's not a general book but I like it.  It shows many small photos taken from real gardens and then analyzes how the plants complement each other with the colors and textures. 

It seems very useful for "what should I put with my hosta?" or getting other ideas for combining plantings.  The sections shown aren't overwhelming (they aren't 10' deep borders) and generally use 2 to 5 different plants and give the foliage and flowering time.

This is a keeper.

Date Posted: 5/30/2008 9:08 PM ET
Member Since: 1/29/2007
Posts: 3,365
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The only garden book I use regularly is Neal Sperry's Complete Guide to Texas Gardening http://www.paperbackswap.com/book/details/9780878337996-Neil+Sperrys+Complete+Guide+to+Texas+Gardening

I've been using it as a reference for years and it's the best I've found for advice on gardening in my area.



Last Edited on: 5/30/08 9:08 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 6/2/2008 11:03 PM ET
Member Since: 8/11/2006
Posts: 6,597
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Love, love, love Passalong Plants by Steve Bender and Felder Rushing. Coming in a close second and third are The Southern Heirloom Garden by William C. Welch and Gardening with Native Plants of the South by Sally Wasowski.



Last Edited on: 6/2/08 11:05 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 6/3/2008 5:47 PM ET
Member Since: 12/28/2005
Posts: 94
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Got my gardening reference library on the cheap thanks to PBS and the FOL books sales. :)

-The Complete Guide to Gardening and Landscaping - Time-Life Books (my 'ole reliable)

-Natural Landscaping:  Gardening with Nature to Create a Backyard Paradise by Sally Roth

-Attracting Butterflies and Hummingbirds to your Backyard by Sally Roth

-Taylors Guide To _______ (Shrubs, Perennials, Annuals, Fruits & Berries, Heirloom Vegetables, Trees, Roses...)

-Native Trees, Shrubs, and Vines:  A Guide to Using, Growing, and Propagating North American Woody Plants by William Cullina

-Wildflowers by William Cullina

-Ortho Gardening books

Subject: Parting with Books
Date Posted: 6/16/2008 1:40 PM ET
Member Since: 9/23/2006
Posts: 6,362
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If I send out a book with pretty photos of gardens or how-tos, I always look at it and think I should have kept it and used it, lol.  Of course, I didn't, which is why I am parting with it.

One had been sitting on my "shelf" forever and was suddenly requested.  It does have some very nice things in it.  (Probably why I bought it in the first place.)  Sometimes I am a ding-dong.  Still, the stone trough rock garden and the circular dial herb garden are quite nice.  There was an auction with a stone watering trough last year and I knew I wanted it for something!  I didn't go though.  I hope the new owner enjoys it - maybe they will make a lavender hedge which always looks so nice but wouldn't be hardy here.

Date Posted: 7/29/2008 11:04 AM ET
Member Since: 9/24/2007
Posts: 649
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I have many garden/landscaping books & mags. But my all time fav is GardenGate.

Check out www.gardengatemagazine.com

Date Posted: 7/29/2008 5:24 PM ET
Member Since: 9/23/2006
Posts: 6,362
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Thanks, Sharon.  I checked and they'd sent me a free issue (wasn't sure if that was the right one).  It looked good but I've never looked at it, which makes me wonder, lol.  Anyway, it's great to know that it is a good magazine. 

Date Posted: 10/10/2008 5:47 AM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
Posts: 15,384
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One of my favorites is Allergy Free Gardening by Tom Ogren.  You need a plant guide to go with it, like Sunset.  But it has saved me from plants with pollen under the bedroom window.  Just that is worth the book's weight in gold.  Sleeping much better.

Date Posted: 11/5/2008 10:17 AM ET
Member Since: 12/28/2005
Posts: 94
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I'm wintersowing some seeds and got to thinking about propagating plants from cuttings - something I've never given much thought to.  I checked out two books from my library on propagating, Making More Plants:  The Science, Art, and Joy of Propagation by Ken Druse and  The American Horticultural Society:  Plant Propagation.  I really liked the American Horticultural Society's Plant Propagation book.  Druse's book, although a very enjoyable read, lacked reasoning behind many of the step-by-step instructions.  I didn't feel I understood many of the "why's" behind what he was saying.  Absolutely loved the American Horticultural Society propagation book and I've now many pots on the back deck with cuttings in them....hoping they'll have grown roots by mid-spring or so.



Last Edited on: 11/6/08 9:17 AM ET - Total times edited: 1