Book Reviews of The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun

The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun
The Heavenly Man The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun
Author: Paul Hattaway
ISBN-13: 9780825462078
ISBN-10: 082546207X
Publication Date: 2/1/2003
Pages: 352
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 31

4.1 stars, based on 31 ratings
Publisher: Monarch Books
Book Type: Paperback
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

7 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun on + 29 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 4
When Mao removed the more than 10,000 protestant missionaries out of China in the late 40s, most feared that would be the end of Christianity there; but such was not the case. In spite of continued persecution, the church has grown at a staggering rate and it is now estimated that as many as 130 million may have converted. 'Heavenly Man' is about one pastor, Brother Yun, who endured unspeakable hardships for his faith, while seeing God work in remarkable, often miraculous ways. His story is but one of many of those who suffered greatly under this totalitarian regime and the amazing strength that endures today in the "back to Jerusalem" movement. One missionary called it "required reading" for anyone wishing to go to the mission field, because time has shown that greatest growth often comes out of great suffering.
reviewed The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun on + 275 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 3
Incredible book about the modern-day Church in China. Couldn't put it down. Highly recommended reading for every Christian.
reviewed The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun on + 10 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Reads like a modern day book of Acts. It's incredible to see what God's been up to in recent years in the largest closed country in the world. Amazing read!
reviewed The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun on + 3 more book reviews
This book describes in detail not only the sufferings that Brother Yun went through, but his ability to "embrace suffering as a friend." Miracles and visions are common place for this Chinese pastor. He believes in God's soverenty and lives out this belief. The Back to Jerusalem missionary movement is very dear to his heart. I recommend this book as a must for every serious Christian.
reviewed The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun on + 346 more book reviews
I adored this book in every way. Brother Yun tells how he and his family (and his wife) came to know Jesus and how God led Brother Yun to preach the gospel throughout China, leading him to much persecution, imprisonment, and torture all for standing on God's firm foundation. There were amazing Biblical truths woven throughout his testimony. I loved that he often spoke of wrongs he did in which God taught him great lessons through. I think all Christians, especially those who have a heart towards missions should read this.
reviewed The Heavenly Man: The Remarkable True Story of Chinese Christian Brother Yun on + 5 more book reviews
Life changing book!
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Ridiculously AWFUL book. I only read the first four chapters and had to stop. I'm a Christian, but this book is so off-the-charts ridiculous that words are hard to find to describe it.

In just the first four chapters, the author has numerous "visions" and one-on-one discussions with God and Christ, not to mention the constant "miracles" he describes in flowery language, all punctuated with ever-present exclamation points. It's like reading the transcript of a bad Southern-style tent revival. He manages to run several miles in the blink of an eye. He leaps over high walls. He becomes invisible to government authorities. His father is completely cured of cancer after one evening of prayer (and yet, mysteriously dies two years later... of what, the author doesn't say, oddly enough).

Books like this are why non-Christians and regular Christians think evangelicals are insane. Maybe this is someone's cup of tea, but it certainly isn't mine.