Book Reviews of Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5)

Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5)
Grail - Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5
Author: Stephen R. Lawhead
ISBN-13: 9780380781041
ISBN-10: 0380781042
Publication Date: 6/1/1998
Pages: 400
Rating:
  • Currently 3.6/5 Stars.
 46

3.6 stars, based on 46 ratings
Publisher: Eos
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

8 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5) on + 86 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
Told from the point of view of Gwalchavad (Galahad), this take on King Arthur is filled with adventure, magic and sorcery, betrayal, love and romance. It is everything that a King Arthur story should be.
reviewed Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5) on + 12 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 1
This is one the best spins on the Arthurian tale that I have read. Instead of being total fantasy..Lawhead draws you in from another perspective that makes the story more real and plausible.
reviewed Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5) on + 902 more book reviews
This is book five of The Pendragon Cycle.

This book picks up seamlessly where 'Pendragon' left off and is narrated entirely by Bedwyr. This book describes Arthur's obsession with the Holy Grail and his commitment to making the Grail the cornerstone of the fledgling Summer Kingdom.

The first third of the book describes the preparation leading up to the official inauguration of the Summer Kingdom. The final two thirds describe a long and tortured adventure pitting the virtue of the Summer Kingdom and its allies against the evil of the Queen of Air and Darkness and her minions.

The tone of this book was very similar to Lawhead's 'The Endless Knot' from The Song of Albion trilogy. This is a darker, more claustrophobic book that places the characters far from home on a journey within dangerous and foreboding surroundings.

I found this book to be the fastest read of the entire series. Perhaps it was because it was less tedious, less battle-laden, and more adventure focused. It felt different than the other books and I found the change of pace and perspective to be refreshing.

As the last book in the series (not counting 'Avalon') I found the ending to be rather anti-climactic since the real ending to the series was told two books ago in 'Arthur'. When 'Grail' ends, you are simply told the ending to that particular adventure and are denied any additional sense of closure for all of the still-unanswered questions that the series produced.

As a whole, the series was a worthwhile read (although slow and tedious at times) and I really enjoyed reading about a more noble and Celtic Arthur whose story did succumb to the typical Lancelot-and-Guenevere affair and other worn out Arthurian cliches.
reviewed Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5) on + 2 more book reviews
This book followed along with the previous volumes in the story. For me the Grail was short of the mark in tying the rest of the ledgend together. Over simplified in its telling.
reviewed Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5) on + 883 more book reviews
Seven years of war with the Saecens are followed by an Vandali invasion while the country reels from drought and plague. Arthur's tired host defeats the Vandali but Arthur is seriously injured. The wounds are great and he is taken to Ynys Avallach where Charis, a queen of the fair folk resides. It is hoped that her nursing skill may help him. There a miracle occurs and Arthur survives. That miracle is the Grail brought from its hiding place to heal the Pendragon. Arthur realizes that the Grail is a holy relic that could bring peace and health to Britain and builds a great shrine for it. And, as Arthur has predicted friends and enemy alike come to view and be healed by the Grail.

Meanwhile, Morgian schemes to lure Arthur's champion, Llenlleawg, to become her spy and help bring about the fall of the Pendragon, his queen, Gwenhwyvar, and Myrddin, his bard and counselor. Her goal is to destroy all of Britain and kill the three. Her minions steal the Grail, murdering both guardians and pilgrims in the process. Knowing that his arrogance was the root of this problem, Arthur falls into a deep depression. Myrddin at last is able to bring Athur to his senses and the host pursues Morgians's followers in the hope of recovering the Grail.

The final battle occurs in a place of Morgian's choosing, Llyonesse, where her powers are strongest. Arthur and his host have no recourse but to take up the challenge. Thus begins the major action of the tale as Arthur and his men travel through Llyonesse where Morgian uses her evil magic to raise dead warriors, beasts and create horrible illusions to defeat the host.

For me, the first part of the book seemed to be disjointed and to drag an but when the Grail is stolen, the author seems to hit his stride and the story flows rapidly to the end. From that point, I could not put the book aside unitl I finished. The narrator is Gwalchavad, Lord of Orcady, with parts prefaced by the words and thoughts of Morgian, the Queen of Air and Darkness. All in all, the book is worth your time!
reviewed Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5) on + 902 more book reviews
This is book five of The Pendragon Cycle.

This book picks up seamlessly where 'Pendragon' left off and is narrated entirely by Bedwyr. This book describes Arthur's obsession with the Holy Grail and his commitment to making the Grail the cornerstone of the fledgling Summer Kingdom.

The first third of the book describes the preparation leading up to the official inauguration of the Summer Kingdom. The final two thirds describe a long and tortured adventure pitting the virtue of the Summer Kingdom and its allies against the evil of the Queen of Air and Darkness and her minions.

The tone of this book was very similar to Lawhead's 'The Endless Knot' from The Song of Albion trilogy. This is a darker, more claustrophobic book that places the characters far from home on a journey within dangerous and foreboding surroundings.

I found this book to be the fastest read of the entire series. Perhaps it was because it was less tedious, less battle-laden, and more adventure focused. It felt different than the other books and I found the change of pace and perspective to be refreshing.

As the last book in the series (not counting 'Avalon') I found the ending to be rather anti-climactic since the real ending to the series was told two books ago in 'Arthur'. When 'Grail' ends, you are simply told the ending to that particular adventure and are denied any additional sense of closure for all of the still-unanswered questions that the series produced.

As a whole, the series was a worthwhile read (although slow and tedious at times) and I really enjoyed reading about a more noble and Celtic Arthur whose story did succumb to the typical Lancelot-and-Guenevere affair and other worn out Arthurian cliches.
reviewed Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5) on + 45 more book reviews
Not bad. Part of the Talisen, Merlin, Arthur series.
reviewed Grail (Pendragon Cycle, Bk 5) on + 902 more book reviews
This is book five of The Pendragon Cycle.

This book picks up seamlessly where 'Pendragon' left off and is narrated entirely by Bedwyr. This book describes Arthur's obsession with the Holy Grail and his commitment to making the Grail the cornerstone of the fledgling Summer Kingdom.

The first third of the book describes the preparation leading up to the official inauguration of the Summer Kingdom. The final two thirds describe a long and tortured adventure pitting the virtue of the Summer Kingdom and its allies against the evil of the Queen of Air and Darkness and her minions.

The tone of this book was very similar to Lawhead's 'The Endless Knot' from The Song of Albion trilogy. This is a darker, more claustrophobic book that places the characters far from home on a journey within dangerous and foreboding surroundings.

I found this book to be the fastest read of the entire series. Perhaps it was because it was less tedious, less battle-laden, and more adventure focused. It felt different than the other books and I found the change of pace and perspective to be refreshing.

As the last book in the series (not counting 'Avalon') I found the ending to be rather anti-climactic since the real ending to the series was told two books ago in 'Arthur'. When 'Grail' ends, you are simply told the ending to that particular adventure and are denied any additional sense of closure for all of the still-unanswered questions that the series produced.

As a whole, the series was a worthwhile read (although slow and tedious at times) and I really enjoyed reading about a more noble and Celtic Arthur whose story did succumb to the typical Lancelot-and-Guenevere affair and other worn out Arthurian cliches.