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Topic: Heavy books

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Subject: Heavy books
Date Posted: 4/22/2012 2:59 PM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2009
Posts: 277
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I am sure this subject has come up before, so there must be some official guidelines about heavy books. I have many hardcovers that I have not posted

to my bookshelf because 1 credit doesn't seem adequate recompense for shipping a book that weighs over one pound, or sometimes over 2 pounds. 

So I was wondering, if  I do put these books on my bookshelf, is it ok to ask for 2 credits when a person requests a heavy book?

Date Posted: 4/22/2012 3:16 PM ET
Member Since: 5/15/2005
Posts: 1,328
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We're not allowed to ask for more than one credit for hardcovers. I don't buy or request a lot of hardcovers but when I do, I usually repost them. I figure I get a few and send a few so it all evens out, and it's usually only a little more for a two pound book than for a one pound book. But if I have a book that's really heavy, I usually don't post it here. If you have wishlisted hardcovers, you can try listing them on the multiple wishlist book threads in the Book Bazaar Forum and asking for multiple requests to help save on postage.

Date Posted: 4/22/2012 3:27 PM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2009
Posts: 277
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It is $2.47 to send a book media mail that weighs over 6 ounces and not over 1 pound. That may not seem like a lot to you, but it is a lot to me.  The next rate is $2.89. That's almost $3.00. That's a lot of money to someone who can remember when a loaf of bread cost 25 cents.

Date Posted: 4/22/2012 3:29 PM ET
Member Since: 5/15/2005
Posts: 1,328
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You asked, I took the time to answer. Sorry you didn't like my response.

Date Posted: 4/22/2012 3:36 PM ET
Member Since: 8/19/2007
Posts: 4,256
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You can also look at it this way - if it's WLed you will make someone happy, and someday you might need/want a heavy book and will be grateful/happy that someone posted it.  It usually all works out in the end, but if you can't afford to ship a heavier book, you don' have to.  The nice thing is we don't have to post books unless we want to.  I have a couple of heavy WLed books, and I've tried doing the multiples in the Book Bazaar with no luck, so they sit.  One of these days I'll bite the bullet and post them.  Take care and good luck. Pat

Date Posted: 4/22/2012 4:09 PM ET
Member Since: 3/25/2009
Posts: 277
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I didn't sak you for your opinion on whether it was a lot of money or not.

Date Posted: 4/22/2012 4:48 PM ET
Member Since: 12/31/2009
Posts: 3,995
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Under 1 lb. 2.47

Under 2 lbs. 2.89

If one credit is worth 2.47, then two credits are worth 4.94.

Asking for two credits (a value of almost 5.00) for a book that costs under 3.00 to mail doesn't add up.

The extra 42 cents needed to mail a book that's over 1 lb. may be dear to you, but it's no even close to the value of an extra credit.

One book = one credit. If you want to keep your postage costs to a minimum, it makes sense to stick to posting mass market paperbacks.



Last Edited on: 4/22/12 4:56 PM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 4/22/2012 5:35 PM ET
Member Since: 10/26/2008
Posts: 9,884
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One book = one credit. If you want to keep your postage costs to a minimum, it makes sense to stick to posting mass market paperbacks.

Or you could do as lsressler said and 

you can try listing them on the multiple wishlist book threads in the Book Bazaar Forum and asking for multiple requests to help save on postage.

Date Posted: 4/22/2012 7:19 PM ET
Member Since: 1/17/2009
Posts: 9,774
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Well, you can look at it this way too. If you like to request hardcovers, then mailing them out seems fair. You can request as many hardcovers as you want for one credit each, too. So it is not just the people that you are sending books to, that are receiving some kind of advantage, if you request hardcovers in return, you are getting the same benefit.
Date Posted: 4/22/2012 10:59 PM ET
Member Since: 8/18/2005
Posts: 7,977
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Here's the official word on heavy books. So don't ask for more than one credit for one book. It'll just get you turned down for trades and in trouble with the people that run the site.

Like others have suggested, either don't list them for trade, or when you do trade them out make sure to ask for a Hardback book in return if it makes you feel it's more fair.

Here.

Why aren't hardcover books 2 credits each?

