Book Reviews of Hero

Hero
Hero
Author: Perry Moore
ISBN-13: 9781423101956
ISBN-10: 1423101952
Publication Date: 9/1/2007
Pages: 432
Reading Level: Young Adult
Rating:
  • Currently 4.1/5 Stars.
 33

4.1 stars, based on 33 ratings
Publisher: Hyperion
Book Type: Hardcover
Reviews: Amazon | Write a Review

4 Book Reviews submitted by our Members...sorted by voted most helpful

reviewed Hero on + 279 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
This is a good and easy read. The story line is familiar: a son who thinks his father doesn't understand him, a mom who bugged out early on for reasons unknown. And i'll admit there are a few plot holes-- just a few. However I think this book poses a very interesting question.

What would happen if a superhero was also gay?

So the story line is a familiar one but the twist is new. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. I don't think it's gay fiction. I think it's about where and how you find your place in the world.

Worth the read.
reviewed Hero on + 7145 more book reviews
Helpful Score: 2
Reviewed by Julie M. Prince for TeensReadToo.com

Thom Creed is your average, everyday teenager. Except that he's prone to seizures. And he's gay. Oh, and he's the son of a superhero. An ex-superhero, actually. One who is shunned by the League as well as nearly every member of society. Oh, and Thom has superpowers of his own.

Obviously, life has never been normal, but Thom does his best to fit in. He shines on the school basketball team and does volunteer work while holding down three jobs. Until a series of events that would swallow any other kid whole sends Thom reeling into the very world he's been kept away from his entire life: the world of superheroes.

Now, while still trying to learn everything he can about his powers, the mysterious disappearance of his mother, and his own unexplored feelings, Thom is faced with new challenges. What he learns is that nothing is as it appears. Nothing and no one.

A plot- and action-driven novel, this book is ground-breaking in many ways. Not just in the obvious ways that one might think, although it is interesting to have a gay, teenage superhero as a protagonist. What kept me riveted was the look Moore offers at society. Our tendency to build people up and glory in tearing them to shreds and examining what's left. We thrive on heroes and everything they stand for, and yet, we're never content, as a people, to allow the heroes to enjoy the very things we want them to protect, like humanity, freedom, and individualism.

This book is smart. It keeps the reader engaged with a fast-paced scenes and one intriguing character after another while it conveys a message of redemption.
reviewed Hero on + 7145 more book reviews
Reviewed by Julie M. Prince for TeensReadToo.com

Thom Creed is your average, everyday teenager. Except that he's prone to seizures. And he's gay. Oh, and he's the son of a superhero. An ex-superhero, actually. One who is shunned by the League as well as nearly every member of society. Oh, and Thom has superpowers of his own.

Obviously, life has never been normal, but Thom does his best to fit in. He shines on the school basketball team and does volunteer work while holding down three jobs. Until a series of events that would swallow any other kid whole sends Thom reeling into the very world he's been kept away from his entire life: the world of superheroes.

Now, while still trying to learn everything he can about his powers, the mysterious disappearance of his mother, and his own unexplored feelings, Thom is faced with new challenges. What he learns is that nothing is as it appears. Nothing and no one.

A plot- and action-driven novel, this book is ground-breaking in many ways. Not just in the obvious ways that one might think, although it is interesting to have a gay, teenage superhero as a protagonist. What kept me riveted was the look Moore offers at society. Our tendency to build people up and glory in tearing them to shreds and examining what's left. We thrive on heroes and everything they stand for, and yet, we're never content, as a people, to allow the heroes to enjoy the very things we want them to protect, like humanity, freedom, and individualism.

This book is smart. It keeps the reader engaged with a fast-paced scenes and one intriguing character after another while it conveys a message of redemption.
reviewed Hero on + 31 more book reviews
This story has superheroes. The main character becomes a superhero, joins a team of superheroes, and fights villains. However, while 60% of this story may seem to be about superheroes, that's not ultimately what this book is about. It's primarily about being gay in our society or otherwise not fitting "the mold," and it's about family. At times things seem a bit overdone, but it was a decent book.