On PBS all bound books are created equal. paperback and hardcover books of all types are worth one credit each. audio books are worth two credits each. We currently have no plans to change the "pricing structure".

  • Yes, hardcovers can be more expensive to send
    • they are generally larger and heavier than paperbacks
    • but some paperbacks are larger/heavier than some hardbacks.
  • The complexity of pro-rating book "cost" by weight would complicate what we want to be a simple process.
    • We think ease of swapping is of paramount importance.
  • If you want to receive a hardcover in return for each hardcover you send out:
    • You can always limit your requests to hardcovers only.
    • That way, you will not be spending more in postage than the senders spend to send you the books you want.

As far as we are concerned, a book is a book! A book that you no longer want is swapped for a book you want--it's all good!

J
Date Posted: 4/22/2012 11:47 PM ET
Member Since: 3/23/2007
Posts: 2,910
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I didn't sak you for your opinion on whether it was a lot of money or not.

Your responses are very rude to the people who kindly answered your question. 

Date Posted: 4/22/2012 11:47 PM ET
Member Since: 10/22/2009
Posts: 1,452
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I mail a lot of hardcovers, but I also request a lot of hardcovers, so for me I feel it evens out in the long run. If all I ordered were paperbacks, I might not be so willing to post hardcovers, but I'm glad there are quite a few people who do, since I really prefer reading them!
Date Posted: 4/23/2012 12:12 AM ET
Member Since: 8/16/2007
Posts: 15,187
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you can try listing them on the multiple wishlist book threads in the Book Bazaar Forum and asking for multiple requests to help save on postage.

Only if they are currently wish listed.

Cindy posted the official rules from the Help Center that state it can't be done. Doing so would get your account suspended.  If you feel the extra 32-53 cents is not worth the credit for you, then don't post the hardcovers. Some people chose not to. But as others have pointed out, many of us feel that since we request hardcovers, its fair to spend that little extra to send them too.

Date Posted: 4/23/2012 8:20 AM ET
Member Since: 8/10/2005
Posts: 4,599
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Bottom line--no you cannot ask for more than one credit for a book. Neither can someone requesting a book that only weighs 4 ounces ask you to only charge half a credit. PBS operates on "one book = one credit" regardless of size or weight. Only audiobooks are 2 credits.

As others have said, if an extra half-dollar to mail a heavier book is outside your budget, then it's very simple: DO NOT POST THEM. Take them to a used book store to sell or trade. I myself send hardcovers all the time, but I also request hardcovers all the time, so it all evens out in the end.

Cheryl

Date Posted: 4/23/2012 8:27 AM ET
Member Since: 12/23/2005
Posts: 3,005
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Thanks J for saying what needed to be said.
Date Posted: 4/23/2012 9:45 AM ET
Member Since: 7/19/2008
Posts: 15,423
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Also, PBS really frowns on it if you post the hardcovers and then refuse to send them when the person ordering does not order multiples. My theory is similar to others, you need to balance the weight of what you order with what you send. So you feel it is balanced.
Date Posted: 4/23/2012 10:16 AM ET
Member Since: 8/23/2007
Posts: 26,510
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$3.00  is still cheaper than the cost of a new mass market paperback even if that's what you used the credit for here. 

Heck it's cheaper than a used one from my local used book store. 

It's cheaper than an ebook from the big publishing houses and many of the small ones.

The tax right-off for donating them will be next to nothing.

The fees to sell them on Ebay or AMazon will probably eat up any profict made.

If you don't like that they're only 1 credit then don't post them.  But don't complain when others take the same view and WL lines for hardcovers move more slowly. 

Date Posted: 4/23/2012 11:04 AM ET
Member Since: 8/30/2008
Posts: 2,207
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I remember when bread was around $.25, too.

I was going to comment but it isn't worth my own mental aggravation and everyone has beautifully said what I was thinking.

yes J.

edited to correct spelling

 



Last Edited on: 4/23/12 11:04 AM ET - Total times edited: 1
Date Posted: 5/4/2012 9:15 AM ET
Member Since: 3/5/2010
Posts: 446
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One thing you can do is post heavy books on amazon.com, they caclulate shipping costs. You could sell the books for .01 cents plus the cost of shipping.

That is if anyone wants them and you just want to get rid of them.

Date Posted: 5/4/2012 1:15 PM ET
Member Since: 8/26/2006
Posts: 9,333
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The help center also says this:

Can I offer/ask more credits (more than PBS 'price') for a book?

No.

  • A bound book "costs" 1 credit at PBS (no exceptions)

  • An audiobook "costs" 2 credits at PBS 

    • some "children's-length" audiocassette items cost 1 credit each

Offering to "pay" (or asking a requestor to "pay"--see below) more than "PBS price" for a book is not permitted. 

Why?

  • If the book is Wishlisted, offering more than the PBS "price" for the book may allow members to leapfrog over others in the Wish List for the book. This obviously is not fair.
  • Even if the book is not Wish Listed, a "free market" system could lead to "bidding" for a book, and auctions are NOT permitted on PBS.
  • One reason is that auctions are subject to state laws, and as PBS members belong to various states, this could be illegal.
  • The other reason is that we want all members to have a fair chance to get books on PBS.  Pitting those who have lots of credits to spare against those who don't have a lot of credits at the time goes against the very spirit of PBS--the fair sharing of books. Everybody equal.

Asking for more than "PBS price" for a book is considered bookselling

  • Bookselling is not permitted at PBS
  • If you feel that your book is too valuable (or too costly to ship) to be swapped for "PBS price", you should not Post it here.
  • If this is a matter of postage cost (your book is heavy), remember that you can also request a "heavy" book with the credit you get for sending yours--so it all evens out.

 

Subject: Hilarious
Date Posted: 9/8/2012 10:13 PM ET
Member Since: 9/6/2012
Posts: 2
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Am planning to mail someone a book that is 6.6 lbs because I don't need it taking up room on my bookshelf...

Barb S. (okbye) - ,
Date Posted: 9/8/2012 10:33 PM ET
Member Since: 3/14/2011
Posts: 5,767
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Wow, that's a heck of a book. 

Date Posted: 9/8/2012 10:58 PM ET
Member Since: 2/19/2009
Posts: 439
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I once mailed out a heavy, new, Better Homes & Gardens interior decorating book - it cost around $5 for me to mail and I almost regretted that I posted it, but sent it out anyway. I didn't even get a thank you when it was received. I was a bit offended by that. I don't post those kinds of books any more. I put them on Booksfreeswap because there the requestor pays the postage.

Date Posted: 9/8/2012 11:14 PM ET
Member Since: 9/22/2010
Posts: 3,059
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That's a lot of money to someone who can remember when a loaf of bread cost 25 cents.

Sounds like my mother. She says things are sooo more expensive today. Not so. Inflation often makes things cheaper.

For example, in 1982, the average price of gas adjusted for inflation up through 2005 would have been $2.82.  This from an article in Time magazine. In 2005, I paid less than $2.82 a gallon for gas. This meant that gas in 2005 cost less then it did in 1982.

Let's take your 25 cents for bread example and go to the Measuring Worth Web site. Plugging in 25 cents in the upper right and selecting 1970 as the year bread costs 25 cents, and plugging in 2010 for the current year (latest year data is available), your 25 cent loaf of bread would have cost between $1.39 and $3.50 (adjusted for inflation), depending upon the type of measurement of worth you select.

Someone just requested a paperback from me that cost me $0.75 in 1969. Plugging that amount in yields a comparative cost of $3.60 to $11.10 in 2010, depending upon the type of measurement of worth.

This is a fun site to use when people complain about the cost of things.



Last Edited on: 9/8/12 11:21 PM ET - Total times edited: 5
Date Posted: 9/8/2012 11:53 PM ET
Member Since: 12/28/2006
Posts: 14,177
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For many people Thomas (esp. those on a fixed income) the income hasn't increased at the same pace as the cost of consumer goods. 

One good example, college education used to cost a whole lot less of a percentage of the median income.  Regardless of creative accounting practices, I know this for a fact because our DD recently graduated from the same college as my SIL (25 years apart).  No way could that cost be paid by the same method today (1/3 parent, 1/3 scholarship, and 1/3 waitressing a couple days a week at Denny's).

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